THE CHRISTMAS TV SPECIAL

    Now that the so-called holiday season is upon us, it’s time to express some of the elements and rituals that make this time of year just what it is; A period of shopping, cooking/backing, eating, and overall attempting to make merry in this domestic society where things are once again going amuck!
One of the many points of this time of year focuses upon media. Yes, one radio station here in Los Angeles has been playing the “sounds of the season” since November 11th–nearly two whole weeks before Thanksgiving that programs the overly familiar yet somewhat tired hits that are part of Christmas. (This writer is using the term “Christmas” since the subject on hand will speak about elements that used this form of description.) Television and the season has its focus as well since the visuals tend to win out verses the audio aspects.
Ever since television service began on a large scale around 1948, television and Christmas has become one and all. In one form or another, nearly every program of significance has used the season as part of its programming that ranges from comedy, drama, and in between. Musical variety programs were noted to offer a Christmas episode as part of its run. The kind of programming was usually in the form of the host(s) of the program belting out a few Christmas themed songs, the “special guest stars” would join in with the hosts singing along or whatever, as well as participating in a number of comedy skits where the humor had something to do with Christmas. It was done in fun, and viewers always made sure that they would be tuning in.
Beginning in the 1962-63 season, NBC would offer another form of Christmas programming. Not as part of a regular series, but in the form of an animated production. That was the year that the network aired Magoo’s Christmas Carol, a cartoon created by United Productions of America (UPA) an animation house based in Burbank, California that starred Mr. Magoo as voiced by Jim Backus. This animated feature retold the evergreen story by Charles Dickens with Magoo portraying Scrooge. Not only was the program a hit, but the network, airing the cartoon in color, reran it for a number of years afterward. This cartoon was the first of the modern animated Christmas specials that would later become part of the TV landscape.
Two years later, the same TV network (NBC) presented yet another animated special  Rudolf The Red Nose Reindeer that told the tale of the name character based on the song composed by Johnny Marks and made its debut in 1949 as a song recorded by Gene Autry. Unlike Magoo where it was a traditional cartoon, Rudolf was presented in stop motion animation, presented by the team of Arthur Rakin, Jr. and Jules Bass.
The next season, (1965-66) CBS presented A Charlie Brown Christmas, using the characters from the comic strip Peanuts that told the charming story of Charlie Brown directing a Christmas pageant at their school, with Linus telling the biblical interpretation of the first Christmas. That cartoon presented by Lee Mendelsen and Bill Melendez, who operated an animation house that made cartoons for TV commercials, was yet another big hit, picking up a slew of awards and citations.
Finally, for the 1966-67 season, CBS premiered another animated special Dr. Seuss’ How The Grinch Stole Christmas, an animated version of the book written and illustrated by Ted Geisel, better known by his pen name Dr. Seuss. The animated special directed by Charles “Chuck” Jones for MGM Television, became another hit.
Since that time, many other animated Christmas specials were presented by all of the three TV networks, as well as a few syndicated through other TV stations across the land. Many of them came from the team of Rakin-Bass, while others were produced by various companies using various characters; some were new, while others used existing characters from other sources. Although a few were rather memorable that were worthy of its multiple showings, many of the others ranged from mildly amusing to downright forgettable! This saturation diluted the overall charm and appeal to these shows created for the season. That is why the titles that were of the forgettable category were never repeated again! (If one desires to find a listing of the forgotten-for-good shows, use that search engine of yours and type in “Forgettable Animated Christmas TV Specials” and see ‘em for yourself!)
It’s interesting to note that unlike the majority of animated TV specials that were mostly aimed toward kids, the first four titles mentioned in this article were geared for all ages, meaning that although kids enjoyed them for what they were, adults would be as amused in tuning in. This reflection to its all-age grouping came about to the companies that originally sponsored the specials in question. For Magoo, its original sponsor was Timex watches. Rudolf’s advertiser was General Electric appliances. The first Peanuts special was hosed by Coca-Cola, and Grinch was sponsored by Full Service Banks, an umbrella group of savings & loan financial institutions. These four company were not really “kid friendly”. The commercials aired were targeting the adults that were watching with their kids, or perhaps tuning in alone. For comparing, many of the original specials that aired on the networks from the 1970’s well into the 1990’s had advertisers that were either selling toys, cereals, snack foods, or some other product that kids would most likely consume. Even in reruns, the above first four titles were taken over by these same companies that reduced these shows as “kiddie fodder”, even though those far from childhood age may still find them appealing.
In today’s video landscape, the animated seasonal special is still alive and living, although it’s around under different circumstances. Home video has kept some titles alive (minus commercials, of course), and thanks to the ‘net, one can still view these shows through various video streaming platforms. Some have commercials while others are ad free. And best of all, one isn’t limited to being in front of a TV machine as one can watch these shows using any internet connected device that sports a video screen.
So enjoy the holiday season with a glass of egg nog, a tom & jerry (the drink, not the cartoon), or a spiced hot toddy and watch all of the Christmas TV specials one can take.  Although they don’t make them as they used to (good or bad), at least they are available to savor once more!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS
No reviews this week, but check back with us in the next issue for more of the review you look out for! See you then!
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and                                                       not necessarily  of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

BLACK WHAT AND CYBER WHO??

