I WANNA BE A ___ WHEN I GROW UP!

Within the realms of childhood, kids tend to see their world around them by way of the things and places they are exposed to. These exposers tend to be dictated and lead by way of the adults that are part of these kid’s domestic lives, from parents, caregivers, family members, friends of family, or other people that take responsibility for them until they turn the legal age when they become “adults” and can fend off for themselves.

In today’s post modern society, much of what kids are exposed to are based on what technology are made accessible to these kids, where they can see the world around them through a video screen of some sort. Some of these world views are not necessarily real or realistic. But much of it is based upon measurers that are nearly true and accurate that informs these kids on what is real, what is sort-of real, while the rest is up to them to pick and choose.

Younger kids (the pre-”tweeners”) may sense an idea to what’s there, while the “tweens” (age 8 through 13) and the teens (14 and up) are getting a major grasp to the elements that are there at their disposal, giving them a fast notion on what they are going to do among themselves once they hit adult age, and how they can carry on within their personal roles in society.

It’s rather obvious that social media, the element that they take advantage of because for those aged 18 and less, social media was always “there” for their amusement, gets these desires in check, while many of these’s kid’s parents/caretakers/people in charge either arranges encouragement for them, or at least sets guidelines on what they can have, and what they can wait for until their older.

In spite of this social communication available whenever they want and wherever they roam (assuming that there is wifi access found within their roaming spaces), many of these kids can decide what they want to do and how. To place it in classic terms, they still tend to say in more methods than one, “I wanna be a ___ when I grow up!”

If one is on the parent-esque track, chances are that the kids they look over are out of formal schooling for the summer. And in order to keep these kids as busy than ever, there is the option of sending their kids to summer camp. Sure, there are the traditional camps one would image based on the term “summer camp” with the usual visions of placing the kids in question on a plot located in a natural setting where these young’ins can hike, swim, fish, go boating, and other outdoors-y antics. Then there are the so-called “urban” camps that emphases upon a specific activity or skill, from the performing arts (theatre, music, dance, etc.) to something that will will prepare them into adult life, such as a trade that shows promise in the few years ahead.

Perhaps the bigger trends in an activity camp involves something that these kids totally know and love–technology! There are a number of these camps that places point into the STEM notions involving science, technologic aspects, math, and related elements that teaches these kids how to become a whiz, or bigger whiz, on anything that’s internet connected. These forms of camps are placed in an indoor setting (for the most part) and are set upon day camp structures. (No overnight stuff for the most part, unless the camp has a field trip to attend some high tech TED conference that’s rather kid friendly!) These kind of camps, totally nonexistent not so long ago, sets the pace on what these kids want to do or be when they indeed grow up, or at least when they physically grow up!

As this writer can only speak as a former kid but not as a parent, caretaker, or an adult that has others under the age of eighteen within his life, this notion only calls for what is known based upon second and third party status. All that this writer can note is to present in a fuddy-duddy fashion, what it was like as a kid long before I was able to vote, legally operate a car, or to other stuff that was for “grownups” only! (Don’t worry folks! I’ll be brief!)

When yours truly was under the age of consent, I kinda knew what I wanted to be, while at the same time, I had no idea what I desired to place myself within this cold cruel world I was existing in! I was just living in the present time for the present time. There was no “future” per se. The only future I knew of was the stuff I would see in science fiction flicks where, depending on the movie, consisted of space travel, lots of bright colored electronic devices that glowed, and space ships that featured robot voices (usually in a female sounding tone) warning those on board on the space ship that the vessel was going to blow up in three minutes! As for summer camp, or any kind of camp, that was out of the question. My summer activities outside of school did involve technology–watching lots of TV! While other kids would have their parents send them off to Camp Hiawatha or some other camp with an Indian name (“Native American” was a term that didn’t come around until the middle 1990’s, and this antidote occurred long before that time), yours truly parked himself in front of a 12” Sony black & white TV set to catch up on daytime television, mostly in the form of game shows. And since weekday evenings were not “school nights”, I could stay up later turning in to old movies that were on the late-late show. As I became an adolescent, there were a mix of old movies and late night talk shows where everyone from Dick Cavett to Tom Snyder would entertain me with their thought provoking interviews with guests I knew of, and a few I never knew existed.

However, take heed of the kids of today. When they say that they want to be a something or another, they know what they are doing since they can “google”, follow a tweet, or to Snapchat their way to grab the low down of what’s who and where, all without the notion of being in a FOMO state.
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NEWS AND REVIEWS
Theatre 40 of Beverly Hills opens their 2017-18 season of theatre shows with the west coast premier of Arun Lakra’s SEQUENCE, a play that is about genetics, probability, spiritual faith, and good old fashioned dumb luck as witnessed between a pair of material subject experts and the two that follow and question their existence.

The experts on hand are Dr. Guzman (Maria Spassoff) and Theo (Gary Rubenstein). These two start out on a presentation to a group that speaks upon their individual theories. Theo’s speciality is how he created a mathematical succession on fate and luck. He wrote a book on the subject as well as gaining fame on betting massive double-or-nothing amounts over the coin toss on The Super Bowl, winning for twenty years in a row. Dr. Guzman’s is a professor of stem cell research that is near the verge of a major discovery that can assist a massive population over yet to be cured genetic illnesses. Two people in attendance to this lecture hold their separate desires to meet Theo and Dr. Gutman’s over their own issues. Adamson (Crash Buist), a student of Dr. Gutman’s, makes a late night call to her lab in the basement of the university building she studies at. Adamson is confined to a wheelchair due to a childhood illness and a physical accident. Cynthia, baring child, meets Theo at his domain. Both of these young people have something to offer these experts within their elements, while the experts discover that these pupils may hold the key into their ideals, resulting upon an invisible conflict between the secrets of DNA research, the probabilities of how things occur and why, and the aspects of what really comes first? Is it an egg, a chicken, or neither–or both?

This play written by Arun Lakra, a medical physician turned playwright based in Calgary, Alberta, takes upon subjects as fate probabilities, stem cell breakdowns, statistical logic, the faith of God and/or its equivalents, as well as why and how people have all the luck while others don’t, blending all of these components into a tight one-act play that never keeps its pacing to falter. Told in a staggering motion where the four characters only meet as pairs: Dr. Guzman with Adamson, and Theo and Cynthia, this foursome never cross one’s paths although they speak and banter over similar theories and contentions, bringing upon conclusions over what they look upon one another or otherwise. The four players that appear in this stage piece keep the momentum going thanks to Bruce Gray’s stage direction. For some eighty-five minutes, the dialogue and actions will keep the audience into a suspenseful spellbound upon the subject matters as addressed!

