MEDIA ALL OVER THE JOINT!

For those that are in the know, and that would be you folks–the method of entertainment presented as moving imagery is easier to receive more than ever. Television is now accessible through any electronic device that can connect through an internet connection that sports a video screen, no matter how big or small the device is!

The visual media can be seen and consumed as short time video (running as little as six seconds), or for hours at a time! Granted, short form media is a whole lot easier to take since it can be viewed for a limited period of time even while doing something else. One can wait for a method of transportation to arrive while tuning in to a video image on their phone, for instance.

When it comes to movies, that is a whole other matter! Sure, you can watch a feature on a laptop, an electronic pad, or even a smartphone. Unless one is watching a melodrama that consists of a bunch of characters that talk to one another in a method of what’s known as “talking heads”, the notion of viewing something made for the big screen on a much smaller one doesn’t make much sense. Sometimes that is the only way to see a movie, especially if the movie in question was created for a larger viewing area. Looking at visuals that contain a lot of fast moving action, along with detailed elements that is support to enhance that for noted fast moving action would be totally lost on a screen that sports a 2” screen size. And the sound coming along with those visuals would be limited to audio that sounds OK, but could be a whole lot better to hear.

This is one of many reasons why the moving picture house (or houses) still exist in these fast acting and overly wired times. Movie theatre have been around as long as movies themselves, making the movie theater in concept exist for over one hundred years.

The theaters themselves as physical places have changed a whole lot since then. Once upon a time, a theater consisted of a few rows of seats facing a screen that was 3×4 in size. (Three lengths high by four lengths wide.) The imagery was projected from a film projection housed at the upper rear of the room showing imagery from motion picture film without any sound to go along with the imagery. Then film prints had a sound track along the images on the film that can reproduce audio in sync to the moving pictures. The projectors used had to have additional equipment attached to reproduce that sound.

To make a very long story short(er), today’s movie houses consists of multiple theaters that can showcase different movies to different audiences at the same time. The images are much sharper, bigger, and wider, while the sound is booming in ultra stereo! The images are no longer coming from traditional film stock that can scratch or break, but from a massive hard drive that contains a digital video file of the feature. The equipment and the digital imagery housed within the hard drive can provide a nearly error-free showing each time. And all of the projectors found within a mult screen theatre can be operated by a single person. There are even methods where the projectors can be functioning through artificial intelligence (AI) that can do the same job without human assistance. Although smart movie houses always keeps a person on stand-by just in case!

Since media can be seen and consumed anywhere and everywhere, the debate of movies experienced in a theater as an out-of-date method and the movies as a whole is dead and dying. But the question does linger. Is this threat of movies and the theaters that show them are really on their deathbeds? If this method of visiting a neighborhood movie house to see a feature film a thing of the past? Will movies be made so one can see the title on a handheld phone device that has a screen no bigger than three inches across?

The answer to those inquiries is a simple “no”! Movies theaters still exist to this very day, and the movies that come out of “Hollywood” are still being created. Perhaps the most interesting part, people are still willing to pay for the privilege of viewing a movie in a large darken room with dozens of other strangers that laugh, cry, yell, shriek, and otherwise react to all of the action depicted–the same way it’s been done for over a century! The setting of the theater may be different as well as the movie itself along with the way it’s seen, but the idea and concept is just the same!

As this article is being created, the summer blockbuster movie season is progressing in full swing. Movies that seem to draw the folks in (and make money in the process), are titles that are of the action/adventure variety (with emphasis of super hero/comic book form), animation for all ages (no “artsy” animated programs included in this bunch), as well as fantasy. (Fantasy includes sci-fi, or movies that take place in worlds that don’t exist with characters that are not necessarily of the human type!) These kind of movies are entertaining for the masses if they provide the solid entertainment they contain. Adding to that, folks will plunk down the money to see them. That income is shared between the source that created the film and to the movie theater, usually around a 70-30 split, although the ratio can vary!

So to answer to the question of the death of movies can be considered as “fake news!”. TV isn’t dying either! Broadcast TV, as well as channels found through a cable or satellite system may be going out, but it’s far from being deceased. It will change, and perhaps that change is for the better! As far as the quality of the said movies/TV/video programming is open for hard debate!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

No reviews this issue, but check back here next week for more of the news and details you look for! See you then!
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2018 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

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SOCIAL MEDIA MANIA

Social Media is no longer the novelty as it was once was. It’s now a way of life, and the stats prove this fact!

Earlier this year, the Pew Research Centerr filed a report upon the habits of social media from the domestic adult public at large based upon its usage, as well as who takes advantage of the type of media expressed via cyberspace land.

According to the report filed last March, Facebook and YouTube are the leaders here at this landscape. Some 73% have used YouTube, while 68% are on Facebook. 78% of younger Millenniums (aged 18 through 24) use Stapchat, 71% take advantage of Instagram, and a little less that half (45%) are on Twitter. And out of the 73% of all adults that use YouTube, some 94% of the 18-24 crowd use this form of viewing and/or posting media to that platform.

The report does go on by noting that 88% of those aged thirty or less use some form of social media. It drops ten points to 78% of those in their thirties and forties. Among those that are in their fifties through early-middle 60’s, 64% note they take advantage of social media. The minority that are social media users are those 65 and up, as 37% of this demographic are online with any of the standard platforms.

How often do they visit a social media platform? Facebook is known to have daily visitors as 51% report they visit the site multiple times per day. Snapchat ranks in second as 49% report they visit throughout the day. Instagram comes in third at 38%. YouTube receives a lot of hits, but not as often. 55% state they do visit but more on an occasional basis.

Breaking down things further in terms of demographic, females tend to use Pinetrest more than males (41% vs.14%), Linkedin are mostly used by those that are college graduates and/or of households that are of higher income. (50%). The messaging service WhatsApp is popular among hispanics as it reaches 49%. (It’s also popular in use within counties of Latin America.)

A question remains. How addictive are these groups in the use of social media? Not as much as one may suspect. When asked on how difficult would it be to free one’s self of social media, 59% as a whole stated they it would not be difficult to do so compared to the 40% that admitted it would be tough to let it go. The younger one is, the difficulty of being free from social media increases. Those 18 through 24 would find this act the hardest as 51% noted they would be in a bind to release themselves from social media. (49% stated that they can live without it for a while). 40% of the 25-29 age bracket gave its difficult ranking while those in their 30’s and 40’s stand at 45%. Perhaps the biggest group to live without all of this social media hubbub are those 50+ a.k.a. the “baby boomers”, as two-thirds noted that they could walk away from social media and function quite nicely!

The above stats came from research done by the Pew Research Center in January of ’18 through phone and online polls. All were done without the usage of specific knowledge of those being polled. So it can be assumed that the accuracy is rather high for what it presents.

It’s really no surprise that social media is what makes domestic life just what it is. It’s a method of gathering information, sharing details, and finding out who holds an interest (or lack thereof) to what’s going on for better or for worse. It’s the world’s biggest soapbox to discover new details, create new ideas, start or finish movements and its related aspects that make up part of the domesticated human drive of existence, no matter where one may be. And it’s a sure fire method for big companies to gather up information from others in order to to sell products, ideas, and opinions. It’s also been proven on how a few (really few) big companies can find out nearly anything and everything on specific groups, no matter what age they may be regardless to the legal aspect of the age(es) in question.

In spite of these privacy issue stances, folks will still flock to a few or perhaps to all of the platforms found in cyberspace land to post, pin, tweet, or whatever one does to get a point across for others to view or hear about an issue in question, no matter how far fetched it may become–if at all!

This writer has seen social media grow from the novelty it once was to the way of life it grew up to be. We will admit that this here newsletter and the staff behind it all is on selected social media platforms, from Facebook, Twitter, and even Linkedin. One can view selected episodes of Accessibly Live, a regional television program produced and hosted by this writer in the 1980‘s that became the predecessor to Accessibly Live Off-Line. And if this same writer ever gets around to it, I may present other program titles from the parent company of ALOL, Linear Cycle Productions. (Coming soon, ‘natch!) And a colleague of ours that assist us in our preservation of vintage television programs has posted bits and pieces of material for all to view and to comment on YouTube. So we are far immune to what social media can do for us, with us, and perhaps against us!

One thing for sure. Social media as we all know it will never go away! Granted, platforms may come and go or change the scope to what is used to be such as the case of MySpace where at one time was the be-all-to-end-all place to make one’s self known to the world, to other places that are long gone! But as the ‘net grows to the megagiant is now is, having a place in the cyberspace world is now smaller, faster, and maybe cheaper! All one needs is an internet connection and the device to get online! And that could be nearly all of us!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

Theatre Palisades presents Fredrick Knott’s WRITE ME A MURDER, a tale of two murder mystery writers who team up to create a story of a perfect murder, only to have that story turn into a reality.

The setting is the Rodingham Manor located in a rural community some 100 miles outside of London. Clive Rodingham (Tyler Parker) and his younger brother David (Jeff DeWitt) arrive to their childhood home to take aside of their ailing father, nearly at his deathbed. Clive is in line to inherit everything in the vast estate, but plans to sell much of the property to Charles Sturrock (Phillip Bartolf), a local land developer. David, who writes crime and murder mystery stories, would rather keep everything as they exist. This element brings a strain between the two siblings causing some havoc. Meanwhile, Charlie’s spouse Julie (Holly Sidell) a fledging writer, is asked if David can assists Julie into honing her writing skills. This inspires him to team up with Julie in creating the most perfect murder plot as their story. Perhaps this suggested plot becomes a disguise in the creation of an actual murder. They would be able to use the Rodingham home as their set. And who would become the victim, and most important, can they actually get away with acting on this method of crime? It’s all in the name of fiction, as well as completing a reachable act of possibly getting away with…..!