For the past number of years, people kicked offed their holiday season by going through the post modern traditional methods of shopping for the period, either grabbing gifts for somebody else, or goods for themselves. Stores and related retail outlets, ready to take advantage of those buyers that tend to perform their heaviest shopping between Thanksgiving and Christmas (December 25th), host door busing sale periods that’s been called “Black Friday”. Taking the accounting term “black” meaning a profit margin earned, these sales occurred the day after Thanksgiving (the “Friday” part) where retailers would open at some early morning hour (6:00 AM or so), to offer rock bottom prices on selected goods that are only offered while supplies last. And usually, those on demand items are only offered in a very limited amount.
The goods in question tended to revolve around electronics such as flat screen TVs, computer devices, and the like, or some other form of good that usually costs more than one would want to pay. Practical goods or traditional gift items were rarely offered if at all, since there would be little demand or incentive to have people fight just because clothing (unless its designer label lines) sold at a lower rate would make folks come in at such a godly hour. And interestingly enough, those for noted electronic machines are usually purchased not as a gift per se, but as a good for the purchaser to be used as an common everyday item.
Cyber Monday, the extended version of “Black Friday”, speaks for the day where folks usually returning back to their office based jobs, would go online after the long weekend to scout the online retailers and related sources to find the same kind of bargains those so-called “brick and mortar” places offered. Unlike fighting crowds at a retail store at 6:00 AM, folks would be able to shop online without the usual skullduggery that goes on at real stores with real people!
Over the last few years, retails, both for real and in virtual cyberspace, offered their Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals a lot earlier in the year. Some places started their shopping season around Columbus Day, hoping that folks flushed with spending cash would take advantage of the deals being offered far from the start of the traditional year.
The reason for this is explained in many methods. Perhaps the most obvious one is the fact that if an outlet offers something “hot” a few days or weeks before, then one will attempt to beat the crowds to buy it right then and then. Before long, other retails also catered to those early birds offering with the same deals they would have placed on the table that day after Thanksgiving and/or the Monday after the Thanksgiving weekend.
Now you have a period where Black Friday and Cyber Monday isn’t as important as it used to be. With shoppers more aware than ever thanks to hand held electronic gadgets that sport video screens, one can get the scoop on all of the bargains long before one sets foot into a store and/or shop online. And unless the selection of deals is vast and assorted, one won’t necessarily look for a deal in a big screen TV set since the set purchased as a past Black Friday offering is still holding court in one’s home. Unless that set is to be replaced, then one is oft to buy. Then again, the deals offer and the reasons behind the purchases made will vary. So there goes your proof!
Whatever the case and whatever the method, the shopping season is going at full tilt. Because Christmas falls on a Sunday this year, and Hanukkah week runs from December 24th (Christmas Eve) through January 1st (New Year’s Day), this planning gives retails a way to set face accordingly. And since the final week of the year is the slowest, it’s a great way to offer more deals and bargains that week so the retailers may place those purchases on their 2016 accounting books. That will keep them in the black while sporting the red, green, blue, and white!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS
Appearing at the Zephyr Theatre located in the Fairfax district of Los Angeles is the world premier of John R. Lacey’s GARDEL’S TANGO, a play with songs about a person who devised the modern version of a method dance that’s been noted to be the most romantic and perhaps the most erotic: The tango!
The story focuses upon Carlos Gardel, as portrayed by Anibel Silveyra. Gardel was a musical vocalist that would create melodic pieces that were fit for a style of dance from Argentina that was beginning to make its presence around the early years of the 20th century. Although Gardel was born in France and migrating to Buenos Aires at a young age, he fit in right away to the country’s culture. As an adult, he would set himself in the places where the tango was performed. Within this form of settings, he had many women at his disposal. One woman Isabel del Valle (Mantha Balourdou) became a romantic parter of his. But outside of his womanizing, there were others that assisted him to enhance the popularity of the tango. One person was an early musical parter known as The Maestro (Richard Lewis Warren), who became a mentor of his. Using his unique style, Gardel introduced this form of dance that later took the world by storm that continued long after Gardel’s career had concluded.
This play written and and directed by John R. Lacey, tells the story of Carlos Gardel who may not necessarily be a household name per se, but is the one responsible for creating the love affair of the tango, a dance that holds more style and grace than any other form of movement. The storyline is more of a deeper drama than a traditional biographical tale that starts at a root beginning and finishes the story with an obvious conclusion. This saga unfolds with Carlos singing the romantic ballads that augment this form of dance. These form of vocalizing throughout labels this play as a “play with songs” rather that a full fledged musical of sorts. Anibel Silveyra as Gardel sings his ballads in a rich vocal tone. Many of his vocal numbers are performed in an acapella style. Although the for noted musical tones are just as important toward this method of singing, one has the moment to hear Silveyra sing those expressive ballads that are intense yet never overshadows the storyline where traditional musicals tend to contain.
The cast of performers that appear in this program also include Saratoga Ballantine, Hildy Brooks, Agustin Coppola, and Hollie Sokol. Daniel Keough provides the set design, and Alicia Savio provides the tango choreography that fits right in as a part of the mood and ambiance toward this form of dance.
The tango is a variety of expressive dance that is seen as something very moody and holds extensive sex appeal. This play not only shows the tango in its peak form, but also expresses the saga of the person that introduces this dance to the world. Very few, if any other, types of ethnic dances contain this element of appeal, and this stage showcase discloses this saga in its keen fashion.