Jeff Rack, Theatre 40’s residential set designer, completes a stage set that is relativity simple, consisting of a lab table located on stage left nestled with glass beakers and other items found in science halls, a 20 foot ladder on stage right (it functions as more than a lowly prop), and a floating traditional blackboard where Dr. Guzman, Theo, et. al, illustrate their notions in the same fashion as any professor of knowledge would do in a classroom-type setting.

SEQUENCE discusses a lot within its rather short running time. In spite of performing at slightly under an hour and a half, one won’t feel that time shortchanged the concepts to what they play is all about. In fact, this tense moment’s span only brings every detail into its own perceptive. It even opens a number of debates to ponder upon once the play reaches its conclusion. Not many plays out there can boast that notion, making it as entertaining and informative under one virtual flip of the theater coin!

SEQUENCE, presented by Theatre 40 and performs at the Reuben Cordova Theatre, located within the campus of Beverly Hills High School, 241 South Moreno Drive (off little Santa Monica Blvd.) Beverly Hills, until August 20th. Showtimes are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM.

For ticket reservations or for more information, call (310) 364-0535, or via online at http://www.Theatre40.com
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The Sierre Madre Playhouse presents for their summer showcase, THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES, a musical romp where a quartet of friends in high school perform as their own vocal group at their senior prom, as well as at their high school reunion a decade later.

The scene opens at the 1958 Springfield High School prom. Four “bestie” friends, consisting of Betty Jean (Kate Ponzio), Missy (Afton Quast), Suzy (Kelly Klopocinski), and Cindy Lou (Kelsey Boze), have been asked by their favorite teacher Mr. Lee to perform as the prom’s entertainment as “The Marvelous Wonderettes”, their vocal group that musically achieves in the same musical tones akin to The McGuier Sisters, The Chordettes, and many of the other female vocal groups that dotted the hit parade. Dressed in their full skirted “party” dresses, they sing, dance (or actually, gesture in place), while carrying on through their show with some innocent bickering as noted on stage. (After all, they are high school girls!) Then the scene shifts to their ten year reunion in ‘68. The fashions have changed as they no longer don the frilled party dresses of yesteryear. Each one wears bright patterned trim line outfits with a boa accent while they sing the tunes of that period–the 1960’s! The songs, as well as Betty Jean, et. al., show that they have lost a bit of their innocence, but not as much as one would assume. Now the girls-turned-women have since experienced an adult life, taking some of its ups as well as the downs. In spite of these changes, they sing the tunes that speak for the times in addition with keeping up on their high school age aura as experienced at their humble alma mater.

This showpiece, written and conceived by Roger Bean, is a tribute to the songs of both the 1950’s and 60’s, as well as the notion that “BFFs” can remain such a set synced to a musical soundtrack. The four players featured in this show perform very well within their ensemble, as each one focuses upon their character and personality–both musically and laden with comical overtones. As to the music itself, such songs as Mr. Sandman, Sugartime, Lollipop, and many others are covered from this era. In act two where the reunion take place, the songs get a bit earthy. Said tunes as Rescue Me, Respect, Son of a Preacher Man, and many other added pieces are heard and performed that keeps this program at its lively pace. Robert Marra directs and choreographed this presentation that always maintains a lively persona, even when the foursome are bantering between musical interludes.

Outside of the songs and the four that sing and act within, what also make this presentation enjoyable is what is actually seen on stage. A. Jeffrey Schoenberg’s costuming highlights the era, from the fluffy prom dresses in various shades of pink, yellow, and blue, to the stylized 60‘s-era outfits, showing that these girls have indeed grown up! Jessica Mills’ wig designs add to the period flavor, too! The set design by Jeff Cason consists of a performance floorboard setting, first as a 50’s prom layout, to a ten year reunion place complete with a tinsel lined curtain as its background. (Derek Jones created the lighting design as well!) And Sean Paxton’s musical direction carries on the intervals that these girls/woman harmonize to. The orchestra, set behind the set unseen to its audience, consists of Paxton on keyboards, Mike Flick on bass, Kevin Tiernan on guitar, and Jayden Saldana on percussion.

Roger Bean is a playwright based in the Los Angeles area that is known to create “jukebox musicals”; shows that takes upon a plot and builds that story around existing songs, making the presentation as a new production using familiar tunes that fit among its presence. Currently, a Bean production is currently making its rounds in town, The Andrews Brothers (See review: Vol. 22-No. 28), as well as his latest creation, Honky Tonk Laundry that will perform in Hollywood in August. One can never go wrong with such a musical showcase, and the Sierre Madre’s presentation of THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES fits that bill to its “T”. Older tunes never seem to go out of style as they just get better over time and tide.

THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES, presented by and performs at The Sierre Madre Playhouse, 87 West Sierre Madre Blvd, Sierre Madre, until August 27th. Showtimes are Friday amd Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 2:30 PM. Special Saturday afternoon performances will take place on August 12th, 19th, and 26th at 2:30 PM.

For more details or for ticket reservations, call (626) 355-4318, or via online at http://www.SierreMadrePlayhouse.org
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

IS _____ DYING OR DEAD?

This is a type of headline that’s been appearing in news stories over the past few periods of time when some kind of shift of either doing business of living in some form of domestic lifestyle has changed in the recent times that questions the previous method on how its motions take their course.

Much of this shift of an existence has to do with the ever changing methods on how technology is making things smaller, faster, and cheaper–or a variation thereof. These things can either be in the form of physical objects, or of a system to perform a task or service. This task can be through for monitory gain (i.e. a business), or declared as a basic function, such as consuming video programming. The new techniques are always first raved as the “latest thing” that will become the be-all-to-end-all, and the question if the classic style will become doomed to reach its end cycle of existence.

Since the beginning of the 21st century, this notion of the changing on how things get done has increased in droves. This form of new processes creates an illusion that when somebody or something holds an idea on how to proceed on a method that currently exists or how to create an advanced practice of an element that might be new altogether, then the old way is considered as a plot to send it off to its grave. It doesn’t matter what this thing may be. If the new(er) way is indeed smaller, faster, and cheaper, then that is how it’s going to be! The end!

However, these predictions of “___ is dead! Long live ___!” is far from new. In fact, that battle cry of the new way being born and the old way declared as dead and gone has been around for longer than one may realize. It’s been around for the past 150 years since the period called “the industrial age” captured its foothold in domestic society as recorded for generations to either marvel about, or to scratch their heads with total confusion.

Perhaps the first takehold of these every changing ways in life that involves technology came around in the 19th century when the telegraph made its mark. This form of communication that consisted of dots and dashes clicked on a telegraph key was first thought as how written messages would be soon obsolete. For some sources, perhaps. But for most of the population, no! When the telephone came into the scene not too many years after the telegraph, it was believed that letter writing would come to its end because folks would not compose a letter, but to replace those personal notes with a phone call. That might have been so, but since phone service in those early days were rather expensive for what it was, let alone dicy in terms of reach and quality of transmission, it would not become a standard method of communication until the 1920’s. Not everyone had access to a phone, so letter writing continued.