This play written by the master of mystery and thriller stage pieces Fredrick Knott, was only one of a trio of pieces he wrote in his entire career. (The other two are Dial “M” for Murder, and Wait Until Dark). Unlike the other for noted pair, this title as presented on the Theatre Palisades stage is the lessor one of the group. It does contain the same elements that make up the setting for murder, although with its three act running time, the murder itself isn’t in full development for a while. However, there is the tension aspect to face, and the performers that appear in this TP production add towards the climax that slowly unfolds. The cast that does appear that also features Michele Schultz as the Rodingham family physician Elizabeth Wooley, and Laura Goldstein as domestic maid Mrs. Tibbit, append themselves into the storyline, making this program very enjoyable and amusing–until the murder nearly commences! Michael-Anthony Nozzi, who previously directed TP’s production of Cat On A Hot Tin Roof a few years ago, directs this program with an easy paced yet steady buildup showcase from the basic concept to murder right to the fateful deed.

Since this is a period piece (the play takes place in the late 1940’s), the costuming by June Lissandrello speaks for the era, while longtime TP’s set designer Sherman Wayne creates a library/study space of a old British-style manor full of antique-esque furnishings with vintage weaponry (guns, knives, etc.) hanging on its wall as decor–possibly doubling as handy murder tools!

One can’t beat a classic whodunnit as this show fully demonstrates. And it can be seen with high sprits within the confines of one of Pacific Palisades’ finer gems found within this oceanside community.

WRITE ME A MURDER, presented by Theater Palisades, performs at the Pierson Playhouse, 941 Temescal Canyon Road (off Sunset Blvd.), Pacific Palisades, until July 15th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM.

For more information and for ticket reservations, call (310) 454-1970, or via online at http://www.TheatrePalisades.com

Theatre Palisades can also be found and followed through social media via Facebook and Twitter as “Theatre Palisades”.
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Continuing its run at the Hillcrest Center For The Arts of Thousand Oaks is the Tom Kitt/Brian Yorkey musical NEXT TO NORMAL, a domestic story of one’s woman struggle with her emotional nonconformity, and the family that must also face their own conclusions to her inner demons.

Michelle Lane is Diana. She’s been married to her husband Don (Brent Ramirez) for shy of twenty years. Through her marriage, she gave birth to two kids-Natalie (Julia Lester), and Gabe (Landen Starkman). The family lives a middle class life in a suburban bedroom community. Dan goes to work at a local architect firm, and Natalie is an on-the-go high school student. Diana keeps house, assuming that she can have her mind in gear in not only maintaining the homestead, but just keeping her life in check. Ever since she first encountered bouts with depression and anxiety some sixteen years before, she has been on some sort of medication while drifting in and out of various forms of manic ups and downs. She eventually sees a professional, Dr. Fine (Renee Cohen), who suggests more than prescription pills and basic therapy. While Natalie faces her mom’s inner bouts, she meets Henry (Daniel Bellusci), a fellow student in her high school that becomes intertwined between Diana’s emotional states and Natalie’s challenges. All of Diana’s feelings are linked to her son Gabe over an episode that occurred many years before. It’s a mini epic about a family that must face the disputes between emotional gain, loss, affection, and hope.

This musical with music by Tom Kitt and book and lyrics by Brian Yorkey is a unique musical of sorts. Perhaps the most obvious difference between this piece and any other musical that takes place within a domestic setting in an contemporary era is the fact that this show depicts a family clan that falls into a depressed and stressed-out state of being. Although Diana, as performed by Michelle Lane tries to be content, she is dependant on way too many little colored pills with names starting with “X”s and “Z”s. Husband Don as played by Drent Ramirez, gives as much support to Diane as he could, assuming that she allows such support. Daughter Natalie, as performed by Julia Lester, is a robust teen. Perhaps she’s a bit on the “full” side, but with what’s going on in the home, who can blame her over her physical state of being let alone emotional? Henry, played by Daniel Bellisci, is a ‘nerdy’ type that will stand for and with Natalie through her rises and falls. Renee Cohen as Dr. Fine, is a doctor that may be seen as a “rock star” type, but is just a therapist nevertheless. Rounding out the cast is Landen Starkman as Gabe, Diane’s son who will be his forever young self, or at least in Diane’s vision.

The dialogue spoken and the musical score it goes with expresses this internal story that consists of tunes that are upbeat at first, only to sink toward moody levels. Jan Roper’s musical direction completes these tasks with his five piece orchestra, featuring Jeff Castanon on guitar, Steve Clift on bass, Jeff Gibson on synthesizer keyboard, Alan Peck on percussion, and Roper on second keyboard. Corey Lynn Howe provides the set design that only shows a physical wall as a cubicle with a picture frame in its center, suggesting the domestic homestead, along with a series of floating sets and scenes that move the storyline along.

NEXT TO NORMAL’s basic theme shows how one can attempt to live a normal life through various methods of change, human effort, and chemical reactions. Granted, it’s not a “feel-good” musical in the traditional stance. But it’s bold enough to be presented in an informative yet entertaining stage technique. In spite of this dare, the method works out!

NEXT TO NORMAL, presented by Panic Productions, performs at the Hillcrest Center For The Arts, 403 West Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks, until June 17th. Showtimes are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Saturday-Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM.

Tickets and further information are available online at http://www.panicproductions.org.
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WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR? (Focus Features) is a documentary that calls upon the theories and personna of Fred Rogers, an ordained Presbyterian minister who used television not as a pulpit, but to teach and entertain children over the trails of life in a easy paced yet genteel manner. That program became Mister Roger’s Neighborhood, a staple on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) from its start in early 1968 and continued into the new millennium.

In this documentary, Fred Rogers is pictured as a man from Latrobe, Pennsylvania who saw television as a powerful tool to present the lessons of life in childhood using basic friendliness and the notion of honor and love. This was a far fetched method in children’s television placed within an era when kidvid was limited to cartoon shows (mostly seen on Saturday morning) as well as live action programming both on a local and national level where its main on-air purpose was to hard sell the sponsor’s products!

Using contemporary on-camera presence from such people as Francois Clemmons, Joe Negri, David Newell (people involved with the original program), as well as Joanne Rogers (“Mrs” Rogers) and musician Yo-Yo Ma, who made an early appearance on this show, comments for the man that spoke with a simple and calm method with the understanding on how kids emotionally functioned. As with the many other programs geared for the “small-fry” bunch (as the trade journal Variety used to refer this demographic) that littered the TV landscape during MRN’s presence on the air, it did use puppetry in its delivery, limiting those puppets in a separate segment called The Land of Make-Believe, a place that was inhibited by such characters as X the Owl and Daniel Tiger (among others), under the rule of King Friday the XIII. (Rogers himself provided the voices to these puppets, and never interacted with them on camera.)

This documentary produced and directed by Morgan Neville, whose previous documentary Thirty Feet From Stardom won him an Oscar, showcases the sprit of Rogers rather than giving him the life story treatment. (Rogers himself stated that if anyone wanted to create a biography of his life, that tale would be rather boring!)

One will get a bit of history of Rogers himself. Born in a rather privileged family, he get his start with a local show that aired on the regional NET (National Educational Television) affiliate WQED-TV in Pittsburgh, PA. in the 1950’s during the time when such stars as Pinky Lee, Soupy Sales, and Buffalo Bob Smith (Howdy Doody) used rowdy physical comedy for entertainment. Rogers had none of that. All he did was to let the viewer become aware that (s)he would be within an environment that had the perspectives of love and understanding, as well as teaching the basic things found in a domestic situation even if those things didn’t ring of the said love, including the notions of death and divorce.

For those that were raised on Fred Roger’s TV neighborhood from the late 1960’s through the turn of the 21st century, this documentary fulfills itself as a nostalgia trip where the former child (now an adult), can see the same landscape through mature eyes knowing that Rogers was one of a kind. Yet he was always in the foreshadow of another kids show that aired on the same TV network, often programed back-to-back, Sesame Street. SS still lives on in physical form, while Fred Rogers (and the neighborhood) still prevails through his belief of kindness and spirit using the magic number “143”!

Now playing in selected theaters. Rated “PG”.
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2018 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

I STREAM, YOU STREAM!

If anyone is paying attention to that is going on within the television landscape, the method of getting one’s programming through a streaming service is gaining traction more than ever, and the stats behind this fact prove it all!

According to the All Screen Streaming TV Census Report, as issued by the video intelligence platform Conviva, the number of hours of viewed content of programming provided by internet based media grew by 114% to some 4.8 billion subscribers in the first three months of this year as compared by the same period in 2017.

As to what device was used to view streaming media, also known as “over the top” media (OTT), a bit more than have (54%) was based on using a set-top streaming device (Apple TV, Ruku, Playstation console, etc.). And with the totality of actual video plays, mobile devices were mostly used at 42%, followed by the OTT devices with 35%, and computers (desktop/laptop) at 23%.

Although viewers start to watch more content through their mobile devices, these same viewers remain connected far longer through a dedicated TV unit. And among those same connected TV devices, Apple TV usage increased some 709%. Amazon Fire TV devices also increased by 411% from 2017.

It’s rather obvious that streaming television a.k.a. over the top television a.k.a. OTT, has been the latest rage in viewing video based media since the rise of cable TV in the 1980’s. Out of the many sources that provide such media, Netflix is perhaps the biggest player of them all. Although their offerings started out by providing theatrical movies through DVD rentals via mail order, this company expanded way beyond this method of delivery by not only offering a massive library of feature films, but by providing original TV series akin to what could be seen via cable or over the air, as well as original movies that bypassed a theatrical run.

And believe it our not, Netflix still offers their DVD rental services delivered through the mail for those that still hold the desire to see their video content without the use of streaming.