     GARDEL’S TANGO, presented by IP Entertainment Productions, and performs at the  Zephyr Theatre, 7456 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles, until December 18th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday evenings at 6:00 PM. For ticket reservations, call (626) 381-9767, or via online at http://www.artful.ly/store/events/10033
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RULE DON’T APPLY (Fox) takes place in the latter years of the 1950’s-1958 to be exact. There has been a big casting call for a new feature film where young upcoming startles are being sought by RKO Pictures for the lead playing role. One of the many starlets that are called is Marla Marbly (Lily Collins) an actress, songwriter, and beauty queen from a small Virginia town. She comes from a strict Baptist background as well, making herself as “pure”. She arrives in Hollywood being picked up by driver Frank Forbes (Alden Ehrenreich). Frank is a very ambitious yet humble soul that also comes from a strict religious background also hailing from a small town (Fresno). His employer is the head of RKO studios–millionaire Howard Hughes (Warren Beatty). Both Marla and Frank know of the mystery behind the man. Frank has never met him as he is always in a sense of hiding. Even Hughes’s staff can’t seem to get him out of his shell to discuss company business, from Hughes Company senior head leader Levar Mathis (Matthew Broderick), Hughes CEO Noah Dietrich (Martin Sheen) and Hughes’ secretary Nadine (Candice Bergen). As Marla is settled in a lush rented Hollywood Hills home paid for by Hughes, she and Frank takes upon a relationship. However, there is a rule within Hughes’ company that forbids that “no employee is allowed to have any relationship whatsoever with a contract actress”. Although Marla is single, Frank is “married” to his middle school aged sweetheart Sarah Bransford (Taissa Farmiga) still living in Fresno. However, Marla does have the chance to meet with Hughes himself where the two strike their own relationship that adds to the mystery behind the man, and the operations he appears to preside over.
This feature, written, directed, and starring Warren Beatty takes a look at the life of Howard Hughes through a rather fictional “Hollywood-esque” point of view. The screen play by Beatty with story by Beatty and Bo Goodman, focus upon a number of factors: The slow building relationship between Marla and Frank, the eclectic relationship between Marla and Hughes, and the conflicts between Hughes and his staff where his team is fighting off a threatened lawsuit between TWA and his Hughes aircraft company of mismanagement issues. What makes this movie appealing is the period and setting that the actions occurs; Specifically, the late 1950’s where Hollywood itself was spending its final years from being the closed studio system and RKO itself was on its last legs. (RKO as a film studio ceased operations in 1958, later selling itself off to General Tire!) But getting back to the film itself. It does boast a teeming number of character performers that add to the flavor and context this feature has to offer, The other know players include Dabney Coleman as Raymond Holiday, Steve Coogan as pilot Colonel Nigel Briggs, Megan Hilty as actress Sally, Oliver Platt as businessman Forester to name a few. As with period films, there is a lot of eye candy to see in terms of design from and of the era. Jeannine Oppewall provides the production design with Nancy Haigh’s set decoration that shows off a lot of 50’s modern era dressings that are from an time where function followed fashion. The same goes for Albert Wolsky’s costuming that ranges from formal stylish to semi “cool”. Caleb Deschanel’s cinematography is just as stunning to look at; reminding those movie watchers that this picture is a drama laded period piece, rather than another action adventure CGI overloaded shoot-em-up!
Not everything seen and heard within this film is perfect. It dose suffer a bit from “invisible juke box syndrome”, where music from the period (rock and roll mostly, but a few standards are placed for balance) is heard on the soundtrack coming form nowhere. This form of musical backdrop serves to add to the mood and flavor for the period it speaks for. It’s not annoying, but it’s a movie making method that was beaten to the ground in the 1990’s! However, it dose offer an original song: “Rules Don’t Apply”, composed by Eddie Akin (music) and lyrics by Lorraine Feather, a mellow ballad that has the sound of a musical piece from the era that’s placed within the context of the story, rather than a tune slapped at the end credits as an afterthought. This same musical number will most likely be nominated as “Best Original Song” at the upcoming Academy Awards fest, since many of its voters came to age in the same era this movie speaks about!
RULES DON”T APPLY is a film for the more “seasoned” (i.e. older) crowd that still will go to movies in theatres as they did back in the day. This element isn’t bad for what it is. In fact it’s fine! However, it’s a title that is nothing to compare akin to those summer hits where everything is either animated or is part of some kind of “tent pole” picture in order to create a money making franchise. But that’s the Hollywood now, just like what was the Hollywood then!
This movie is rated PG-13 for sexual material including brief strong language, thematic elements, and drug references. Opens on November 23rd at a number of theatres nationwide.
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Angel City Chorale presents BRING ON THE JOY, a concert set for the holiday season that offers a selection of musical numbers led by a 160 plus member choir backed by a twenty five piece orchestra.
Sue Fink, Artistic Director for the ACC, will head the ensemble on a musical journey of traditional and contemporary songs and musical pieces that cover many cultures and observances from classic spiritual to the modern era. There will be melodic selections that are well known, and a variety that are ready for new found discovery. From scores with African, Celtic, and Medieval roots, to those extracted from Gospel, R&B, and even popular standards sources with a few post modern selections tossed in will be presented that celebrate the seasonal time that speaks for joy, hope, peace, and all points in between.
The concert will take place for two shows only, Saturday, December 3rd and Sunday, December 4th at 7:00 PM at Wilshire United Methodist Church, 4350 Wilshire Blvd. in the Hancock Park district of Los Angeles. This church has been the pillar of this community for some ninety years and serves as the performing home of the ACC. With its grandiose spacing and near pitch perfect acoustics, this location is ideal to host such a concert that follow with the grandest traditions of style, grace, and overall total enjoyment for all ages.
For more information on the Angel City Chorale’s presentation of BRING ON THE JOY, as well as to order tickets (save five dollars per ticket when obtained in advance), call (310) 943-9231, or via the ACC’s website at http://www.AngelCityChorale.org
  Note: This notice also appeared in the previous issue.
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2016 Linear Cycle Productions.
All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not                                                        necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

HOLIDAY ANTICS AHEAD

This week unofficially kicks off the ever so frantic “last six weeks of the year” where it seems that everyone (or at least almost everyone), tends to place themselves into a mad scramble to become involved in some sort of fashion to participate in all of the rituals and events that occur from late November to the first of the new year. This phase is generally known as “The Holidays” that consist of the holidays known as Thanksgiving, Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, New Year’s Eve/Day, and any other events of general significance.
To bring up a disclaimer, this article will speak for events taking place within the USA, as Canada had their Thanksgiving on October 10th–the same day as the USA’s Columbus Day, and that nation as well as the other British commonwealths celebrate Boxing Day on December 26th.
Of course, those holidays, in comparison to the other days of note occurring the rest of the year, have much meaning to them to the domestic public at large. And to the retailers out there, these are the times where money is to be made in terms of goods sold and exchanged, as well as the services that tend to go along with the goods in question. Generally speaking, this vastly important six weeks of the year means that the profit margins tend to be much higher than what can be gained throughout the other ten and a half months the calendar year holds.
In this modern day and age, shopping for Christmas and the other holidays where gifts are normally exchanged, has become a battle.The entire object to the shopping season is to be prepared. For weeks before, going back as far as the end of the previous season, people made sure that they are ready, willing and able to perform their tasks of shopping for goods and services that become part of the gift giving. And thanks to modern technology, their have all of the tools on hand to complete their objectives in full order.
A recent article that appeared in Adweek noted upon what a shopper will use in order to not only get the best deals around, but where and how to find them all. According to the report, this post modern shopper will have on average, three to four electronic devices to research products, compare prices and make purchases. The shopper may view a moving image ad for the product as well to find a link to make the purchase where it will be picked up from a regional retail outlet, or to have the item shipped to the party receiving the gift complete in fancy gift wrapping and a greeting card enclosed to boot. And all of this shopping can be done with a few swipes or taps on a screen on one hand, along with a valid credit card held in the other.
Shopping, one of the most common rituals one partakes in during this season, may be important, but isn’t necessarily limited to. There are the massive number of parties that will take place through private means or through public/general audience measures. Many large(r) companies will once again host get togethers for their working staff. For many firms, this calendar year has seen bigger profits, and thus, reflect this graduated to their employed folks that made it happen by offering celebrations that contain the usually party-type antics.
And there are the other vices that are linked to festive parties and the attendance of them, mostly in the realms of eating and possible drinking more that what’s standard. Thanksgiving of course, centers around wolfing down a meal of turkey and all of the trimmings. Christmas, etc. also consists of too many goodies. A few are “healthy”, but most are not! Sugar and oil, one of the so-called deadly sins of cuisine, will take front row to all of the offings made. The same goes toward alcohol. A few glasses of wine on Thanksgiving day, numerous sprits from hot toddies to tom and jerrys in December, and a glass or two (or possibly three or more) of champaign consumed to ring out the old and to ring in the new, will be downed in full force.
In spite of the other events that will take shape, such as the January crowning of the new king king/queen of the USA as well as the Super Bowl playoff games, the holiday season is already here, like it or not! But after all of the dust settles and all of the wrapping paper is swepted away, at least one can’t say there is nothing going on! It’s just one of those times of the year that folks love to hate and hate to love!
Don’t say we didn’t warn you!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS
Theatre 40 of Beverly Hills presents the west coast premier of THE CONSUL, THE TRAMP, AND AMERICA’S SWEETHEART, a comedy by John Morogiello about a former silent star turned movie mogul, another silent star turning toward “talkies”, and a foreign council whose position is to make sure that Hollywood is treating its ruling political party is a respected light.
The time is 1939, the period when Hollywood was at its peak. At the offices of United Artists run by Mary Pickford (Melanie Chartoff), an unexpected visitor arrives by the name of George Gyssling (Shawn Savage). He isn’t an actor nor does he have a screenplay to sell. He serves as the official council of the Third Reich, a German political party that is building in strength in Europe. Rumor has it (or at least according to Hedda Hopper’s newspaper column), that UA is to film a picture called The Great Dictator starring Charlie Chaplin (Brian Stanton). This feature will be the first where Chaplin actually speaks, and won’t be playing the “little tramp”. Pickford’s secretary Esther Hollombe (Laura Lee Walsh) tries to stop Gyssling in barging in. But he is there not only to halt Pickford in shooting this film, but threatens to ban any UA releases in Germany, Austria, and other territories that the Nazi party plans to take over. So a meeting is held between the three that will decide the fate of this movie, and perhaps UA itself. Will this film become Chaplin’s greatest pic of all time? Will Gyssling get his way to stop a picture that will make fun of Der Führer? Will Pickford risk to lose part of their European market? And how will Esther become part of this mess?
This one act play is a very comical look at the best of “old Hollywood” when studios were run by actual people that once made and/or stared in films, rather than bigwigs that came from business or law school. The cast of four that appear in this play fit the bill when it comes to movie stars and the like of the era, as well as the innocent bystander that can really change things, along with the “bad guy” that really might make that difference! Out of the four, Brian Stanton as Charlie Chaplin is perhaps the best one of them all, playing his character in a very animated fashion. His portrayal of this one time silent star of two reel comedies is nearly perfect, if not entirely perfect! Jules Aaron directs this program in a very tight method where the comedy and action never buckles down for one moment!
Along with the action as seen on stage is the set where all of the comedy and movement takes place. Theatre 40 resident set decorator Jeff Rack creates a setting depicting Mary Picford’s office space that is more akin to an executive suite, complete with classic antiques and other pieces that were in vogue when Chaplin and Pickford were acting without using words, or at least speaking them!
Overall, this production at Theatre 40 is just as comical as one can get. The Hollywood from this bygone era has a lot to take note about. It’s a period that won’t be ever coming back either, so it’s nice to see a depiction of the period when Tinseltown, USA really shined through! But then again, that’s just show biz!