So did newspapers around that time when that device called “radio” made its entry. Again, radio receivers were not cheap either, so getting news and information wasn’t available to everyone. Besides, newspapers carried photos and illustrations. Radio couldn’t and didn’t. That is, until television finally got its act together after the end of World War II. In spite of the fact that one can see pictures along with its sound, it was better than radio! And with a TV set, one didn’t have to go to the movies for such visual entertainment and thus, gave the movie studios their first real threat. The same went for the theatre operators that showed those moving pictures. No movies, no theaters!

When Sony introduced its Betamax video cassette recorded in the middle 1970’s, along with JVC’s version of the beta format, the video home system (VHS), people would be able to watch movies at home on video cassette, and no longer head off to movie theaters. The VCR’s fate was in place when the digital video disk (DVD) came around at the near end of the 20th century, By the time the 21st century progressed, so did the method of watching movies by something called “ video streaming”, where one can watch movies at home using a system that can duplicate a movie theatre. Mainly, a big screen TV with a booming sound system.

Using the above timeline as a guide, did the new method vs. the old method really cause a “death” of an old medium? That answer is a simple “yes and no”! When radio came about, it didn’t replace newspapers. When TV made its entrance, did radio and the movie industry totally go away? What about the rise of home entertainment via videocassette and DVD? Did it make movie theaters extinct? The same story for streaming movies and later TV shows on electronic devices? Where are the movie theaters and cable TV connections? (Cable TV wasn’t really discussed in this article, but you get the idea!)

Newspapers, radio, television, movies and movie theaters, as well as the afterthought mention of cable are still around to this very day. Granted, their method of service and existence has changed. Some of that change was more for some mediums than others, but they are as a whole still alive and kicking!

It would be totally drastic to have some element become declared as dead in the same method as a person being declared as deceased. A person might be in a state where they are slowly dying, but remains alive nevertheless. When they totally die, they are gone never to return! Radio may no longer be the prime source for entertainment as it was from the 1920’s through the 1960’s with programming was presented in some kind of dramatic method, but its still here! Newspapers may be concentrating on delivering information online, but most, through not all, text based news sources still creates a print version. Movies and the theaters that showcase them are also alive and living as well. Again, they may not be what they were from a generation before, but are still there for public consumption.

So the next time one reads or hears something about a source or medium that is announced as “dead”, take that information for what it is. It’s not totally gone, it’s just changed! It may take a very long time for that element to disappear if at all. By the time it becomes completely extinct, chances are that that method had since been long forgotten, meaning that very few, if anyone at all, will even notice! How many of you out there wonder whatever became of the gas lamp lighters, the seltzer bottle fillers, or the elevator operators that were once part of the domestic landscape? Anyone really cares for not using buggy whips anymore, or washboards to clean your starched shirts and bloomers? Yep, we thought so!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

ANY NIGHT, a play by Daniel Arnold & Medina Hahn that takes its setting upon a relationship between an apartment dweller and its caretaker sprouting within hidden worlds that are imagined or real, makes its Los Angeles premiere as a guest production at the Sacred Fools Theatre in Hollywood.

Marie Fahlgren and Zac Thomas are featured as Anna and Patrick. Anna is a teacher of dance at a nearby studio. Zac is a media tech who maintains an apartment space in an urban location. Anna is interested in moving into an available unit as she attempts to escape a previous relationship. Patrick serves as the landlord by default, as the place is owned by an elderly woman that Patrick has known for much of his life. Upon her settlement at the place, Anna undergoes some flashbacks to previous episodes from her past that serve as nightmares. Patrick, becoming aware of Anna’s flashbacks, makes note to look after her as a measure of concern and safety. At first, the two are distant, but a trust slowly develops that brings them closer. But this form of bonding is not something that appears to settle on the surface. Is Anna discovering a hidden life that she is finally taking grips with? Is Patrick’s concern over her well being moving toward a new level? And does he hold a hidden life that might be real or one that is just as mysterious as Anna’s?

This one act play takes upon a number of issues between two souls that possess personal backgrounds, teetering between tangible and imagery, while attempting to live their moments as a standard couple, blending professional concept (tenant/landlord), personal moments (man/woman/friendship/lovers), and those that speak for a subconscious state of being-past, present, and future. Playwrights Daniel Arnold & Medina Hahn creates a stage abstraction that adds every one of these episodes, never letting the pace and tension to ever settle. The farther the play progresses, the more complex it gets. The pair of performers, Marie Fahlgren and Zac Thomas, are very likable once they step into their characters only for their roles to change. They keep up to their places throughout with a sense of sprit and grace. Between selected sets, they place forward dance movements as choreographed by Erica Gionfriddo that add the only form of calmness between the Anna and Patrick roles. When the two are not involved within the elements of dance, Elizabeth V. Newman’s stage direction take over, making this stage work as fiery, leading up to its climatic conclusions.

In this showcase seen within its ninety minute run are the backdrops as designed by set decorator Vanessa Montano, consisting of a background “wall” comprised of white mesh materials that could represent a mist or cloud, while metal pieces built as a wall or partition are placed on stage left/right representing the units that Anna and Patrick dwell. These pieces may look like junk welded together at first, but hold more presence to such. It’s more of a sense of an urban landscape between the two and their open and subconscious connection they dominate between each other and themselves.

With the title of this work being as ANY NIGHT, one may believe that this play is another romantic comedy one would find through the standard media landscape. That theory is far removed from that concept as it shows more undertaking within what’s being close through physical, emotional, and psychological standpoints as each element serves with equal respect to the other. This is a production that is worth its good look.

ANY NIGHT, presented by The Filigree Theatre and EVN Productions, both of Austin, Texas, performs at The Sacred Fools Theatre space, 1076 Lillian Way at the corner of Lillian Way and Santa Monica Blvd., one block west of Santa Monica Blvd. and Vine Street, Hollywood, until July 30th. Showtimes are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 5:00 PM.
For ticket reservations or for more information, visit http://www.AnyNightAustin.com.
Also visit The Filagree Theatre at http://www.FilagreeTheatre.com, and EVN Productions at http://www.EVNProductionsATX.com

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The Write Act Repertory presents the world premier of Joni Ravenna’s BLINDED, a black comedy of a “blind” man, his headshrinker, and a pair of women undergoing an affair of sorts.