This form of television–and this writer will use the terms “television” and “TV” to describe how this content can be viewed since any electronic device that has a screen affixed to it mimics a traditional TV even though it may be an electronic pad, a desktop/laptop computer, or a smartphone–is becoming the preferred way to absorb media. Perhaps the reason to this method of getting media this way is the fact that one can watch what they want when they want it. If somebody wants to view an episode of, let’s say, House of Cards while stuck at an airport terminal at 2:00 AM, they can! If one heard about a new series that “everyone” is talking about, one doesn’t have to wait on a Thursday evening at 9:00 PM to catch an episode. They can log on (again, assuming that the viewer is a legit subscriber to the service in question), and watch away. Unlike programming a digital video recorder, or even a video cassette recorder from a generation before, one can view the program(s) on a whim, rather than to get around to set a DTR/VCR to record a specific channel on a specific day and time. The real leader here is the on-demand element to TV enjoyment.

Of course, the traditional cable outlets and the four TV networks are getting into the streaming game by offering the content they control via stream. So in passing, no matter what one wants to see, there it is just as long as the device is connected to an internet traveled line!

It will only be a few short years on how streaming will fit into the TV viewing landscape. It may take a little time, but not a real long time. It’s not the first period that the arrivial of TV became a threat to other existing media. Although movies shown in a theatre was the first sense of threat, movies and the theaters that run them still exist to this very day. And the box office numbers are proof that folks will still drag themselves to a movie house, plunk down the admission cost, and view a feature in a large darkened room full of strangers that laugh, cry, scream, yell, and do whatever one does going along with the action to what is seen on the big screen. The four broadcast networks still run programming over the air on selected days and times as they have for decades! (For ABC, CBS, and NBC, this trio has been at it for some seventy years!!)

So unless it’s no longer in existence, or in existence as it was once known, any form of media isn’t “dead”! Perhaps the only types of media programming that can be classified as dead is radio drama. Yes, it’s still presented from time to time, but only presented as a novelty rather than a regular method of delivery. But outside of this, movies shown within a theatre, TV content seen on a traditional set device, and the use of a TV antenna to get this type of media is well alive and living.

So no matter how one spends their time with TV, it’s going to be worth while! As to the actual entertainment quality of programming is a whole other matter!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

The 6th Act presents AN EVENING OF BETRAYAL, consisting of a pair of single-act plays that deal with the title subject on hand, is performing at Theatre 68 in North Hollywood.

The first play is Harold Pinter’s Betrayal that tells the story of an affair between Emma (Liza Seneca) and Jerry (Adam J. Smith). The sense opens with a meeting of the two at a pub shortly after Emma’s spouse Robert (William DeMeritt) left her. Then the storyline shifts backwards a few years that illustrates how this affair developed as these three were once mutual acquaintances. It concludes a few more years before showing off how this trio developed as friends, business associates, and eventually as lovers.

The second act is William’s Shakespeare’s Othello. This time, it storyline concentrates among its four leads: Lago (Adam J. Smith), Desdemona (Liza Seneca) Cassio (Luke McClure), and the title character Othello (William DeMeritt). Its method is also in the same fashion as Betrayal, opening with its final scene, then progressing backwards with the focus on how these four battled through the sense of methods of treachery and falseness, with death added to the aspects of the double-dealings at stake.

What makes this production rather interesting is the fact that these two plays, written hundreds of years apart, deals within the same subject matter as the pair also contains rich dialogue and the fact that the two playwrights were of British decent! The cast of four performers are double billed in both productions, adapting their roles between the 20th century and the 16th. Every one of these players showcase their talents very well, especially with their parts playing the roles The Bard created! Liza Seneca, who appears as Emma in the former program and Desdemona in the latter, adapted the one-act version of Othello that still holds that fierce drama and conflict that has been thrilling audiences for centuries.

With such one-act plays, the production values seen on stage are basic yet tight. Gary Lee Reeds provides the scenic design, while Lena Sands provides the costuming that really proves itself during the Shakespeare portion of the program. Adding Chu-hsuan Chang’s lighting and Nick Neidorf’s sound design, one has a duo of plays that takes on the elements of deception to its final conclusions.

Directed by Elizabeth Swain, AN EVENING OF BETRAYAL presents itself proving that the act of betrayal never goes out of style as it still continues in the present day. Thus, the momentum continues!

AN EVENING OF BETRAYAL, presented by The 6th Act, and performs at Theatre 68, 5112 Lankershim Blvd, North Hollywood, until June 24th. Showtimes are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM. For ticket reservations, visit http://www.BrownPaperTickets.com/event/3415884

Visit The 6th Act’s website at http://www.The6thAct.com
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2018 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

HAPPY AN-A-VERSARY!!

It seems that media-based programs and anniversary dates tend to go hand in hand. With the recent idea of remaking/revising/rebooting television series from the not-so-recent past, to the re-releasing of feature films either by way of home video or through theater screenings, it’s interesting to note that these revisits of movies and TV shows from another era are done just because the calendar year will note that it’s been a milestone year since the title in question first made its mark to the public and to its media universe.

This summer provides a number of movie revival screenings. Warner Bros. is currently hosting in limited numbers, theatrical screenings of MGM’s 2001: A Space Odyssey for its 50th anniversary. The Motion Picture Academy also known as AMPAS, is arranging a series of special one-time only screening of movies that all are making their milestone anniversary. On July 23rd, they will present the original version of the movie Hairspray for its 30th anniversary. On August 15th, the movie Grease will be run for its 40th anniversary. A week later on the 22nd, The Joy Luck Club will be honored for its 25th, and so on. (For more details on these upcoming AMPAS screenings, visit the Motion Picture Academy’s web site at http://www.oscars.org)

Even TV shows have been sited for its noted dates of creation as well. The well received revival of the series Roseanne has been noted that its been thirty years since that program first made its mark. Ditto for the anticipated revisit of Murphy Brown, also celebrating its 30th. Roseanne, currently airs on ABC and has been already renewed for the next reason. Murphy Brown will air on CBS in the fall. Check your local listings for day and time, as well as details for streaming availability.

Granted, it’s always nice to recall something or another on its noted date of creation, especially if that date falls on a “round” number. As to the movie titles that AMPAS is paying tribute, each one falls on a noted time point. The Joy Luck Club is at its silver anniversary. Hairspray is hitting 30, and so on. Although those titles, as well as the TV series are also hitting their big 3-0, are well known and are linked as fan favorites. Not every movie or TV show that’s been in existence for some time is worth a celebration. This is just because, though some titles may have a small and perhaps loyal cult following to a humble few, these movies and/or TV shows are amusing for what they are (or were), but not enough to hold a big celebration. It’s not likely for such institutions as AMPAS would pay tribute to the 25th anniversary release of Super Mario Brothers, the 30th anniversary of Mac and Me, or even the 50th anniversary of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, although that latter title is a “guilty-pleasure” movie of this writer.

And since we are on the subject of secret movie favorites, yours truly has a desire to make an anniversary of sorts for a “good-bad” movie that was released around this time of year: The Flintstones.

On May 27th, 1994, Universal Studios, then owned by the electronics firm Matsushita (better known as Panasonic), kicked off their summer movie season with this big and rather brassy live action rendering of the classic TV cartoon from Hanna-Barbara Studios. John Goodman, who was still appearing in Roseanne, played Fred Flintstone. Rick Moranis, another comic performer from TV land, was cast as Barney Rubble, Fred’s neighbor and best buddy. Elizabeth Perkins, who wasn’t known for being an actress of comedy, although she did appear in previous productions that were humorous in nature, played Wilma Flintstone, Fred’s wife. And Rosie O’Donnell, who had a track record for her stand-up comedy as well as appearing in other TV programs and movies usually playing a character that was of comic relief, played Betty Rubble, Barney’s spouse. These four carried the movie that had a plot for what it was, where Fred receives a promotion at the rock quarry, only to face up with the challenges he eventually meets.

The movie also featured an amusing supporting cast, including Kyle MacLachlan, Halle Berry, and Liz Taylor as Pearl Slaghoople, Wilma’s mother and Fred’s mother-in-law. And with movies released in the 1990’s and 2000s, if featured cameo appearances with those connected to the original source. The Flintstones cartoon creators, Joe Hanna and Bill Barbara has a brief appearance, as well as Jean Vander Pyl, a one-time radio actresses and did voice work for HB, including the vocals for Wilma in various versions of the Flintstone series of the 1960’s to its many revivals in the 1970’s, 80’s and 90’s.

This feature was heavily promoted through the media sources that were available at the time, from billboards, bus shelters posters, ads on busses, and through heavy commercial spots on TV. KISS-FM, the big top-40 station in Los Angeles, did plenty of promotions as well, from giving away movie tickets on-air, to playing selected tunes extracted from the Flintstones movie soundtrack album as performed by (among other artists) the 1980’s-era new wave group The B-52‘s–billed as the “BC-52’s”.

The reviews from the critics on hand were mixed. The screenplay was credited to three screenwriters-Tom S. Parker, Jim Jennewein, and Steven E. de Souza, although it was rewritten dozens of times by as many as thirty different writers! However, folks flocked on to their local multiplexes to take advantage of all of the hype this feature generated. And according to stats found through the website http://www.BoxOfficeMojo.com (affiliated with the ever lovin’ IMDB.com, both owned and operated by Amazon), it did gross some 130 million dollars in North America riding on a 46 million dollar production budget. This amount was decent for a movie of this nature during the period when summer movies were rather epic in quality in addition to being loud and brassy. But considering its only video competition available at the time was home video where new releases took an average from four to six months to arrive on videotape–VHS mostly, although Beta and 12” laserdiscs were alternatives. The pay services available through cable TV such as HBO, Showtime, and the like still made emphasis on its movie line up than its rather limited original programming, even though it take a year for these features to arrive from theatrical release to the premium TV landscape.