THE CONSUL, THE TRAMP, AND AMERICA’S SWEETHEART, presented by Theatre 40 and performs at the Reuban Cordova Theatre, located within the campus of Beverly Hills High School, 241 South Moreno Drive (off little Santa Monica Blvd.) Beverly Hills, until December 18th. Showtimes are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM. No performances on November 24th and 25th. For ticket reservations or for more information, call (310) 364-0535, or via online at http://www.Theatre40.com
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Angel City Chorale presents BRING ON THE JOY, a concert set for the holiday season that offers a selection of musical numbers led by a 160 plus member choir backed by a twenty five piece orchestra.
Sue Fink, Artistic Director for the ACC, will head the ensemble on a musical journey of traditional and contemporary songs and musical pieces that cover many cultures and observances from classic spiritual to the modern era. There will be melodic selections that are well known, and a variety that are ready for new found discovery. From scores with African, Celtic, and Medieval roots, to those extracted from Gospel, R&B, and even popular standards sources with a few post modern selections tossed in will be presented that celebrate the seasonal time that speaks for joy, hope, peace, and all points in between.
The concert will take place for two shows only, Saturday, December 3rd and Sunday, December 4th at 7:00 PM at Wilshire United Methodist Church, 4350 Wilshire Blvd. in the Hancock Park district of Los Angeles. This church has been the pillar of this community for some ninety years and serves as the performing home of the ACC. With its grandiose spacing and near pitch perfect acoustics, this location is ideal to host such a concert that follow with the grandest traditions of style, grace, and overall total enjoyment for all ages.
For more information on the Angel City Chorale’s presentation of BRING ON THE JOY, as well as to order tickets (save five dollars per ticket when obtained in advance), call (310) 943-9231, or via the ACC’s website at http://www.AngelCityChorale.org
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On behalf of the staff and management of Accessibly Live Off-Line, we wish each and everyone one of our readers and subscribers a very Happy Thanksgiving.
We’ll see you for our next issue coming next week!
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

AccessiblyLiveOffLine@twc.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com

@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com
#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2016 Linear Cycle Productions.
All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not                                                 necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