Chris Muto is Donald Stark. When he was a lad of eighteen, he discovered that his mother was having an affair in bed with another person. This lead to a trauma where he lost sight in his eyes, leading to a psychosomatic caused blindness. Many years later as an early-middle aged adult, Donald’s well being has taken its toll. Coming toward his edge, he attempts to “see” a psychologist, Dr. Bob Silveroni (Rico Simonini). Instead of writing more prescriptions for Donald, Dr. Bob has an idea. He requests that Don carry on an affair with his wife Bridget (Cindy Marinangel). The reason for this odd sounding request is because Dr. Bob is having his own affair with his “nurse”, Cheila (Mariyn Sanabria), a Puerto Rican spitfire type. While Donald visits Bridget at her apartment, he plays a role as a French teacher that can see as Bridget doesn’t know of his “illness”. It’s a comical tale of a love triangle that isn’t triangular, square, or any form of shape! It’s a function to cover up one fling with another!

This humorous play by Joni Ravenna takes upon a string of tragic episodes and makes it more of a satirical farce than a joke-upon-joke of a comedy. The cast of four in this play are as just as comical as the material they are working with. Out of the four players that appear in this production, Rico Simonini as Dr. Bob and Marilyn Sanabria stand out comic wise, as Dr. Bob is more of a snide con-artist than a professional headshrinker, while Cheila is a hot-to-trot mucho caliente chica that is coming close to being past her prime–although Cindy Marinangel’s character as Bridget already reached her expiration date–the reason to Dr. Bob’s chili pepper laden affair! (Chris Muto is Donald Stark is amusing, but that’s about it!) T. J. Castronovo directs this comedy with a load of humorous flair that gives the show with what it’s got!

One can’t be wrong with a comedy that is based upon romantic flings that go amuck. BLINDED is one of those examples, as set within a production that’s tight in its running time at around ninety minutes or so, not counting the intermission! That’s enough minutes for all of the hidden secrets to become exposed, leading to its lighter hearted conclusions.

BLINDED, presented by the Write Act Repertory and performs at the BrickHouse Theatre, 10950 Peach Grove Street, one block north of the intersections of Camarillo, Lankershim, and Vineland streets, North Hollywood, until August 13th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM. For ticket reservations and for more information, call (800) 838-3006, or via http://www.BrownPaperTickets.com/event/2993431.
Visit the Write Act Repertory online at http://www.WriteActRepTheatre.org, or through Facebook at http://www.Facebook.com/WriteActRepertory

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

THE TV SOCIAL LANDSCAPE

In a previous issue (Vol. 22-No. 26), this writer composed a column of how the summer season was the time where new and appealing television programming took their “summer vacation”, as well as the viewers associated with watching TV.

Thanks to this post-modern era (i.e. “now”), much of the programming seen exists by getting the word around on a specific series through means outside of basic “word of mouth”. And getting that word across is used through the ever presence of social media where viewers (“fans” in this case), can provide commentary about the show, the episode(s) they looked at, the characters featured and those performers that play them, as well as other bits and pieces they can spit out through a wall post or via worlds under 140 letters.

Platforms as Facebook and Twitter lead the pack when it comes to TV show viewpoints and others that “join the conversation”. And the folks behind Nielsen’s Social Content Ratings bureaus, tallied up the top ten program titles that received the most exposure from the now completed 2016-17 media season. Some 2.8 billion social interactions through Facebook and Twitter were recorded that noted about TV programs that ran through all of the media platforms. This tally includes both scripted television as well as live events such as sport matches and award programs that ran from the beginning or September through the end of May.

AMC’s The Walking Dead received the most mentions from this year, averaging about 2028 interactions per episode. These interactions start when the episode is viewed, and continues long after the episode concluded. (This tally is limited to programs seen within the traditional one installment per week mode, rather than releasing an entire season all at once i.e. streaming via Netflix, Hulu, etc.)

Fox’s Empire falls into second place where it received an average of 860 interactions per episode. The Bachelor, ABC’s long running series is in third place. The program received some 453 interactions when aired during and after. NBC’s biggest hit of the year, the melodrama series This Is Us is in forth place, coming in at 436 posts and tweets. VH1’s Love & Hip-Hop: Atlanta in next in the ranking at 406 per installments.

Rounding out the remaining five is The Voice on NBC, WWE Monday Night Raw on USA is at sixth ranking, followed by NBC’s Saturday Night Live. the generic version of VH1’s Love & Hop Hop, and FX’s American Horror Story: 6 completes the top ten.

As to live events, the 56th Grammy Awards airing on CBS came in first place. ABC’s airing of the 89th Academy Awards came in at number two, fueled by and from the moment where the wrong title was declared the winner for best picture, The Golden Globe Awards on NBC came in next, followed by The Billboard Music Awards on ABC.Dick Clark’s Rockin’ New Year’s Eve also on ABC was next (the only title that wasn’t an awards show). The Primetime Emmy Awards came in at seventh place. And rounding out the remaining three was the Miss Universe pageant, BET’s Hip-Hop Awards, and the 52nd Academy of Country Music Awards on CBS.

Much of this wall posting, tweeting, et. al. was indeed generated by viewers. However, the social media traffic of the programs in question were based on encouragement through the video networks and/or production companies that inviting viewers and fans to do their social media thing. Every one of the titles listed above have program generated places on all of the media platforms were folks can share something to others that might take a glance at it. Generally stating, the more accessible and inviting it is for viewers and/or fans to post, tweet, et. al., the more it will become mentioned within the social media landscapes.

In the next issue, yours truly will give a condensed rundown on how TV shows became part of the rants and raves through pure gossip where friends would tell friends who would tell friends of friends about a program that was worth taking a look at–not necessary finding the program good nor great! It was part of how news got around a natural and organic way. Stay tuned!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

The Glendale Center Theatre presents for their mid-summer showpiece, THE ANDREWS BROTHERS, a jukebox musical set at a military base somewhere in the south Pacific where a USO show almost didn’t happen until a set of brothers stepped in for a trio of performing sisters who share the same name but not necessarily shared the same talents!

It’s 1945. World War II is at its waining years. At a military camp located within the Pacific theater finds three siblings, Patrick (Jason Webb, Lawrence (Patrick Foley), and Max (John David Walles) Andrews, working as stage hands for the USO shows that come in to entertain the boys stationed there. All three wanted to do their part fighting for the cause, but their various ailments made them as “4-F”: military lingo for rejects due to medical conditions. They are getting ready to set up their next show featuring The Andrews Sisters. As a back up in the show is Peggy (Colette Peters), a well known “pin-up” girl whose pictures became part of the servicemen’s “eye candy”. Before long, a cable is received. One of the Andrews Sisters catches a contagious disease. They all must be quarantined and thus, can’t appear! Fast thinking Peggy has a plan. Have the Andrews Brothers play as The Andrews Sisters making the show go on as planned. Since the brothers Andrews knows all of the musical parts, they’re perfect as replacements, assuming nobody ever see them all up close! It’s all connected as doing their duty for the war effort!