This writer did have an opportunity to see this title at a press screening the Tuesday before its release date at the DGA theater on Sunset Blvd. in West Hollywood. Yours truly found the movie rather silly but amusing. Its soundtrack, as received by this same reporter on an audio cassette from MCA Records, Universal Studio’s record label, had songs that were rather bad. In fact, some tunes were downright awful! (No inessential music score tracks were made available on the soundtrack album.) However, movies and music still were programmed as a hand-in-hand notion at the time, and perhaps the real reason for a commercial soundtrack album to exist in the first place.

Oh, yes! The movie was co-produced by Amblin Entertainment, Steven Spielberg’s production company. Although Stevie himself wasn’t directly involved with this movie outside of being an “executive producer”, the movie titles and advertising materials boasted the line “Steven Speilrock Presents..”, letting those movie goers know that Steve was loosely connected with this film as his name was still was connected with crowd pleasing feature films.

So why is this writer making commentary about this movie, even when this year makes its 24th anniversary rather than its 25th? No real reason outside of the fact that this same writer recalls when summer movies were still silly yet amusing. Between middle May through late August, the major studios based in “Hollywood” would offer feature films that were created for sheer entertainment at big budgets and perhaps bigger profits. Granted, not every title that catered to this aspects were popular in terms of being audience pleasers, but they were there for the taking, or at least for the price of admission!

During that season, such titles made available to the multiplexes consisted of (among many others), Paramount’s Beverly Hills Cop III, 20th Century Fox’s Speed, Columbia’s (Sony Studios) City Slickers II: The Legion of Curly’s Gold, Warner Bros. Maverick, and New Line’s The Mask, starring Jim Carry and a load of special effects! Perhaps the biggest crowd pleaser of them all came from the Walt Disney Company with its animated title The Lion King.

Other movies found on the big screen ranged from action laden True Lies (Fox) starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Paramount’s Forrest Gump, featuring another movie star favorite, Tom Hanks playing the title character that also contains a lot of special effects, to Universal’s attempt to being back The Shadow to 1990’s audiences with moderate success. All were part of the movie scene in the summer of ’94.

Come next year, every one of these for noted movies will commemorate their silver anniversary. It isn’t necessarily known if there will be any revival screenings of these titles on a large scale. Whatever the case, it’s a proven fact that movies are suppose to be entertaining! As long as folks are willing to plunk down their hard earned money, they will indeed see you at the movies!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

Impro Theatre closes out their ten month residency at Santa Monica’s Broad Stage complex with TENNESSEE WILLIAMS UNSCRIPTED, a program where this theater troupe will create an improvised play depicted in the style of playwright Thomas Lanier “Tennessee” Williams III.

In this performance, a series of players from Impro Theater will create a brand new work that features characters, dialogue, plot points, and other notions that would (and could) be found in a stage piece as written by Williams. The only elements that this theatre company has to create this play is in the form of a few vague suggestions from the theater audience, such as a suggestion of an item that can be a family heirloom (“a silver candlestick”) or an article of clothing (“a fur coat”). From there, the play begins using the said suggestions (or not) and continues with the cast working by the seat of their pants, making up everything as they go along. Each performance will instantly become a world premier as well as a closing night performance. In other words, no two performances are alike! Every show will be totally different outside of its theme and the repertory cast performing it all.

Impro Theater previously presented this Tennessee Williams Unscripted program at The Falcon Theatre in Toluca Lake (now known as The Gary Marshall Theatre) in 2016 to rave reviews. (ALOL’s review can be found in Vol. 21-No. 26). This will be an opportunity to see for the first (and final) time, a “brand new” Tennessee Williams play that never existed! And yes, a lot of what will be seen will contain plenty of comical overtones as nobody knows what’s going to happen next, and one can mint their julep to that!

TENNESSEE WILLIAMS UNSCRIPTED will be presented by Impro Theatre and performs at The Broad Stage (The Edye theater space), 1310 11th Street (at Santa Monica Blvd.), Santa Monica. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday, June 15th and 16th at 8:00 PM, and Sunday June 17th at 2:00 PM.

For more information on TWU as well as other programs presented at The Broad Stage, visit the website at https://www.TheBroadStage.org

Visit Impro Theatre online at http://www.ImproTheatre.com
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The Angel City Chorale presents ONE WORLD MANY VOICES II, the concert for the early Summer season featuring music and voices that speak (or sing) for the remote parts of the world, performing at Immanuel Presbyterian Church, located within the Koreatown section of Los Angeles.

The concert will consist of a 160 voice chorale of various tones and octaves performing selections that gives musical speech for the nations and sectors of the civilized world. Countries represented ranges from such nations as Ireland, Mexico, Russia, Nepal, Indonesia, Brazil, South Africa, and points in between.

Sue Fink, artistic director of the ACC, will conduct the vocal troupe backed by a thirty-plus piece orchestra performing legacy and contemporary world music. Such selections presented among others, will be Annie Lennox’ A Thousand Beautiful Things, Antonio Carlos Jobim’s Samba Do Aviao, and a new work by friend of the ACC, the Grammy winning composer Christopher Tin. And the chorale will perform a reprise of their own version of Toto’s Africa, that became a hit on ACC’s YouTube channel!

In addition, The Amy Foundation Youth Choir based in Cape Town, South Africa will share the stage with the ACC as their special guests performing their personal take of tunes that celebrate the world and its citizens.

This concert marks a milestone for the ACC as this group celebrates its 25th anniversary this year, founded in 1993 by Sue Fink when it was based at McCabe’s Guitar Shop in Santa Monica with just eighteen singers as members. A quarter century later, this humble clan grew up to where it has grown to where it remains today by keeping their focus intact in dedicated to building community one song at a time!

ONE WORLD MANY VOICES II will take place for two performances only, Saturday, June 2nd and Sunday, June 3rd at 7:00 PM at their newly adapted home, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, 3300 Wilshire Blvd., between Vermont and Normandie Avenues, Los Angeles (90010).

For more information on this event including ticketing details, call (310) 943-9231, or visit online at http://www.AngelCityChorale.com

Visit ACC through their social media outlets via Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AngelCityChorale, YouTube http://www.youtube.com/user/AngelCityChorale, Twitter https://twitter.com/AngelCityChoral and SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/angelcitychorale

Note: This article also appeared in Vol. 26. No. 21. -Eds.
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2018 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

BOYS WILL BE BOYS(?!)

Within the last few years, the on-again-off-again so-called war between men and women has been ranging upon the (social) media landscape, from gender equality, sexual harassment cases popping out from the woodwork, to various political and social movements that sport a title with a hashtag as its first letter in its label. Many of these movements are for real, with others tend to speak for a selected few, if any!

Granted, it’s wise to being some of these issues to the attention to the public at large. Thanks to the powers that the ‘net holds, it’s been a whole lot easier to conduct these viewpoints from what previous generations used to do before. This is both viewed as a good thing and a not-so-good thing, and it holds an ideal side and its weaker end. The good notion (one of many) is that anyone can bring these issues to everyone’s attention. The bad notion (again, one of many) is the fact that anyone can bring these issues to everyone’s attention, wherever the masses want to know about these standards or not.

Between the sides, who has the upper hand in these actions, men or women? It all depends on what the situations speak of and speak for. The woman’s issues have been the “loudest” between the two for various reasons. However, the men have given their backlash of the points that the other side accounts for. Those counterpoints hold a vast range to what they are and the notions that they are expressed. However, there has been related points that are not necessarily of a legal or moral standpoint that these men (and even women) point out. Perhaps they may not necessarily be related, but the social and political climate notes that this is perhaps an ideal time to bring these elements out in the open for what they are all worth.

Marketing groups have been studying the habits of men and women for decades. Ditto for organizations that study the domestic behavior of men and women, boys and girls, guys ‘n gals, and so on. Even though the idea notion is to have everyone stand upon equal ground, these habits and traits have their differences when it comes to age, lifestyle choices, and how they see themselves within the neighborhoods they exist in.

One study (out of many no doubt) focused upon the Millennial and “Gen Z” aged male. To bring the reader up to date, a person of Millennial age range between the birth years of 1981-1995, making these folks in their early twenties through middle-late 30’s. A “Gen Z” person (the name comes from “Generation Z”, far removed from a “Generation X” person that would be born between 1965-1980) was born between 1996-2006, making this group aged from twelve through twenty-two. Anyway, this study as conducted by Youth IQ questioned those between age thirteen through 35 to rate a series of attitudinal statements about how they see themselves and the world around them. Within this report, men from their early 20’s through middle 30’s have shown themselves to be intensely more in step with their emotions than previous and transpired generations. In this report, some 68% of age men agree to the fact that there is nothing wrong with men/guys acting sensitive.
 To express further, three out of five Millennial men admitted they are into food and cooking. This is no real surprise there since outlets as The Food Network brought a number of men as their stars, such as Alton Brown, Bobby Flay, and a host of others. They also express a passion of travel as 63% acknowledged this fact, and not necessarily any form of “adventurous” travel either. They are pleased to see London and Paris for what these places stand for verses going into the backlands to fight alligators along the Amazon river.

But getting into the sensitive stuff, 80% of men stated they do believe in true love, and a little over half noted that their parents (or parent figures) are their best friends. The same amount noted their being spiritual–not necessarily “religious” per se, but fall into a related element of belief. And 60% do agree that it’s very important to support their own social causes through time, financial support, or both. (The same amount of women also believe this fact).