“RADIO” ON TELEVISION AND A BRIEF WORD

Before we begin on this week’s topic, This writer does want to establish that from results over last week’s election, Donald Trump will become king of the USA beginning next January 20th. This same writer won’t present any additional opinions or commentary of this matter. We are just recording this notice for the record.
Now that we got that element on of the way, let’s proceed to the real topic on hand, shall we…?
Not so long ago, yours truly was involved in a rather impromptu discussion with a few folks I recently encountered. We, along with my spouse Mary, who never really receives the credit I should give her on getting subject ideas for these weekly editorials, were sitting around over food and drink discussing about the current state media at large. (The people I were with were involved in TV production in somewhat of a smaller scale.)
Anywho, we were talking about how those big deal producers and show runners that create moving image programming find their ideas to pitch so their shows can become the next fill-in-the-blank. I made some half backed comment that these folks seeking the next big thing should turn to radio programs that could make it to the video world. Being the sarcastic one that I am, I didn’t state that these producers and/or executive producers would turn to a AM/FM radio dial to find their big hit, but should turn toward podcasts to see what could could become a series that would be placed within the media landscape.
Of course, there were some laughs involved over my comment. Then we got into another subject that had been since long forgotten about.
I used the focal point on the media called “podcasts” since these programs, found on various places in cyberspace, are audio programs that are indeed radio-esque. The shows themselves usually consist of a team of hosts (it’s usually presented by more than one person since it’s rather difficult, if not overly dull and boring, to have one single person talk for longer length of time) that speak upon a specific subject that the hosts have some knowledge to discuss in full. Many times these programs have interviews with others who also share the same amount of knowledge about the subjects in hand. The shows themselves can range for an hour’s time (its usual running length), although some podcasts are shorter in period, while other tend to ramble on for longer than sixty minutes. And to the show’s content quality, that can range for anything professional to downright crude and amateurish. The reason for this wide scale is the fact that nearly anyone can create a podcast. All one needs is a mic that can be plugged into a device that can capture sound, and a place found on the ‘net that can make their shows available to anyone that has the desire to listen. All of the shows can be heard by demand. One doesn’t have to listen in on a certain day or on a certain time. Just find the show, click on “play” (or something like that to get the sound started), and hear the noise on your electronic device that that reproduce sounds and/or can be connected to the ‘net!!
So what does podcasts have to do with new video programs that can be found on your TV or related device? Legacy network ABC and Amazon, a company now involved in the streaming video business, recently announced that they are involved in bringing to the video world two programs: Start Up, a series that is about an actual start up company called Gimlet Media, and Lore, a program self described as a series about “real-life scary stories”. Start Up is in development for ABC, while Lore will be for Amazon. Both programs have been operating for barley two years, and the same two were first created as separate podcasts.
To give a basic disclaimer, this writer has yet to hear the two noted podcasts in question–or any podcast for that matter! What is the reason for this not tuning in? For starters, this person (“me”) doesn’t necessarily have the time to tune into a talk-type show during the day. The only time I have the opportunity to hear audio gabbing is when traveling in a vehicle. As a captive audience, I have the car radio tuned into to whatever program is of interest at the moment. And that gabbing is something that is rather time sensitive, such as traffic and/or weather reports, or perhaps on a subject that I may find interesting. However, since my commuting time is rather short for what it is, I tend to never hear the show in full. By the time I arrive at my destination, the radio is shut off, and that’s the end of the program. The same goes for missing the first half of the program since I don’t usually start on my journey in sync to a specific radio show.
As to podcast themselves. There are literally thousands of these type of programs found all over where the ‘net is accessible. Last September, there was even a podcast convention that took place in Los Angeles were for a weekend, one can “see” many of the better quality podcasts being performed in front of a studio audience. As to the quality of these invisible shows in terms of content and on how they sound, it’s just a wide range. Because podcasts live as a two sided edge, anyone with a little gumption can present a podcast. And some of these podcast hosts don’t appear to have what it takes, meaning that they should place their efforts on doing something else! Generally speaking, you really get what you pay for!
And where does the term “podcast” come from? It’s a term derived from Apple’s first big hit known as the iPod, a device that can reproduce sounds extracted from a computer based digital file that can recreate audio, both music and voice. And since podcasts can not be found on traditional radio bands, they are not radio shows per se, although they do act like them! And for the most part, they are not transmitted live, although there are many “live” podcast shows out there that keep up to date.
So there you have it! Pretty soon, perhaps the moving picture studios can find a feature film based on a podcast. Those days are not too far off. Then again, super hero movies are a better choice since they tend to make money and are very easy to translate. Gunfire and explosions need no subtitles, and they are very popular in China–the next worldwide market to embrace movies! But that’s for another topic! Perhaps there is a podcast out in cyberspace land that will discuss how this Asian nation will take over the movie business!
Stay tuned!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS
Art Shulman’s THE YENTAS WEAR HED HATS, a comedy about the said yentas who shift from playing team basketball to form a “girls club”, and the men that intertwine, performs at North Hollywood’s Secret Rose Theatre.
Tess (Ellen Bienenfeld) and Craig (Art Shulman) has been a couple for some eight weeks. They are of a “seasoned” variety, meaning they are far from being young but remain young at heart. Craig is known in the local circles to coach a ladies basketball team consisting of woman beyond their midpoint in their lives. The team itself called the “Yentas” consists of Anne (Anita Borcia), Becky (Nancy Kramer), Mary Margaret (Sue Molenda), Janice (Carol Anne Sefinger) and Trudi (Suzan Solomon). Although their season of playing basketball can concluded, they decide to form a red hat club. The purpose of this group is to get together and to have fun. They even sport a uniform consisting of a purple dress donning a red hat of various sizes and styles. Craig feels he’s being pushed aside from these ladies, but a rival of sorts appear, Jake (J. Kent Inasy) who seems to be wooing Tess. It’s a clash of a gathering of ladies, as well as if Craig will ask Tess to marry him, although there is some motion that’s stopping Tess to accept. Could it be nerves, another man, or something else?
This comedy written by local writer Art Shulman is a charming look of how those of a select demographic (aged 50+), can shake off any stigma of being up in years to enjoy life, even if that enjoyment has their little issues. The cast of ladies that appear in this play hold a delightful personality that is far from a “little old lady” stereotype that’s been around for quite some time. Much of the action takes place in Craig’s living room setting, meaning that there is a lot of dialogue to go though. It’s far from being talky, yet what’s spoken moves the storyline along. Kaz Matamura directs this program that is charming, lighthearted, and is sweet within its own method.
A special note goes to Liz Nankin for her costuming of the yentas as they become their red hat group, donning purple outfits and red hats that are eccentric, but are not overly wild.
For those not in the know, a “yenta” is a yiddish word to describe a woman who is usually of the Jewish persuasion who is a gossip, busybody, or someone who meddles into a situation that they shouldn’t become involved in. (The term is not to be confused with describing a matchmaker, although there is a relationship subplot connected to this story!) Whatever the case and whatever the label, it’s a very pleasant play that proves that getting up in years is another asset to keep rather than a curse to dread. And these yentas will back up that fact, red hats and all!