This high spirited musical, written and conceived by Roger Bean, is a musical salute to those songs that were on the hit parade while the world was at war. Every tune performed and sung were extracted from this part of the great American songbook when everyone was doing their bit, either on the battlefields or on the home front. The four players in this show have all of their comical talents at bay. There is plenty of comedy and signing to be found within this production, along with its dance steps as well, choreographed, staged, and directed by Orlando Alexander & Danny Michaels. The vocal and musical arrangements by Roger Bean, Michael Broth, and John Newton with Steven Applegate’s transcribed musical direction, brings those tunes from not so long ago back to life. Many are well know from the era, (“Don’t Sit Under The Apple Tree”, “G. I Jive”, etc), and a few that make their comeback for their stage moment! Along with Vicki Conrad’s costume design that depicts the WWII era, it makes it all as a charming showcase for those that recall this period of the 20th century, or for those that learned about it through second hand sources.

This is the first time that the GCT has ever staged this show, and its debut here all works out as it’s just as ideal to see it in its theater-in-the-round position, one of the few stage theatres in the region that can offer such a setting. THE ANDREWS BROTHERS is tight, lively, and a whole lot of fun! That is what stage musicals are really all about, and should be!

THE ANDREWS BROTHERS, presented by and performs at the Glendale Centre Theatre. 324 North Orange Street, Glendale, until August 12th. Showtimes are Friday, and Saturday evenings at 8:00 PM, and Saturday matinees at 3:00 PM. Additional performances take place on Thursday, July 13th and 20th at 8:00 PM, with Sunday matinees performing on July 16th, 23rd, and 30th at 3:00 PM.
For more information and for ticket reservations, call (818) 244-8481, or visit the GCT’s web site at http://www.GlendaleCentreTheatre.com

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THE RABBI’S MISSION, Art Shulman’s new play about the title Rabbi and the two women he juggles in his life, opens at North Hollywood’s T.U. Studios theatre.

Paul Michael Nieman is Rabbi Jacob, or rather, the former Rabbi Jacob. He stepped down from his duties of being the spiritual leader of a local temple and now performs his new duties at a nearby rescue mission. His old friend Al (Stan Mazin) comes to Jacob to ask for some advice. It seems that his adult aged son David (James Haley) is presently involved with a woman who is not of the Jewish persuasion, and wonders what he should do.

Upon meeting this woman, Marci (Shalonda Shaw, alternating with Barika A. Croom), he finds her very charming, knowing that she would be best for David in spite of the different cultures.

Meanwhile, Jacob meets another woman named Theresa (Rebecca Westberg) who was once involved with Jacob after his wife passed on. Although they are both on good terms, it brings a bit of strife. But being the spiritual leader as he was, he can determine the good of what’s going on, balancing this situation.

This play, written and directed by local playwright Art Shulman, performs as a rather light and somewhat humorous soap opera. There aren’t any such plot points that would make it as a heavily laden drama, but much of what is depicted would come across as realistic slices of domestic life. The action is presented within its dialogue, creating a rather talky play. But the talk is more within the realms of deep verbiage rather than idle chatter and thus, what is being expressed flows throughout. There isn’t any padded conversation that some stage plays tend to use when it’s the moment to stretch out a scene or three.

The cast of six players, including Mazin as Al, who is depicted as a “Jewish Cowboy” that rides in the “vild vild west”, is a set that shows their characters as humble. They all depict themselves as people of good that still possess their lighter touches.

Although this play is billed as a comedy, the humor found isn’t of the sitcom variety, meaning that everyone has to spit out a one-liner or three, nor there isn’t a joke told within every turn. It’s presented as more of a comical aspect than anything else.

J. Kent Insay, who appears as Richard, provides the set and lighting design that creates an intimate setting; nothing lavish, but enough to present itself as a detailed stage space.

Art Shulman has created a number of plays that have performed in the region for some twenty years. Many of these plays has been seen and reviewed by this writer over those same years. THE RABBI’S MISSION is a hearty play that is amusing, heartfelt, and will even give one a crash course on basic Judea, even enough for a gentile to understand!

THE RABBI’S MISSION, performs at the T.U. Studios, 10943 Camarillo, east of the intersections of Lankershim, Vineland, and Camarillo, North Hollywood, until August 27th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM. For ticket reservations or for more information, call (818) 285-8699, or via online at http://www.TheRabbisMission.com

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS

As with the traditional start of our fiscal year, we take the time to present our report on how this newsletter series progressed since the beginning of our season to the end of that same period, generally stating between July 1st, 2016 through June 30th of this year.

First and foremost, we have seen circulation up within the previous twelve months. Since July 1st, our traffic through our website has increased by 10%. We are gaining more “hits” through our http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com presence on the web. The increase of traffic was boosted from late November and continued through the spring season. Many of our “hits” came from mobile devices in the form of smartphones and tablets, with the biggest increase came from phone devices. Laptop/desktop access has fallen just a tad and tables remained slightly up. But it appears that having our readers take hold upon us have reached a point where phone devices rule. No matter where you may be in this world, so are we, just as long as those readers has access to an internet connection. And judging upon how the ‘net is the be-all-to-end-all, that’s nearly anywhere and everywhere!

Our traditional newsletter sent via e-mail was held rather steady. Although circulation on that version remained flat, we continue to provide the standard news and reviews that had made us present on and through the web for the past twenty one years.

As to other notions, our parent company, Linear Cycle Productions, recently revamped its website. Anyone that visits up on the web at
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com will discover what we also preform in terms of multimedia applications. This is a service that we have provided from some time, and now this service is being offered to those that hold the strong need to complete. Not only one can find out on what we do, but one can also find links to Accessibly Live Off-Line, and through our presence on our YouTube Channel viewing back episodes of Accessibly Live, a program that was produced in the latter 1980’s and early 1990’s. We are also going through our media archives to post additional episodes of this long running series, as well as a few other surprises! Stay tuned for further developments.

Social media is alive and living. Our Twitter account @ACCESSIBLYLIVE posts when our latest edition hits the streets, and our Facebook page at http://www.Facebook.com/AccessiblyLiveOffLine is gaining new “friends” on a regular basis. Stop in during your next Facebook visit to say “hello”! (And speaking of Facebook, our fake entries we created a few years ago are still on the air with one of them having 5000 “friends”-the maximum limit one can have on Facebook outside of being a “liked” person!)