With the good comes the not-so-good. Many of these same men see their gender being challenged. With the sexual harassment stories coming into view, some 25% of men feels that the “world” hates men as a whole. 27% agreed to the notion that is rather difficult to be a man. And 70% of men agreed to the fact that “I am happy that the victims are finally able to come out of the darkness” and “I am happy that these men will no longer be able to use their power to hurt people.”

This reporter also sees a vast difference between the social and emotion differences that men and women tend to hold on to. For instance, this writer participated in a study over the dynamics of friendship that domestic men and women go through. Women tend to have large(r) support groups when it comes through their personal ups and downs ranging from work and employment, family life, martial status, and stage of life and lifestyle. Men, on the other hand, don’t appear to have such support groups placed within an obvious placement. Many churches for instance, both conduct men and woman’s spiritual and ministry groups. The woman’s groups have their bible studies and all, but many of these woman’s groups also acknowledge a sense of happiness with the most common term “laughter”, and the encouragement of friendship. The men’s group (when they do exist) carry their support through emotional (spiritual) strength. When they do have get togethers, it’s usually over BBQ. One men’s ministry group based in a church in central Oklahoma even have their bible study meetings that involve shooting firearms(!)

Of course, these differences will always continue in some method. Some will come along to everyone’s attention, while others will fade away. Personal tastes and wide range viewpoints will dictate what will continue and what will blow itself out. Whatever the case, let the boys be boys and the girls be girls, all within reason! If it remains a war, let the two sides reach an agreement and call a truce. If it’s an issue to correct, make the correct changes. If it’s another point to tweet about, then let it be! And if the toilet seat remains in the “up” or “down” position, then let the other raise or lower the seat for their personal use! ‘Nuff said!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

Theatre 40 of Beverly Hills closes out their 2017-18 season with A.A. Milne’s MR. PIM PASSES BY, a light comedy about and man who makes an announcement of a person assumed to be dead is well alive, and a young lady’s desire to wed her fiancé, an aspiring artist.

The setting is the humble country homestead of Olivia and George Marden (Roslyn Cohn and John Wallace Combs). They receive a visit from Caraway Pim (Jeffrey Winner) where he makes a statement that Olivia’s former spouse is not deceased, but very much alive. Since she is already married to George and has been for some five years, this would mean that she may have two spouses, making her a bigamist. Mr. Pim has been known to be a bit absent minded as he becomes confused with names. Meanwhile, their niece Dinah (Nathalie Rudolph) is engaged to marry Brian Strange (Troy Whitaker, alternating with Jacob Osborne) a budding artist who is into creating cubism paintings. Adding to these episodes is the presence of Aunt Julia (Casey Jones), as well as Ann (Laura Lee Walsh) who serves as on-stage narrator giving the details on what is taking place within the household.

This play was written by Alan Alexander Milne, an author of plays and poetry active in England in the early part of the 20th century. He would be forever known for his later creation of a series of stories for children featuring a stuffed bear named Winnie The Pooh. But before Pooh made its debut in 1925, Milne composed Mr. Pim and was first presented for the stage in 1919. With such British plays from this era, it’s very talky. Every character has a lot to say during each plot progression, even though the title character Mr. Pim has minimal stage time. His character first arrives only to leave, and makes an on-and-off appearance.

In this Theatre 40 production, the setting takes place in the USA (Woodbury, Connecticut), where everyone speaks with American accents. Also, the period these antics takes place is in the present. This contemporary setting gives this play its appeal, even though much of the dialogue lasts longer that one would expect in a stage program that occurs within a domestic setting in the time of “now”. As to the cast, Roslyn Cohn and John Wallace Combs as Olivia and George are center stage in this show as they go through their motions. Nathalie Rudolph as Diane and Troy Whitaker as Brian are the younger pair that perform as proper as the elder leads, just in a youthful stance. And though this play takes place in the present era, these couples, as well as the rest of the cast, are free from using contemporary devices i.e. cell phones. This is just because there was no real need to use anything that can transmit a call, although the Mr. Pim character as performed by Jeffrey Winner, has a desire to hand mail a letter! His character is perhaps the most amusing one of them all. His persona resembles the character performer Marvin Kaplan, who was known to play “nebbish”-types. Although this Mr. Pim isn’t exactly a milquetoast, he does come rather close!

As to what’s seen on stage that has nothing to do with actors delivering their lines, Michele Young provides the costuming that ranges from a casual outfits to Mr. Pim’s grey suit. And Theatre 40’s residential set designer Jeff G. Rack provides the living room space for the “House of Marden” where at center stage is a wide entrance doorway where the drapes will hang. A minor plot point contained has Olivia creating a set of drapes that holds a mid-20th Century pattern to it–a design that wouldn’t become a hit for another thirty or so years from 1919!

MR. PIM PASSES BY can be seen as a curio stage piece of sorts as this play isn’t performed as much due to its amount of dialogue spoken, as well as its length! (Theatre 40 took measures of cutting down this pice from its original three acts down to two without missing any of its continuity.) Whatever the case, the production is charming and witty. The humor may not have any belly laughs, but it’s still pleasant to witness on the Theatre 40 floorboards.

MR. PIM PASSES BY, presented by Theatre 40 and performs at the Reuben Cordova Theatre, located within the campus of Beverly Hills High School, 241 South Moreno Drive (off little Santa Monica Blvd.) Beverly Hills, until June 17th. Showtimes are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM.

For ticket reservations or for more information, call (310) 364-0535, or via online at http://www.Theatre40.org

Theatre 40 has just released its schedule of plays for their 2018-19 season. Complete details on that line-up can be found on the Theatre 40 website.
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West Coast Jewish Theatre presents Deborah Zoe Laufer’s THE LAST SCHWARTZ, a comedy about a dysfunctional family who gathers for the commemoration of the anniversary of their father’s death, and the bickering and revealing of inner secrets that tend to go with such family gatherings.

The Schwartz clan, whose contemporary ancestors maintain a homestead in the Catskill mountains of New York State, comes together to remember the first anniversary of the death of their father Manny. Jewish tradition dictates that a year after someone’s passing, the tombstone to where the deceased is buried is unveiled. The family itself consists of Norma (Cheryl David) her brother Herb (Warren Davis), his spouse Bonnie (Samantha Klein, alternating with Rainbow Underhill), with siblings Simon (David Amito), and Gene (Mike Bash). Each family member holds their own personalities. Norma is the leader of the group that wants to keep family and faith based traditions alive. Herb is a bit more relaxed to Norma’s beliefs. Same goes for Bonnie who was once non-Jewish but later converted, Simon is in frail health with poor eyesight, and can’t tolerate somebody touching him. He keeps to himself studying astrology, always glancing in a telescope. Gene is more into a freewheeling lifestyle. He even brings his girlfriend along, Kia (Natalie Polisson). She is an actress that’s blond, ditzy, and is a Shiksa. (Non-Jewish!) Although she’s glad to be part of the commendation, she really doesn’t understand what’s really going on. With these family members so far apart physically and emotionally, conflicts arises between the fate of the family estate, and those that may (or may not) get anything from it. But the real battle asks if everyone is going to survive, even though the family legacy is at stake.

This one-act comedy written by Deborah Zoe Laufer contains a lot of stereotypical characters that gives this show much of its comical relief. The setting may not appear to be anything of a humorous nature (a traditional Yahrteit), but with a cluster of family members that are on opposite sides, one can get (and receive) plenty of laughs! The cast of six blend well with one another. The person that really steals the show is Natalie Polisson as Kia, the dumb blond Valley girl-type that may be an adult, but holds the mentality (and the body) of a fifteen year old! Her character has plenty of stage time that just gets better each minute that adds quite a bit to the play’s comic relief. And with its single act presence, the one-liners are tight enough where a touch of bittersweet settlement remains. There’s a hint of sadness present, but it still remains as a comedy.

The set the play takes place in the living room of the Schwartz home is designed by Jeff G. Rack and Amanda Sauter. The stage consists of some pleasant yet slightly worn pieces of furnishings, more worn books on a back shelf, and well as an assortment of various knickknacks that makes this home a home. It’s nothing remarkable, yet it’s still home nevertheless!

Directed by Kiff Scholl, THE LAST SCHWARTZ is both comical and somber with an emphasis on the former. With such a play as this one, let’s hope this production won’t become the last of its tribe. It’s too good to fade away!

THE LAST SCHWARTZ, presented by the West Coast Jewish Theatre, and performs at the Edgemar Center for the Arts, 2437 Main Street, Santa Monica, until July 1st. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 3:00 PM. For ticket reservations or for more details, call (310) 392-7327, or online at http://www.Edgemar.org
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BOOK CLUB (Paramount) stars Diane Keaton as Diane, Jane Fonda as Vivian, Candace Burgan as Sharon, and Mary Steenburgan as Carol. These woman living in the Los Angeles region has been meeting on a regular basis for their own book review club, a ritual that’s been going on for some forty plus years. Over time, each one of them has experience their life going different ways. Diana was once married to an accountant and raised a pair of daughters. After her husband passed, she’s making an attempt to live her life alone, although her two now-adult kids want her to move with them to Arizona. Vivian owns a ritzy hotel in Beverly Hills, and still carries on with no commitment romantic flings. Sharon is a federal judge and has been divorced for years. Carol’s marriage to her husband Bruce (Craig T. Nelson) is just there. Although he’s retired, he seems to be interested in fixing an old motorcycle than anything else. Things changes for these seasoned troupe of women when Vivian picks E. L. James’ Fifty Shards of Grey, a novel that is rather kinky in nature. Although anything with the notion of sex were all far from their minds, things begin to change for everyone by having their love lives enhanced through different means.