THE YENTAS WEAR RED HATS, performs at the Secret Rose Theatre, 11246 Magnolia Blvd, (one and a half blocks west of Lankershim) North Hollywood, until December 18th. SHowtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM. For more information or for reservations, call (818) 285-8699, or via online at http://www.TheYentasWearRedHats.com
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ARRIVAL (Paramount) features Amy Adams as Dr. Louise Banks, a linguist that is teaching at a large yet unnamed university. She once performed translations of languages for the military, so she still holds security clearance. Many years before, she once had a daughter named Hannah who fell ill at a young age and eventually died. But that was those many years before, although she still experiences flashbacks from the time Hannah was still around.
Things begin to change when a series of mysterious ships from another world or galaxy start to appear in various places around the world. Strange sounds are coming from this crafts as if something is attempting to communicate through their speech. Louise receives a visit from army Colonel Weber (Forest Whitaker), requesting that she participates on the army’s mission to not only communication to these aliens, but to perhaps ask why they traveled to earth and what is their intention–peace or war? So becoming part of the special team consisting of Ian Donnelly (Jeremy Renner), Special Agent Halpern (Michael Stuhlbarg), and Captain Marks (Mark O’Brien), they are out to seek answers from a species they know nothing about to discover why these beings are residing on earth from a place unknown.
This feature can be described as a “sci-fi” feature, although it’s not necessarily the typical type one could experience. Yes, there is a ship or vessel the aliens travel that resembles a vary large black flat rock–the same kind that’s found along a riverbank. And the creatures themselves have the appearance of an blacken elongated squid, complete with tentacles that act as arms. In fact, Dr. Banks and company communicate with two of these creatures where they name them “Abbot & Costello” (no kidding!) that not only “speak”, but they have the ability of written communication. (The “words” they write resemble coffee cup impressions that one can find on a coffee joint tabletop!) The storyline is extracted from a short written piece entitled “Story of Your Life” written by Ted Chiang that appeared in an anthology of sci-fi tales. This movie expands this short tale with a screenplay by Eric Heisserer that focuses upon the Dr. Banks character and how she attempts to communicate with the aliens, as well as how she reacts through the loss of her daughter as experienced through flashbacks. These flashback episodes tend to slow down the tension this type of movie can present. Perhaps the flashback episodes belongs in another type of film, not in a flick that has beings from outer space–or somewhere like that! Denis Villeneuve directs this movie that is a cross between emotional commotion, and the kind of drama that give prominence to aliens and military presence.
This is the time of year where Hollywood releases titles that tend to cater to voting members of groups or organizations that fob off awards to movies released in the year previous. (Disclaimer: This writer belongs to one of those groups!) These same group of members tend to be much older that the standard variety that attend movie shows in theaters, and have a preference to features that are full of drama and pathos, rather than loaded with fart jokes, explosions, gunfire, and super heroes running amuck! That doesn’t give this movie a place where one could be bored with (it’s entertaining as it is), but it does hold more emotional episodes one would expect otherwise for a title of this ilk.
This feature is rated “PG-13” for intense sci-fi-esque scenes and mild cussing. Now playing in multiplexes nationwide.
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2016 Linear Cycle Productions.
All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and                                                    not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

THE MIRACLE BEHIND AND THE MIRACLE AHEAD

This is a very strange time indeed!
Two unique events are within the nation’s mists. Granted, not everyone would take notice, let alone even care. But it’s enough for this writer to place his two cents for.
As to the past miracle. Yep, the good Ol‘ Chicago Cub, the National League’s official “lovable losers” won their first world service since 1908, a time where the only electronic source to catch the game back in ’08 was through telegraph. (That new device called “radio” would’t make the scene for a couple of more years, assuming it would ever catch on!) The last time the team played in the world series was back in 1945. If anyone wanted to see the game without being at the ball park, one could await for that new fangled device called “television” that was like radio but with pictures. (Would “TV” ever catch on? Who knew?) Today, one could have seen the game via their smartphone and anything else that sported a video screen. However, there is “virtual reality” where one could see the game–or anything else for that matter, through 3D pictures and ultra stereo sound no matter where one could be located. (Will “VR” catch on? Who knows??)
Although yours truly never paid much attention to the team over the many years, this writer does hold a vague connection to the team and their involvement in the world series. First, I was a first generation “Bleacher Bum”, the name of a catchall group of fans who used to watch the game from the Wrigley Field bleachers aka the “cheap seats”. Many of their fans would sport yellow construction workers hard hats to show off they were part of the “bums” crew. Yours truly as a youngin’ would head on over to the park with an elder sibling to take on a game or three during the summer months donning those hard hats that were purchased from a very long forgotten garage sale. I would watch the game with my trusty Ross eight transistor radio on hand so I could hear the play-by-play over WGN. As to another connection, my great uncle Hank Borowy was part of the team and indeed play in the ’45 series. I never saw him play, but from what I was told from fans from back in the day, he pitched a decent game. In fact, I never met him, so he is one of the many relatives within my family tree that I never crossed paths with. So much for those close family ties.
But nevertheless, they won the game and good for them! Now we can get on to other mattes in hand. One important matter is the big election that’s been part of the news landscape for some time!
After what seems like months, perhaps years in the making, tomorrow (November 8th) is that election day, the moment of truth where the public at large casts their ballots to vote upon a lot of issues, as well as choosing who’s going to run the good ol’ US of A!
We don’t have to tell you on the people that are lead up to becoming the next king or queen of the nation. (If by chance you don’t know, then stop reading this edition and hide in your cave!) But for the rest of you, you already know what’s going on, so we won’t waste your time giving you the same information that’s been spread twelve times over the media landscape. However, since election day is something one can’t ignore, we will present our basic commentary on what to expect, what not to expect, and everything else in between.
For starters, we won’t give our opinion on anything about the election, or even what’s on the ballot. In California were we are based in, there are a lot of propositions that’s up for grabs. Some are rather boring but important in their own right, while others are more of an issue for concern. This writer doesn’t have all of the facts and figures on hand to discuss everything on the ballot in writing, but that is what search engines are for. If anyone in any state desires to get a basic overview to what is going to have a “yay” or “nay” within their neck of the woods, just type in the name or the number of the proposition, and let cyberspace takes its course.
As to everything else, we have a rule here at Accessibly Live Off-Line, One of the elements we stand upon is to never give any opinions or commentaries on anyone or anything found on an election ballot. In other words, we ain’t gonna tell you to vote for this or what. We stand totally neutral on all of the elements this election day is going to face. All of those decisions and choices will be placed in your hands!
This is not to state that we don’t care on who or what is going to be chosen. We do have our concerns and will support our own causes and issues. These same causes will be relieved when the time and place is ideal to comment upon. As you the readers may notice, this moment isn’t the right time or place.
So we’re gonna keep this editorial short and sweet. We will state that if you can vote or even have a desire to do so, then please trek on over to your local polling place and  cast that ballot. If you can’t be there in person, then fill out an absentee ballot and proceed normally. For the rest of you that will decide to do anything but vote, then that’s OK for what that is. Whatever the case, the election will occur if you choose to vote or not! We’ll just state that let the best man or woman win! As for us, we’ll make sure that things will happen for the better or otherwise! Just don’t say that we didn’t warn you!
Now…there is that Ron Santo baseball card he signed for me back in 1969? Maybe it’s still in that cigar box I placed it in those years ago! But where is the cigar box…?
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NEWS AND REVIEWS
Theatre Palisades closes out their 2016 season with Charles Busch’s THE TALE OF THE ALLERGIST’S WIFE, an offbeat comedy about one woman’s search of a meaning of her existence, and a second woman that enters her life becoming her best friend that holds an intention of its own.
Lauren Leitner is Marjorie, a middle aged woman living in Manhattan’s upper west wide who is recovering from her emotional breakdown. Her life in general has its moments. She has been married to her husband Ira (Phil Bartolf), a recently retired doctor who still can’t away from doing his work, taking on an occasional client. Marjorie’s mother Frieda (Lois Bostwick), lives down the hall of their apartment. Marjorie is a woman of unique tastes, reading the works of obscure authors, and taking on lectures, films, and live performances that are as eclectic if not totally oft kilter. Frieda’s main interest is the status of how her intestines are properly working and her attempts of keeping regular. One day, Lee (Kim Kensington), walks into Marjorie’s life right out of the blue. Lee and Marjorie grew up at the same Bronx neighborhood around the same time. They quickly bond with the same eclectic tastes they share. But there is something rather unconventional about Lee. She had many occupations that range from unusual to nearly bizarre, and claims to know a lot of well known people. But she still keeps a secrecy about herself and what she presently does for a living. But makes things rather complex is the fact that she holds other interests that go beyond close friendship. What is the purpose in this scheme? Is Lee a real BFF to Marjorie? And will Frieda ever get to has a successful BM?
This rather quirky comedy is the kind that holds lots of laughs for the subject matter while teetering on toward risqué moments. It expresses upon a person’s quest for discovering a real purpose of living their life on earth, while exploring notions of curiosity, self alliance, with a touch of inner fantasy added for good measure. The cast that appear in this Theatre Palisades production present their performances in a realistic stance, even when the plotting is off track in its pleasing way. Ria Parody Erich directs this show as a self progressive program that is just as amusing as the subject matter this stage piece speaks upon through its characters. Although the comedy is anything but dull–far from that–it may not at times cater to selected tastes so be forewarned! But if one is engaged with topics and plot points found in feature films of late or in post modern television programs, then this play is right on top of things and then some!
In addition to note is the set design created by Sherman Wayne and William Pitcher that show off the respectful unit where Marjorie and company dwell.
Also appearing within the cast is Brldley Orok as Mohammed, the humble doorman of the apartment unit where all of the stage play’s action takes place.
THE TALE OF THE ALLERGIST’S WIFE is not your typical community theatre piece. It’s highly entertaining indeed, and might give one a thought to where one places themselves within their life. Granted, one may not necessarily find an old friend from out of nowhere that had been almost everywhere, doing things one can barley fantom while dropping off a famous name or three. One can nearly wish for this to happen. But because one can do such doesn’t mean one won’t get their desire granted. But this is theatre, and it’s presented in Pacific Palisades!