On a side note, this writer is also involved with a company that became officially established within the previous year: Archive Estate Sales, LLC, a full service provider of the sale and liquidation of household goods and personal effects found in domestic homesteads within the Los Angeles and surrounding areas. For more details on that company, visit http://www.ArchiveEstateSales.com

That is where he have been since our last report. As to where we are going? Of course, we will continue to provide the standard service we create as to what our readers want and desire. This is a farer notion from other sites that carry news that also provide video links to something that is reverent to what’s being reported. Although the larger media companies post video content created by the company in question, most of the other sources post content that came from somewhere else. That’s all good for what that is. But to keep things pure and simple, we place the news that only matters. If we do have access to original content that isn’t necessarily archive material, then we will post such. The moving imagery of older and perhaps “classic” stuff will remain on our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w

  That’s what has been going on within the past year. However, we still welcome your input and encourage everyone to add their comments on this news service, or any other source noted in this report. Drop us a line at Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com, or through AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com. For you spammers out there, send your note(s) to 0602020@gmail.com. Granted, we may not read your reply, but at least you have a place to send your intentions! After all, we do want to grab a piece of that million dollars found in a shoebox near Upper Volta that you are willing to share with us! Who’s going to pass up an offer for free money anyway, hah??
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

Because of the holiday weekend, there are no reviews this issue. Stay tuned for more reviews coming you way within the next few weeks! See you then!
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
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(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com
#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

TV IN THE SUMMERTIME

Once upon a time back in the days when television was received via an indoor or outdoor antenna and for the most part was available for free, viewing the tube during the summer months didn’t have the same priory as it did during the rest of the year. Between September of one year through May of the next, much of the programming that was made available during the “prime time’ viewing hours, usually between the period of 8:00 PM to 11:00 PM (or 7:00 PM through 10:00 PM in the central time zone), consisted of the standard mix of dramas, police shows, situation comedies, variety programs featuring comedy, musical numbers, or both, with the occasional sporting event as well as a news/information/documentary title thrown in for balance. These evening hours was the time when the most amount of viewers would be tuning in for their choice of home based visual entertainment.

During the summer months, generally between Memorial Day (or staring in 1971, the Memorial Day weekend) through the Labor Day weekend, many people would be spending their evening hours outdoors, not only to take advantage of the better weather, but to spend the time in longer daylight hours.

Many of the networks (three actually) knew through their programming departments that ratings–the measured amount of viewers that would be turning into a specific program during a specific time period, would normally drop during the summer months. Another reason for the drop was due to the selection of programming offered since there would be plenty of reruns. Shows that were on would’t be offering a new collection of episodes until September, assuming that the program was even going to return. And there was the program that was called the “summer replacement”. This was a program that had a built-in short shelf life where only a handful of episodes would run, and once September kicked in, the title would be off the air, never to return. Many of these summer replacements consisted of comedy/variety shows that were easy to produce (for what they were) and didn’t necessarily have any continuity. The summer replacement title can begin anytime, and end at any moment without the notion that the series has some plot point that had to be resolved by its conclusion.

Now this writer is speaking for summer TV long before the modern elements of TV viewing started to kick in, mostly in the form of cable TV and home video. Programming on cable TV always lagged behind in terms of quality and content compared to what the three networks can offer. This was due to budgeting since ABC, CBS, and NBC can afford to pay for better shows than, let’s say, what the USA Network, WTBS, WGN, etc. can offer. So those cable channels were not under the same pressure to provide better programming in the summertime, or anytime for that matter! It was just quantity of viewing choices rather than quality. The premium, or “pay” cable channels such as HBO, Showtime, and the like, offered recent uncut feature films, with an occasional original program added for balance and for “filler”. But that choice of programming was offered throughout the year, so that didn’t effect the summer viewing much. Besides, people through that if they were paying some $14.00 or so dollars a month just to receive HBO, etc., they might as well take advantage to what they were paying for! And if they could not watch a title when it aired, the ol’ VCR took care of that.

In today’s video world where TV is literary everywhere, one can watch whatever content they want when they felt like it, summertime or otherwise! And since new programming choices begin their run when the video provider is good and ready to offer the program in question, one can find it throughout the year. In many cases, all at once!

So as June turns into July, people will keep their gadgets that can produce visual content handy and watch whatever and wherever they may be. The notion of being forced to watch lame variety shows and perhaps tuning in to an anthology series featuring single episodes of sitcoms that will never see the light of day (called in the business as “garbage can theater”) has longed passed. But summertime as it is will still remain the period of the year to take advantage of the so-called great outdoors, even if that outdoors involves long associated indoor antics.
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

Continuing its run at the VS Theatre in Los Angeles is the world premier of Giovanni Adams’ LOVE IS A DIRTY WORD, a solo performance with music that speaks upon a personal journey of a young African-American being living in a world where he seeks his own identity upon others as well as for himself.

In his presentation, Giovanni recites his saga of being raised by his mother in Jackson, Mississippi in a Christian homestead. His father was not around much as his household became broken due to having his father serving time, later leading toward divorce. He continues his life by his discovery of what he desires for himself, going through the many phases on who is is and what he desires to become; A full standing Christian black man who is full of sprit, that later holds the notion of becoming “out”–a far removed state of the drawing of a man of his form.

This solo show, developed by Becca Wolff (who also directs) and written by Giovanni Adams (who also performs), is told in a prose fashion. This method of storytelling is very reminiscent to reciting “slam” poetry. That is, narrated in a style where each line and phrase holds its unique patten of verbiage that adds enough descriptive color where what is said delivers more meaning to each episode that Giovanni dictates. It’s very much to the flavor to a radio drama. Close one’s eyes to hear the words, and the invisible pictures are there to view.

What makes this show as unique is the fact it features original songs composed by Giovanni that he sings in selected moments. The program is not really a “musical” per se. Arturo Lopez performs the musical selections and arrangements as well as the background score on guitar in a troubadour approach. Although the guitarist is present on stage, he only serves as the background as Giovanni unfolds his saga that capsulizes his twenty-five or so year long epic in roughly eighty minutes.

Rachel Myers creates a stage setting where Giovanni presents his parables that shows his life placement, from a simple yet humble homestead complete with furnishings showing off a bedroom, living room with a well worn chair as its only reminder, a bathroom whose only focus is a classic-style bathtub, and a tight virtual outdoor space sporting a floor laden with dry Mississippi mud. Each space represents a phase in his life as he progresses as who and what he became; a performer that holds extensive talent reliving his individualized excursion through his life and times, even if that love is far from being an expression that’s forbidden.

Giovanni Adams has progressed since his days living in a place and age where people of his character has continued to experience traumas not necessarily of their own creation. With shows as this one, his personal passage in life serves as a stepping stone where he can decent upon his roots to head back home and beyond.

LOVE IS A DIRTY WORD, presented by Tilted Field in association with the Vs. Theatre Company, performs at Vs.Theatre, 5453 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles, until July 15th. Showtimes are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM. For tickets and for more information, call (323) 739-4411 or via online at
http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2951780

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The Morgan-Wixson Theatre of Santa Monica closes out their 2016-17 season with the family favorite SEUSSICAL THE MUSICAL, a stage journey that weaves a fable based upon the beloved characters and whimsical settings of the creator of such tales, Dr. Seuss.