This comedy is unique than a standard romantic comedy of recent times. It doesn’t involve a single man and woman. It involves four women over the age of sixty, and each one experiences a romantic fling that isn’t a “hook-up”. However, with the plot lines and the cast of players that are featured in this title, it appears that this movie seems to be a relic of a flick released in the 1990’s! The notions depicted were more commonplace some twenty to twenty five years before when light comedy and drama could be used (and gotten away with) in a theatrical film. Most (not all) moves released in today’s landscape that are classified as comical dramas or dramatic comedies are somewhat geared for video and its equivalents. The screenplay by Bill Holderman (who also directs) and Erin Simms contains a number of witty one-liners embedded that are humorous and cute for what they ares as one can experience older women talk and feel about being romantic, if not sexual! The leading women are far from being prudes, but they aren’t horny either!

The cast appearing this film also gives this movie a twenty-five-years-too-late attitude as well. The four leads, Fonda, Burgan, Keaton, and Steenburgan, were in their peak decades before from the 1960‘s through the turn of the 21st century. Its supporting players also come from decades past that include Andy Garcia, Don Johnson, Richard Dreyfuss, and Ed Begly, Jr. playing the suitors (or ex-suiters) of the four leads. The rest of the supporting cast including Alica Silverstone (of Clueless fame), Tommy Dewey, and Katie Aselton, who are just as amusing and are more suitable to see in a current series for the TV/video streaming landscape.

It is rather obvious that this movie’s target audience is females over the age of 35, (perhaps over the age of 45) who don’t seem to hold interest to superhero/action-adventure features, aggressive comedies, or whatever the fare the major studios tend to churn out this time of the year. And since this movie is rated PG-13 for mild cussing and suggested sexual innuendo that is suitable for cable/streaming television, it’s a great flick to see with one’s BFFs. As for the men folk? Well, there will be other movie releases out there loaded with plenty of explosions, gunfire, and young scantly dressed gals in ‘em to take a glance at!

BOOK CLUB is now playing at all of the standard multiplexes nationwide.
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The Angel City Chorale presents ONE WORLD MANY VOICES II, the concert for the early Summer season featuring music and voices that speak (or sing) for the remote parts of the world, performing at Immanuel Presbyterian Church, located within the Koreatown section of Los Angeles.

The concert will consist of a 160 voice chorale of various tones and octaves performing selections that gives musical speech for the nations and sectors of the civilized world. Countries represented ranges from such nations as Ireland, Mexico, Russia, Nepal, Indonesia, Brazil, South Africa, and points in between.

Sue Fink, artistic director of the ACC, will conduct the vocal troupe backed by a thirty-plus piece orchestra performing legacy and contemporary world music. Such selections presented among others, will be Annie Lennox’ A Thousand Beautiful Things, Antonio Carlos Jobim’s Samba Do Aviao, and a new work by friend of the ACC, the Grammy winning composer Christopher Tin. And the chorale will perform a reprise of their own version of Toto’s Africa, that became a hit on ACC’s YouTube channel!

In addition, The Amy Foundation Youth Choir based in Cape Town, South Africa will share the stage with the ACC as their special guests performing their personal take of tunes that celebrate the world and its citizens.

This concert marks a milestone for the ACC as this group celebrates its 25th anniversary this year, founded in 1993 by Sue Fink when it was based at McCabe’s Guitar Shop in Santa Monica with just eighteen singers as members. A quarter century later, this humble clan grew up to where it has grown to where it remains today by keeping their focus intact in dedicated to building community one song at a time!

ONE WORLD MANY VOICES II will take place for two performances only, Saturday, June 2nd and Sunday, June 3rd at 7:00 PM at their newly adapted home, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, 3300 Wilshire Blvd., between Vermont and Normandie Avenues, Los Angeles (90010).

For more information on this event including ticketing details, call (310) 943-9231, or visit online at http://www.AngelCityChorale.com

Visit ACC through their social media outlets via Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AngelCityChorale, YouTube http://www.youtube.com/user/AngelCityChorale, Twitter https://twitter.com/AngelCityChoral and SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/angelcitychorale
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2018 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

THE NEW FACE OF FACEBOOK!

Back in the not-so-long ago days of the previous decade (the “aughts”), the hazy, crazy, and perhaps lazy days of the internet was taking hold from being a novelty to a way of life. People were now able to do things as send e-mails back and forth, pay their utility bills online, shop for nearly anything from shoes, ships, and ceiling wax (thanks to the rise of Amazon of course), as well as to know about people using social media. In those so-called early days, MySpace.com was the get-go place to do all of that social gathering nonsense, from telling a bit about one’s self through bios and other tales, stating what one likes to ready, watch, or play with (video games, that is), as well as finding others who might share one’s interest. This was the way to become cyber friends, leading to the possibility of becoming “real” friends either through mutual bonds, or even as “hook-up” pals!

Facebook.com, the new(er) kid on the block, did take a while to get its foot in the door. Originally created for those attending school (college mostly), one could only register if one used an e-mail address that ended in “.edu”. This limited a lot of folks that wanted to become a face(book) in the crowd since many folks didn’t have such an address accessible. They were getting their e-mails through their internet service providers such as American Online, Prodigy, CompuServe, as well as local and regional service providers. Then again, MySpace that didn’t have such a restriction, so anyone with a valid email address could join. This was the case for the other rising social media platforms that took nearly anybody as well–real of otherwise.

Facebook eventually changed their methods, allowing the masses to clime on board with or without an “.edu” email address. And indeed they did! Before long, Facebook became the number one place to go for letting anyone and everyone know that you are out there in the cold cruel world. You could do the same stuff as the other social media platforms, as well as using Facebook to find long lost friends, relatives, and others one once associated with that once wound up on a personal “whatever became of…?” list.

So what happend to the other social media platforms? Many of them would up changing their methods by reforming their place on the web. Others simply went out of business by going off the air. Their data they kept on you either wound up on some massive hard drive stored somewhere in the world, or was erased!

And what became of MySpace? News, Incorporated, the name of the parent company of Fox Media, bought the company for a massive amount of money. They were grabbing this portal to make their presence on the web by using it as (among other notions), a cross platform for promoting feature films, as well as TV programs airing on the Fox Network. When Facebook moved way forward, News, Inc. wound up selling the company at a fire sale price. Today, MySpace is using the ideas of promoting indy music bands (its original intention), as well as news about other media based elements. The social media stuff has since taken a backseat since their are other ways to express one’s self online.

In today’s virtual world, Facebook is still the get-go place for social media. However, it’s not the same Facebook as this writer once knew. Back around 2010 or so, we conducted an experiment by creating a number of fake entries. We created a roster of characters (both as male and female), writing up some backgrounds notes on our folks making them as real as they could get. We even had them post pictures from what they were doing, although all of the pictures we used came from various sources from stock photo libraries to this writer’s personal collection.

This experiment was created not only to discover how others would react to these invisible people, but to discover how much personal information we can obtain from these same folks without ever asking for anything. We were not going to prompt anyone with requesting details about themselves. We were going to wait and see what they were willing to note about themselves on their own terms.

Interestingly enough, we were about to find bits and pieces about some personal details, such as birthdays (day, month, and year), address for these folks, and other notions that could be used by others for questionable purposes.

That was a few years ago. Since then, the concerns of privacy changed the attitude that once made Facebook fun and amusing. Many people are now hesitant of listing the community they exist in, as well as placing any of their personal interests and events. A number of these folks used to write original commentary about the events of their lives that had this news service (‘us”) write a weekly column called Tiffi’s Friends Say… that consisted a line or two extracted from the many “friends” of one of our creations, Tiffi Purewhite. Although a few folks still do post these one or two-line commentary notes, others are just using their Facebook presence by posting (or reposting) information that were extracted from news outlets, media sources, or with the cast of authors, promoting their latest book. It’s just turning into another place for reading ads!

If one hasn’t been following the news of late (and it’s rather difficult to avoid since media seems to be everywhere), Facebook is being accused of taking advantage of this data they collected from others on their site and using it to influence elements such as the Brexit movement, the outcome from the 2016 presidential election, another other elements. There is even a boycott of Facebook with yet another campaign (sporting the ever lovin’ hashtag a.k.a. “#”) going around to leave Facebook for good! These elements became a far cry from when this place on the ‘net was the location to tell anyone about your hour/day/week, as well as posting pictures of your vacation/wedding/bat mitzvah/book signing, and other life milestone one may encounter.

As a disclaimer, we do maintain our presence on Facebook at facebook.com/AccessiblyLiveOffLine, as well as through other social media outlets. As to our fake characters, we had since forgotten about a number of these folks, but we still on occasion maintain two; Sherry Dunhurst of Calgary, Alberta, and the for noted Tiffi Purewhyte of Harrisburg, Illinois. (Look ‘em up!) As of this writing, Sherry received the maximum number of friends on her account at 5000. Tiffi has nearly 3000 friends, so you still request friendship or can just visit her to say “hi”. Just don’t expect to hear anything from her–or not right away anyway!

We don’t expect Facebook to ever get back to where they once were when we first discovered them. The ‘net, just like all media, has changed over time for the better or otherwise. Then again, there will be something else going down that will become the next big thing. Just check your social media portals to get the latest scoop. And don’t forget to use the hashtag!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

The Actors Co-op Theater Company of Hollywood closes out their 2017-18 season with VIOLET, a musical tale of a young woman who travels a distant journey seeking a physical healing, and the pair of military men she befriends along the way

The story begins in the Great Smokey Mountain region of western North Carolina where Violet (Claire Adams), a young woman who was born and raised in this region, suffered a hideous accent accident with an ax by having her face cut leaving a massive scar across her forehead and nose. That mishap occurred with when she was thirteen years old. It’s now September, 1964, and as a woman in her middle 20’s, she hears about a TV evangelist who preaches the power of healing. Desperate for getting her face the way it should be, she travels via Greyhound bus to Tulsa, Oklahoma where the preacher’s congregation is based to get herself healed. Along the way, she meets a pair of solders traveling to Ft. Smith, Arkansas: Monty (Morgan West) who is white, and Flick (Jahmaul Bakare), a negro. Flick, passing through an area where segregation fully remains although integration is (supposedly) the law, is aware of the suppression. But through her journey, Violet still pictures flashbacks between her younger self (played by Lily Zager), and her recently deceased father (John Allsop) from her misfortune and the keeping of her long deceased mother’s spirituality alive, still latching on to her catechism book kept from those years before. It’s the setting between a woman who clasps enough faith to become normal once more, and the two fighting men that hold their affection to this lass, regardless of her facial nonconformity.