THE TALE OF THE ALLERGIST’S WIFE, presented by Theater Palisades, performs at the Pierson Playhouse, 941 Temescal Canyon Road (off Sunset Blvd.), Pacific Palisades, until December 11th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM.
     Theatre Palisades has already announced their 2017 season of plays and musicals. For more information on all performances and for ticket reservations, call (310) 454-1970, or visit online at http://www.TheatrePalisades.com
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Casa 0101 Theatre of Boyle Heights presents the Los Angeles premier of Karen Zacarias’ MARIELA IN THE DESERT, a drama about a young woman living in Mexico, the daughter of once prominent artists who became caught within the shadow of her parents, and the works that were introduced within the world of North American art.
The setting is a ranch located within a desert community of northern Mexico at the halfway point of the 20th century. This ranch is the home of Jose Salvatierra (Vance Valencia) and his spouse Mariela. (Rachel Gonzalez). A number of years earlier, Jose and Mariela were part of the booming art culture developing in Mexico City where budding artists were making their mark within the art world, mingling with such artists as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo. They decided to build a ranch that would serve as an artist colony where these emerging artists can work to develop their unique talents that were part of the new artistic movement. They bore two offspring, son Carlos (Kenneth Lopez) and daughter Blanca. (Vannessa Vasquez). Carlos never developed his talents as his life ended at a young age. But Blanca attempted to make her mark as an artist. In the current times, Jose’s career is within the past as he is slowly dying of diabetes with Mariela and his sister Olivia (Denise Blasor) at his side. Blanca takes up with Adam Lovitz (Randy Vasquez), an American professor of art who is writing a book of the artists of Mexico, and is interested in adding Jose as part of his writings. One noted piece that Jose created is the subject of his interest. But upon his entry to the family, a secret is brought forth to this noteworthy artist’s creation that has been hidden for an extended spell.
This production as presented by the Angel City Theatre Ensemble is a solid presentation that places its emphasis of the art movement that existed in Mexico in the first few decades of the 20th century. This story’s timeline shifts back and forth during this period where Jose and Mariela’s promising career within the tight artist circles were nurtured and developed yet set aside through various circumstances. The cast of six players as seen in this program work together in a harmonious method with the careful aid of Robert Beltran’s stage direction.
In addition to the performance as viewed within this production, Marco De Leon’s set design shows the ranch space as a spacious tract that appears as promising as the artistic family’s placement. Yee Eun Nam’s projection design changes the mood and setting through still imagery projected onto the backdrops, expressing the points to the storyline and to Jose and his brood as they settle within their existence in terms of family, art, and points in between.
The Casa 0101 theatre space is located within a part of Boyle Heights that is currently undergoing a renaissance juncture. It’s noted that this place may be a bit hard to find as the theatre is nestled within a block of local businesses and related storefronts. However, the journey to experience this play, as well as the theatre space itself, is worth the trip. Art showings of works by local artists line the walls and display spaces found within this theatre, giving patrons an opportunity to view the talents of these same artists that are placed on canvas and related forms of medium. These elements bring the vibrant aspects that this part of the city presents as located just a short distance away for the enterprising downtown region.