Chris Tiernan portrays The Cat In The Hat, who serves as our host introducing his audience and companion JoJo (Nicholas Vizzi) to a number of beings living within the Jungle of Nool, home of Horton the Elephant (Steven Flowers). Horton discovers a speck of dust on a stock of clover that is the home of the Whos living in Whoville lead by the Mayor (Danoel Koh) and Mrs. Mayer (Fiona Porter). He vows to protect these Whos since after all, a person’s a person, no matter how small! Then there is the lazy Mayzie (Amy Coles) a bird that only has one tail feather but desires more! As she receives her wish, Horton, the kind hearted elephant, meets up with another bird Gertrude (Annie Claire Hudson) that asks Horton to sit on her egg while she goes off for the afternoon. Horton agrees to sit on the egg while Gertrude spends her time in Palm Beach! Then Jojo is twisked off to a military school for thinking too many thinks, lead by the General (Daniel Koh), who is at war for those that like their bread butter side down!. This leads to the characters of the Circus McGurkus with all of the filly thrills, with the Sour Kangeroo (Zoe D’Andrea, alternating with Alicia Luoma) and the Wickersham Brothers (Daniel Gaitan, Lauren Blare, and Niko Montelibano.) All of these events (and many more) note upon the places you will go, because you are there!

This witty and charming musical, with book and music by Stephen Flaherty and Lynn Ahrens and co-conceived by Eric Idle, uses a selection of characters and settings created by artist and author Ted S. Geisel a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, and devises a musical that is just as amusing, if not slightly mystifying, than the tales created by the good doctor that kids (both current and former) have enjoyed for multiple generations! In this Morgan-Wixson production, it features a huge ensemble of creative players that sing and move their way through the worlds that may be nonsensical, but are just as real as anyone would want to believe! There isn’t a lot of spoken dialogue in this show, just one tuneful number to the next as the cast belts out through its transcribed score selections as set through Daniel Koh’s musical direction. And with such a show, there is plenty to view! Kristine Rutledge’s costuming is just as colorful and flamboyant as a Sesssian story page! Tristan Griffin’s sets also speak of the sprit of Seuss where the backdrops are just as round and wild! With the aid of Lauren Blair’s choreography, one has a team that showcases to how this musical brings the kid-at-heart for all to marvel!

As to the remainder of the cast, it features a troupe of players that outnumber the space this writer can allow. As much as yours truly would desire to list them all, this humber author of tales not as colorful as Ted Geisel created in his time will give a rowdy “yay” to them all!

SEUSSICAL THE MUSICAL is one of those stage musical of late that never obtained the respect is should have received. This reason for this was because many other playhouses that presented this showpiece were never able to replicate the same sprit and feeling that these Seuss stories did for those that grew up with this fables. The reason behind that theroy dosen’t really matter as to why one would not liking green eggs and ham! This writer will quote that the Morgan-Wison’s presentation of SEUSSICAL is a real treat to see! This is the reason why this theatre company has been around for some seventy plus years! (It’s current location has been home to this company for a little over fifty years!) With all of those years behind its theatre belt, that shows that community theatre is indeed well and alive even in this overly wired age. PS..this is one of the few community theatres with its own phone app, available for free downloading through the regual app outlets!

SEUSSICAL THE MUSICAL, presented by the Morgan-Wixson Theatre Guild, and performs at the Morgan-Wixson Theatre, 2627 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica, until July 29th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM. A special talk back session where the cast and crew discuss their performing as well as taking questions from the audience, occurs after the performances held on Sunday, July 9th, and Friday, July 29th.

For more information as well as ticket reservations, call (310) 828-7519 or via online at http://www.Morgan-Wixson.org.
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Next’s week issue (Vol. 22-No. 27) will feature our annual “State of the Union” address. Don’t miss out!
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

VACATION OF WHAT?

There was an article that appeared in a recent issue in First for Woman, (one of the few magazines in print targeting the female demographic that is not published by either Hearst or Meredith) that was titled What Your Dream Vacation Says About You? , informing the reader that taking a vacation to a specific place presents a personality trait to the vacation-ee.

This form of study uses stats as presented by Stanley Plog Ph. D., and Bahir Browsh who are behind the website BestTripChoices.com that analyzed data taken from some 250,000 travelers over a forty year time span. This collected data states its accuracy to be near 100%, and presents a personalty based on where the vacationer chooses to go and do and how the vacation is executed.

For instance, if one travels to a historical place or landmark, say Gettysburg or Mt. Rushmore, one would be a leader type. Someone who’s engaging and intelligent; a person that enjoys historical destinations that challenges one’s complex mind. If somebody prefers going to a tropical destination (Hawaii, etc.) one is a “go-getter”, a person that craves a deep sense of relaxation to balance an ever busy lifestyle. If somebody prefers to go to a place that calls for adventure (rafting down a river, or camping in the woods), that person is curious, somebody that wants to experience something new and exciting. If going to the big city is an ideal vacation spot, one can be somebody who’s dependable. A person that is organized, honest, calm, and somebody who feel at their best when things are all consistent to one another. And if somebody wants to stay where one lives i.e. experience a “stay-cation, one can be labeled as somebody who’s friendly, and lives a carefree style of being. That person enjoy the company of those close to the stay-at-home vacationer.

Of course, much of the above noted descriptions of these personalities was taken verbatim by way of the notes as reported by Stanley Plog Ph. D., and Bahir Browsh who were behind this study of vacation habits based upon where one heads off to for their personal “R & R”.

It’s around this time of the year where folks who plan to take a few days off for their vacation decide upon where their desire is to go. Some folks plan to head off to a place they have never experienced beforehand, while others head off to the same spot that they have been placing themselves for the number of seasons gone by. This “same time same station” routine is either performed through choice, or just through circumstance. The adventurous seek new places to see and the things to do that go along with those new discoveries. They make those vacations a thrill.

As to those that don’t even bother to go anywhere? Those so-called carefree people can be free sprits and all with staying put. But if they remain in their spot, it could be for the reasons set not necessarily by one’s picking. It could be because they just can’t get away, or they can’t afford to spend the time and money to get some “R ‘n R”, as that notion can be more stressful than what it’s worth!

So the study on people’s personalities based on where they go and what they do is very amusing. Where one heads off to or how they take their time off is good for them! One can even send off a postcard to friends stating “having a wonderful time wish you were here” if as fine. But then again, who sends off postcards? That statement is more suited as a tweet or a bland post on one’s wall on Facebook! But it’s vacation time, so who’s really counting?
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

CARS 3 (Disney/Pixar) finds Lighting McQueen (voiced by Owen Wilson) back in the racing circles. He’s been at it for some time, but not being as the eager, young, and fast racer as he once was. While participating at a race, he encounters a new competitor, Jackson Storm.(Armie Hammer). Jackson may be the new rookie, but he’s part of the new generation of racers, eventuality becoming the latest star of the Piston Cup circuit. In order for Lighting to compete with Jackson, he must train in order to become part of this new generation. His sponsor Rust-Eze was sold off to a new group run by Sterling (Nathan Fillion), a car that’s all business! He assigns Lighting to a new trainer, Cruz Ramirez (Cristela Alonzo) that teaches Lighting the new tricks of the trade. Lighting still holds on to the images of his mentor, the “late” Hudson Hornet (voiced by Paul Newman) to guide him through. Although Lighting may not be as fast as Jackson, he can become smarter as his nemesis. It’s up to Cruz, as well as Lighting himself, to find out how!