This show piece with musical score by Jeanine Tesori and book/lyrics by Brian Crawley, takes its plot from the Doris Betts short story The Ugliest Pilgrim, and creates a tuneful saga with the title character that has kept her belief of becoming attractive, along with her self discovery through the aid of her father and the notions he taught her as a girl–such as how to draw cards playing poker in order to teach her ‘rithmetic so she won’t be shortchanged from grocery shopping! Her discovery continues by meeting the pair of Army men and how one of these GI’s Flick, as played by Jahmaul Bakare, encounters a “separate-yet-equal” attitude with others.

The ensemble of performers in this production keeps the pace moving throughout the performance. Its lead player Claire Adams as the elder Violet is very vibrant and is loaded with spark and energy through her vocalization and stage movement. Her “alter ego” character, the young Violet as portrayed by Lily Zager, matches her ability to keep the pace up in equal mode. Her two costars Morgan West and Jahmaul Bakare as Monty and Flick, have the voices that surpasses in what they can perform in this very robust and tight show.

And speaking of “tight”, the stage presentation is set within an intimate performance space, adding to the intimacy of this musical enhancing the “less is more” modus of theater. Julie Hall’s choreography fits in to the performance space allowed, and Richard Israel’s stage direction adds to the flavor. Nicholas Acciani’s set design shows a limited stage set that is minimized with a performance area only showing the seats of the bus Violet travels on along with a few furnishings that notes where the scenes are taking place. Hidden in the back is where its six piece orchestra resides, featuring Ellie Bunker on Violin, Thomas Lovasz on cello, Dominic White on guitar, Manuel Mendoza on bass, Jorge Zuniga on percussion. Taylor Stephenson performs on piano and provides the musical direction.

And adding to the above noted ensemble of cast members are Lori Berg, Benai Boyd, Patrick Cheek, Matthew Podeyn, Emuna Rajkumar, Kevin Shewey, and Lauren Thompson. These players appear in various roles that become part of Violet’s journey of finding the hope and salvation she strongly desires.

VIOLET is a musical whose score harks folk and gospel rhythms, along with contemporary tunes. It’s a solid show and of one that is fresh and original–perhaps a show that its audience can experience for the first time. That impression is refreshing as that stands!

VIOLET, presented by Actors Co-op Theatre Company, performs at The Crossley Theater, located on the campus of Hollywood First Presbyterian Church, 1760 North Gower Street (at Carlos Street), Hollywood, until June 15th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:30 PM. Special Saturday matinees takes place on May 19th and 26th at 2:30 PM. For ticket reservations or for more information, call (323) 462-8460, or through the website. (Below) The Actors Co-Op has just announced their lineup of shows for the 2018-19 season. A complete list of titles and its performance dates can be found at the theater company’s website at http://www.ActorsCoOp.org.
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Buzzworks Theatre Company presents the long awaited revival of Mae West’s SEX, the 1920’s hit comedy about a maiden of working girls that blows town for the Caribbean when things get hot for her while catering to a pair of suitors in the mists of juggling those that range from high society to low lifes, opens at Hollywood’s Hudson Mainstage Theatre.

Andrea Hutchman is Margy LaMont, a well-seasoned working gal that oversees a few other gals in the pleasure-for-hire biz in Montreal, a town where one can get legal hooch. She deals with the local hoods that come and go, if not greasing the palms of the law. Things become rather hot on the wire when an elder society matron attempts to frame her for a crime she didn’t commit. She goes on the lam to Trinidad where she meets Lt. Gregg (Wayne Widerson) an officer of the British Navy that has his own intentions for her. Then there’s Jimmy Stanton (Ryan Phillips), the son of a wealthy plantation owner who’s in town to oversee some of his dad’s spreads. Although both of them fall for the sex pot within her, Margy goes for Jimmy for what he has–not for the charm as Lt. Gregg possess, but for his loot! All it takes is her wits, along with what’s up front and a bit of her ass-ets! It’s not called “sex” for nothing!

This is the play, first presented on the stages of New York, that was written and stared Mae West, who in a short time would be signed by Famous Players (better known as Paramount Pictures) to star in a number of moving pictures that would make her one of the leading gals of comedy of the 1930’s. Even though this play was a hit, the New York City vice squad raided the theatre where West spend a little over a week in the pokey. But that was in the roarin’ 20’s where times were fast and loose, booze was ever flowing (never mind if the stuff wasn’t on the up-and-up legalwize), and the stock market was hotter that a two-dollar “sure win” bet at the track! This piece actually plays out as a genuine Mae West feature film, or at least a pre-code photoplay as there are a number of sexual innuendoes depicted that were titivating then. In today’s post-modern world, it’s somewhat campy. These elements make this show as seen very appealing as it speaks for a time where such visual entertainment vehicles can showcase such bits, while the movies had yet learn how to speak! As to the Buzzworks Theatre Company’s spin, Andrea Hutchman as Margy LaMont plays out her take of Mae West with classic forms of sex appeal. Wayne Wilderson as Lt. Gregg is the dark skinned (“colored”?) English naval officer that holds his suaveness that makes him vaguely English as in “God-Save-The-King” English! The rest of the ensemble that appear in this program feature (as listed in their alphabetical order), Peggy Brown, David Errigo, Lowam Yeas, Andrea Hutchman, Davey Johnson, Kandace Lindsay, Susan Edwards Martin, Ryan Phillips, and Carla Valentine, play multiple roles. Some of these roles last a bit while others just come and go. But that was how this play was created when frantic pacing was the standard method of comedy. Much of the comic stageworks appearing on Broadway then were just as fast such as the ones starring the five Marx Brothers as well as for the other comic teams and acts found on the vaudeville circuit!

When such period plays hosts visual aspects, they are worth a mention! Michael Flannery’s scenic design is rather minimal, but amusing, and Michael Mullen’s costuming that are all of the period it harks for!

Directed by Sirena Irwin, SEX is as fun as…you-know-what! It’s the bee’s knees, the cat’s pajamas, and is anything far removed of a piece of cheese! There are a lot of theatre shows that could be raided by the local vice squad as too much time progressed to make this show worth such a raid. But it’s still sexy and fun! It’s also just as historical as it’s historical! And Mae West couldn’t have said it better to suggest to come up and see her sometime, and that time is now! Crank up the Model T and head on over to good ol’ Hollywood. Better still, take the Red Car! (Hot-Cha!)

SEX, presented by the Buzzworks Theatre Company, performs at the Hudson Mainstage Theatre, 6539 Santa Monica Blvd. (at Hudson Avenue, off Wilcox Place), Hollywood, until June 17th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday evenings at 7:00 PM. Tickets can be obtained online at https://dime.io/events/buzzworks-sex, or at the Hudson Theatre boxoffice.
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
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@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
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#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2018 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said

A HOLE IN THE BUCKET LIST

The AARP, an organization that caters to those that are aged “50 and better”, has posted a number of articles about suggesting to their their members, or those within the group’s demographic, to experience a number of activities that they may have always wanted to do but never got around to it. These activities has been categorized as one’s “Bucket List”, a roster of events one must take part of before they “kick the bucket”. (i.e. die).

Over time and tide, some people that enter a stage in their life feel that they are getting slowly yet steadily reaching toward their grave. This usually occurs when somebody enters a new “decade” of life. (Reaching the age of 40, 50, and so on.) This method known as a “midlife crisis” tends to be more vocal in men, or so it seems as they tend to showcase it more than women. At least it’s presented in more dramatic means.

This form of episode in one’s life creates a sense of illusion that these folks entering a mature age can see it as a good notion or not. If it’s good, they leave things as they stand. If not, they sense that they must create that list of things to do and witness those elements before they croak. In various sitcoms and in feature films, the midlife crisis is portrayed with the person (again, usually a man) entering into a frantic state where they feel they have to drive that fancy sports car, dump the wife (these midlife crisis men are always married), for somebody much younger and hotter, and/or embark into a journey that rivals any action/adventure film of late, such as fighting alligators along the Amazon River, to parachute from an aircraft flying 10,000 feet above an African jungle, or to do some kind of stunt that people decades younger would never take part in, let alone even consider!

As exciting as it may sound, those bucket list folks never even get around in performing such feats of adventure or excitement. And according to a study created by Stanford University’s School of Medicine recently published in the Journal of Palliative Medicine, shows that there is a pattern in common themes that make up these lists of things to do and take part of before they call it quits for good.

Based upon polling some 3,056 American adults of age, some 78.5% did note that they wanted to travel to some exotic destination, such as Australia, China, or to tour Europe far different that a traditional tourist. (They would like to travel by bike than by tour bus). The same amount of responses wanted to accomplish a personal goal, such as writing a novel, completing a college degree, or competing in a sports related event.

From this point, these is where the so-called “real life” events start to kick in. 51% noted that they wanted to reach a specific milestone in their lives, such as experiencing an anniversary, a birthday, a wedding event, becoming a parent/grandparent, or some other element that is more domestic and realistic.