This latest entry to the “Cars” franchise is a much different feature than to the previous entry “Cars 2” that was released some six years ago. In that feature, there was more emphasis to the character that serves as comic relief, the tow truck Mater (voiced by Daniel Lawrence Whitney aka Larry The Cable Guy). Although Mater does appear along with most of the cars that made this franchise to what it is for the folks as Disney and Pixar, his character is reduced to a minor role. In Cars 3, the focus is between Lighting and Cruz as the former aims to be what he always was, while the latter attempts to teach an older car some new tricks as the “old car” learns a few tricks of his own!

The screen story by Brian Fee, Ben Queen, Eval Podell, and Jonathon E. Stewart, with screenplay by Kiel Murray, Bob Peterson and Mick Rich has more heart and soul than the previous entries. There isn’t as much wacky humor as one would expect for an animated feature of late, where the comedy focus can be leaning toward the snarky side! (This method of comedy found in animation features is geared toward the adults rather than the kids!) In fact, this lack of cocky humor makes this feature quite enjoyable where one doesn’t expect have fast paced punch lines uttered by its cast. Brian Fee directs this film that is amusing (not necessarily “funny” in the traditional sense), and is the best of the animated features released this year–so far! After a while, one actually forgets that this movie is really a “cartoon”. Much of the racing scenes is conducted in a very realistic manner, showing off to the rest of the CGI animation world that Pixar has the tools of the trade. If they didn’t invent those tools, they rewrote it!

Although it’s too soon to tell, there might be a Cars 4 that Pixar will create sometime soon! Among all of the titles this animation studio has released within the past twenty plus years, the Cars series is the most profitable in terms of merchandising. And since Disney lives on merchandising, expect to see a fourth entry sometime soon! As long as the cash registers ring, so will Cars!

This feature is rated “G” for nothing offensive! Now playing in multiplexes nationwide!
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
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@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com
#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

WORK CAN STILL BE A DREAM!

In last week’s issue (Vol. 22-No. 23 in case you’re keeping track), this writer was laying down a piece about working in a “dream job”, a form of work or employment that one holds a personal passion to do, and perhaps doing such a gig for a real salary or perhaps for any salary! In order words, doing what you would like to do and getting paid for it, too!

Of course, it’s indeed possible to land such a sport that is for the good of one’s self. However, depending on what one wants to do can be a challenge, since finding such a gig may be more difficult as if could get, if indeed even possible!

For a number of folks, the art of finding such a role in life can be tough. Some will be constantly on the prowl looking for the so-called “magic job” that’s out there somewhere, only to find it immediately. Others may come across it later in their search. And sadly, a few may never find it, only to discover that that job may not even exist at all! That is, unless one creates such a spot for themselves.

This writer has heard about a few stories from those that stated that they held the desire to become involved in such a form of employment by finding somebody who’s in the same field, only to ask them for a job or at least to ask them who to see for such a spot, hopefully for pay! (More on that in just a bit!) And a few of these tales from the job field involved the media, specifically the “entertainment” industry–that type of business that many people tend to have some kind of interest in.

Of course, the entertainment industry involves such mediums as movies, television, and to a lesser extend, the theatre. (There are other forms of businesses that can be categorized as part of “the entertainment industry”, but we’ll stick to the first two choices for this example!)

Those picks tend to involve actors and acting. (When we state about “actors”, we mean those that create some kind of characters are people of both genders!) These are the kind that are first seen in the spotlight, and hold the most fame and even fortunes! Then there are those that work behind the scenes, such as directors, writers, and the like. Then there are those jobs that are called “below the line”, such as set decorators, make up artists, film/videotape/moving image editors, etc. Those gigs may not hold the glamor and notability as those that act for a living, but are important nevertheless. Those that are established within those fields tend to be known within their own circles. Granted, there are some directors that hold the same status as an actor, but for a prop master? Not so much! (You won’t read about prop people in People magazine, or even hear about them on some piece appearing on E! Entertainment.)

As to those “true stories” this writer heard about involved those that wanted to become a writer in TV and/or movies. Not just any kind of writing mind you, but to write comedy pieces, either one-line jokes and full blown comical epics.

Those tales had the wannabe writer attempt to get their craft out to those that are connected, such as stand up comics, or those that write for well known or even lesser known TV sitcoms. There mission was to create samples of their writing skills on some form of fixed media (paper), and to give those sheets to those power-that-be to add a “Look what I can do!” response.

Once source that this writer personally knows told me in some form that he wanted to write comedy. His self-given assignment was to stop over to the offices of a writer (or in this case, the writing team) to say hello and to give to them a sample of his writing abilities. So he went over to the studio lot where the writers held an office space. He told the secretary on duty at the office that he wanted to see this pair of writers. She told him that they were in some kind of meeting, but he could sit in the office to wait until they were done. So he took a chair to sit down upon and wanted. And waited. And waited. Finally, one of the writers exited the office where the meeting was held. The wannabe got up to say something to the affect of “Oh Mister Big time Writer! I’m a wannabe writer, and would like to meet with you!” This big time writer looked at this lad and noticed that he held a lot of enthusiasm as well as patience to wait all of this time. To make a long story short, our hero did get a gig as an assistant to this writing team. Their friendship lasted for many years since and continued when one of the big time writers passed on. And this form of connected started out by attempting to make our wannabe writer known with the sincerity he possessed.

One can guess that this little episode occurred a few generations ago when walking in coldly to a writer’s office was a lot easier that it would be in today’s world. Nowadays, if one wanted to get to one’s office, the management would call security and before one would know it, our wannabe writer would be tossed out of the place, if not charged on a trespassing rap. Even if one could even get close to the writer, the wannabe writer has to be of a certain age; Let’s say under the age of 35, or even 30! (The younger the better!)

This method of getting a dream job won’t get one far in the current landscape as there are other methods to reach out to those out there. Social media has served as a springboard to those that have the desire to not only get what they want, but to even become famous in their own right. Even if one has no desire to become an actor, writer, or something out of “show biz”, if it quite possible to get a job in something they want to do. Granted, it may not be easy per se, but it’s more possible than one may think! It’s part of the thrill of the chase to do something that is part of being somebody or something. Even if the pay is small for what it is, one dose has the chance to move somewhere!

This writer will continue upon this tale on dream jobs in future issues. Until then, just stay tuned to this news service for updates!
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