Nearly a quarter of replies were of a financial nature, such as paying off long term debts from a mortgage, credit card bills, and so on. 16% just wanted to spend more time with friends and family.

So how did those action/adventure antics come in? That ranked in last at 16.7%. It does take some form of bravery to shake off a midlife crisis by learning how to drive a NASCAR-type auto, or to go hang gliding over the White Cliffs of Dover.

Of course, not every person creates a bucket list of this caliber. Some people just want to get their own lives in order that others may tend to do without giving it much thought that has nothing to do with a stage in life. A few folks that are over the age of 55 just want to work in some kind of job that appreciates them for who they are and what they can do. People that are in their 20’s holds this same quest, but not treating it as a “bucket list” activity.

The AARP as a whole does perform a service that is for the good to those that cater to their needs. Their musings that they publish articles on through their website or by way of their publications inform their readers in doing something they have never done before exists as encouragement. It’s a far cry to the notes that once appeared in their magazine that was once called “Modern Maturity”, where it featured cute short stories, poetry stanzas, and such “news” on where to set sail on a cruse ship. Of course, those that AARP cater to in this day and age are the ever lovin’ Baby Boomers that discovered television, rock and roll, and learned to speak their minds to issues on what’s right and not let a government body dictate. They may be up and years, but they do make an effort to live with the times as long as the times and the powers that be allow such! They will continue to fill that to-do list through their own devices.

The rabbit didn’t kick the bucket quite yet! And that’s not all, folks!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

Performing at the Wallis Anneberg Center for the Performing Arts in Beverly Hills is BLUES IN THE NIGHT, a cabert-esque program featuring a selection of tunes that speak for the rhythm and the blues for a trio of women that call of love lost, found, and never were.

The setting is sometime in the 1930’s set within a cheap hotel found on Chicago’s south side. Three “colored” women that don’t call themselves with names dwell at this place. Yvette Cason is ‘The Lady From The Road’. Bryce Charles is ‘The Girl With The Date’, and Paulette Ivory is ‘The Woman Of The World’. They speak for their memories about living in a time where they have seen their love lives come and go. Their men did them good while a few done them wrong. Chester Gregory is called ‘The Man in the Saloon’, but serves as that man who was there on their good side and on their bad. But among this form of lying and loving, with cheating and faithfulness, each one sings about these times with that spark of jumpin’ and jivin’, along with a good dose of the blues to make it all work out in the end!

This program is yet another “jukebox musical” that takes a selection of jazz and R&B numbers from the 1920’s and 30’s, and blends them into a performance that give new life to these tunes (many well known with a few nearly long forgotten) that could fit within today’s landscape. The songs themselves, first made famous by such artists as Duke Ellington, Johnny Mercer, Bessie Smith, and a host of others, is presented in a style that is sparked with smooth and heavy jazz tones from the period where the music was heard and played in smoke filled rooms sparked from filterless cigarettes (or perhaps from tokeing on “wacky weed”), with heavy applications of cheap(er) booze to soak up the joint!

Although the plot of this show isn’t much to speak of, what makes this presentation appealing are the solid cast of four up-front performers. The three women, Yvette Cason, Bryce Charles, and Paulette Ivory, give their heart and soul into this work as they can belt out these tunes with the same effort and emotion that the songwriters had in mind. (Tunes made popular before the rock ‘n roll era stood out for the songs themselves, rather than for the artists that made ‘em famous!) Chester Gregory stands out as a man the represents the dude that was a lover, a player, and the one that did ‘em right and/or wrong! Backing up this group of performers/vocalists is the jazz band that plays out these same song numbers! Lanny Hartley conducts the band in addition to performing on keyboards, with Kevin O’Neal on bass, Randall Wills and Louis Van Taylor on reeds, Lance Lee on percussion, and Ferando Pullum on the horn. Chapman Robers provides the vocal arrangements and musical direction, with orchestration and additional vocal arrangements by Sy Johnson.

As to the visual elements seen on stage, Dana Rebecca Woods provides the costuming that represents the type of outfits donned by those from the R&B period of the 1930‘s. John Lacovelli’s scenic design shows the portions of the rooms these gals lived in at the hotel, complete that a facade consisting of a bland and well worn wall affixed with a hanging sign of the name of the hotel (called “Hotel”) with two street lamps in front. The jazz band performs in the rear of the darken stage area with a sign overhead that reads “Jazz”.

Sheldon Epps, long associated as the artistic director for The Pasadena Playhouse, conceived and directed this program that fits the title to this show. The blues that is called for isn’t anything that’s sad or depressing! In fact, it’s the total opposite! It’s moody, it’s lively, and it rings true to its namesake! Granted, it’s still a jukebox musical. But the rhythm and blues heard throughout comes from a jukebox that could be found in a jive juke joint that plays those records spinning at 78 RPM at a nickel a play–or six plays for a quarter! And that is a play that’s worth its nickel and spin. Sho’ ‘nuff!

BLUES IN THE NIGHT, performs at the Lovelace Studio Theatre within the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts complex, 9390 North Santa Monica Blvd. (between North Canon Drive and North Crescent Drive), Beverly Hills, until May 27th. Showtimes are Tuesday through Sunday nights at 8:00 PM, and Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2:30 PM. No evening show on Sunday, May 27th.

For ticket information, call (310) 746-4000, or via online at http://www.TheWallis.org/Blues
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The Morgan-Wixson Theatre of Santa Monica presents Marc Camoletti’s comic farce BOEING BOEING, a tale of a single man’s effort of juggling a trio of stewardesses for his romantic intentions, and the friend of his that gets mixed up with all of the camaraderie.

Doug Mattingly is Bernard. He’s an American architect living a bachelor in paradise lifestyle in Paris during the swinging 1960’s. He lives with his no-nonsense housemaid Berthe (Maria Pavone) that is quite used to his playing with a group of stewardesses that all serve as his fiancé, through he holds no real intention of marring any of them–let alone that neither one of them are even aware of the others! There’s the blond American Gloria (Chrissa Leigh Anderson) who flies with domestic airline TWA, Gabriella (Sonja Kovacevic) an Italian lass with Alitalia, and Gretchen, a German for Lufthansa. Thanks to Bernard’s careful juggling of each airline’s timetables, these gals meet with him on separate occasions. As one is scheduled to leave to take a flight, another one arrives on cue! While this is going on, Bernard receives a rather unexpected guest, an old buddy of his-Robert (Brian O’Sullivan), a humble yet slightly bumbling guy from America’s Midwest region. Robert is quite surprised of his buddy’s interesting love life, while Bernard just finds it all as part of his routine territory. That is, until each one of these women has their schedules altered thanks to the newer Boeing jets that move on a faster pace, when they arrive nearly at the same time only to complicate things!

This play was written by French playwright Marc Camolette in the early 1960’s during the hight of the “jet-set” methods of traveling by air. The play itself was later translated from the native French into English by Beverly Cross and Francis Evans that kept the same momentum as originally intended, reminiscent to the style of humanistic plays composed by another comic playwright from France, Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, a.k.a. Molière. This means there is plenty of frantic action complete with slapstick, pratfalls, and healthy doses of sexual innuendo that is more titillating in nature than offensive. The Mogan-Wixson version of this production rings true to these facts where the feverish action is non-stop! This form of stage presence is just as funny as the lines spoken by the cast of five. And each character as performed fits their bill down to the letter! Doug Mattingly as Bernard is the solid free-spirit that played each woman he knows as his own, never giving second thoughts to those not with him at that moment. Brian O’Sullivan as Robert is the typical man from the Midwest (Wisconsin) that doesn’t keep this type of lifestyle to where he hails from. (It’s mostly because of the cheese(?) Maria Pavone as Berthe is the housemaid that only does her job with minimal interest to what her employer does with his own life! And the three woman that have their own stage appeals is Chrissa Leigh Anderson (Gloria) as the perky blond, Sonja Kovacevic (Gabriella) as the signorina that holds a bit of Sophia Loren in her, while Kaylee Grace King as Gretchen playing the fräulein that prefers her romance a bit on the adventurous side! These character representations may be viewed as broad stereotypes, but each one is a funny broad stereotype thanks to Branda Lock’s stage direction! Her talents directing the cast on just what to do holds high to the quality upon what’s presented on stage!

And speaking of what is seen on stage, Tristan’s Griffin’s stage set of Bernard’s bachelor pad reeks of mid-century modern touches making this place appealing to keep a balance of rather pretty gals come and go as they fly. And Diana Mann’s costuming also holds within the same spirit of the era, dressing the stewardesses with their flight outfits that match the colors of the airlines they flew for!

Of course, one has to keep in mind that this play was created at a time where such depictions were created for comedy purposes, and was rather acceptable for the period. Today’s world is rather different now where some of the actions seen would not be fitting thanks to so-called political correctness. But with no offense granted to being “PC”, this play is still funny and is a hoot to experience, especially as seen on the Morgan-Wixson stage. And along with the humor, even flying ain’t what is used to be! Yesterday’s stewardesses as known today as “flight attendances”, and are no longer exclusively female! But enjoy the comedy and flavor that the previous generation left for the current crop of theater attendees to experience! It just wants to make one have a great time and may even want one to fly once again–and never mind of living on peanuts and soda pop as one’s in-flight meal! Get ready for take-off and enjoy the flight!

BOEING BOEING, presented by the Morgan-Wixson Theatre Guild, and performs at the Morgan-Wixson Theatre, 2627 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica, until May 27th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM. A special talk back session where the cast and crew discuss their performing as well as taking questions from the audience, occurs after the presentations held on Friday, May 11th, and Sunday, May 20th.

For more information as well as ticket reservations, call (310) 828-7519 or via online at http://www.Morgan-Wixson.org.
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
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@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com
#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2018 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!