MARIELA IN THE DESERT, presented by the Angel City Theatre Ensemble, performs at the Casa 0101 Theatre, 2102 East First Street, Los Angeles (Boyle Heights), until December 11th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 5:00 PM. No performances on November 25th, 26th, and 27th. (Thanksgiving weekend).
     For more information and for ticket reservations, call (323) 263-7684, or via online at http://www.Casa0101.org
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2016 Linear Cycle Productions.
All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not                                                         necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

THE CRASH OF THE HOLIDAYS or THE SHOPPING THAT IS YET TO COME

This issue is being released on Halloween, that time of year where things tend to go bump in the night. The weekend before saw a lot of Halloween type parties taking place, loaded with the usual end of October antics complete with party food, beverages (spiked or otherwise), as well as folks dressed up in characters from traditional (the spooky type) to those that are trendy for the moment. (Too many Donalds and Hillerys out there to count!)
However, in spite of all of the harry and scary shenanigans, one holiday season that has already made its mark on the domestic scene is the period named with the generic sounding title called “The Holidays”, the time of year that blends Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, and all other occasions (real or otherwise) that fall within the month of December that call for the exchange of gifts and related rituals.
Ever since the Columbus Day weekend, or for the folks up in Canada, the Thanksgiving Day weekend, many of the retail outlets has already started upon the holiday shopping blitz. These retails outlets both big and small working online and offline, find this time of year as the most profitable where sales of goods are at their peak. Many of these outlets tend to push their goods that same month even when the items are not necessarily seasonal per se, but are the types one tends to get as a gift, usually as an afterthought. Scented candles and boxed cheese, crackers, and smoked sausage kits tend to fall within this category. (And no offense given or implied to scented candles and boxed cheese sets retailers!)
Gift getting is all just another part of the shopping experience. This form of retail experience has made a drastic change over the last twenty or so years. From the classic method of trekking to the shopping malls from getting all the post modern way of grabbing the goods online, the art of holiday shopping is an art to itself, if not a complex strategy in its own right.
Findings from a project recently conducted by the marking firm RadiumOne proves these points. In their report, called RadiumOne Data Report 2016: Unlocking the Value of The Holidays found that folks will be at their stores with their electronic devices in hand to not only find the best bargain around, but will know nearly anything and everything on what they will buy, with their might buy, and even where and when to buy the products.
In the report, based upon the results found the previous season of October through December 2015 and data collected from 1000 survey responses, discovered that 38% of consumers will search, research and purchase their gifts online, with only 8% researching and shopping in-store. 43% will use only one device while shopping (smartphones mostly) but 29% will have more than one gadget to assist.
Social media will play a big role in shopping with the exchange of sharing information on who’s got what as the best deal. Although places as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and others will play a role, most of the sharing of info occurs in what’s called “dark social channels” consisting of emails, text messages, and instant messaging.
Demographics will play a big role, too. Those of the Millennium age (18-34) will purchase clothing. Those age 65+ will purchase gift cards. Three out of five consumers will start planning their seasonal shopping within three months of the season. Men will wait longer than women,  28% will wait until the final month, and 5% wait until the final week!
And although this fact doesn’t have much to do with shopping, the report states that folks will watch more TV during the holiday season, but not as much as the previous year. 58% said they will watch more TV during the season, down from 9% in 2015. Some 69% of Millennials will also watch more TV, but it will be down from 11% as noted from 2015.
And for the record, this year marks the 50th anniversary when CBS first aired the animated special, Dr. Susses’ How The Grinch Store Christmas, directed by Charles M. “Chuck” Jones, thats been on the air every year since 1966 when that holiday was called “Christmas”!
So as the frost gleams on the pumpkins while adults, who pretty much took over the holiday of Halloween, are out having a great time sporting blue colored sack dresses with pearls around their neck or folks wearing suits with red ties around their necks sporting bad looking toupees, just make sure you get what you want for any holiday! It won’t get better that that!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS
The Eclectic Company Theatre presents WEED SHOP THE MUSICAL, a tuneful tale that blends a “boy meets girl” story within a background of “herbal healing”.
Nate Werner stars as Dave, a proprietor of a medical marijuana establishment aka a “weed shop”-one of those places that dispense such herbal remedies found in California, or specifically, Los Angeles. He is presently involved with Stephanie (Katie Porter), a slightly older and somewhat conservative woman who is an opposite of Dave. She is totally against the substance Dave dispenses, in spite of the fact that it’s all legal just as long it’s for “medical” purposes. Dave keeps a relationship with this woman because she’s the only woman he can find. Not too far away from Dave’s shop is Alicia (Amanda Charney), a doctor who writes up prescriptions for herbal remedies to anyone who desires to be cured (or close to a cure) for their “illnesses”. Dave’s business partner Kyle (Mandie Hitterman) senses that Dave is waisting his time being involved with somebody who thinks otherwise of the goods he sells. He eventually meets up with Alicia,, but the two make an attempt to hide on what they really do, not knowing that they are in the same line of work involving weed. Will Dave and Alicia find out that their desire of weed may bring them together? Will Stephanie ever get back with Dave, even though he won’t give up his business? And will she ever change her ways from her attitude to her partner choice?
This new musical with book, music, and lyrics by Becca Grumet & Madelyne Hayman is a very lively production that contains a lot of wit along with a selection of tunes that bring out the sprit to what weed in LA is all about! It’s also serves as a post modern version of a classic romantic comedy. There are many comical bits scattered throughout this show that just enhance the situations the lead characters face, all set within a great musical score as arranged by Amanda Yamate. (The band that performs the musical score live and off-stage consists of Audrey Rosenberg on keyboards, Roger Hallaway on guitar, and Matthew Jamele on percussion.) Jacob Krech provides the choreography where many of the performers that appear in this program can indeed sing and dance!
In addition to the lead players, the cast consist of as listed in their alphabetical order, Beckie Blosser, Mike Bowers, Adam Chacon, Erin Cote, Julia Finkelstein, Jennie Floyed, Gabriel Mark, Christine Martini, and Nate Werner.
Directed by Madelyne Heyman, WEED SHOP THE MUSICAL, contains a lot of charming bits that reach new highs in weed-based musical theatre! This joint jumps where no ston(ers) are unturned! Even if one never lights up, one will enjoy this show for its biting wit. And it even has a happy ending too! One can’t get any better than that!

  WEED SHOP THE MUSICAL, presented by OMG Brunch! Productions, and performs at The Eclectic Company Theatre, 312 Laurel Canyon Blvd, Valley Village (Los Angeles proper), until December 4th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM. For further information and for ticket reservations, visit the musical’s official website at http://www.WeedShopTheMusical.com
    “Like” them on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/WeedShopLA
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Continuing its run at the Glendale Centre Theatre is SHERLOCK HOLMES: THE FINAL ADVENTURE, a tale of mystery, suspense, and thrills, set within the notion that might just be the concluding chapter of the career of the world’s most famous detective.
The set opens in London in the waining years of the 19th century at 221B Baker Street. Sherlock Holmes (Tom Killam) sets upon a case that involves blackmail. The ruling king of the nation of Bohemia (Kevin Maphis) comes for the aid of Homes for a case between himself and Irene Adler (Meghan Blakley), a well known star of the opera stage. The King will be married in two weeks time to another woman, yet a photograph exists that link the King and Adler taken when the two were involved in a romantic connection. (Adler herself plans to marry someone else!) Homes, along with his trusty assistant Dr. John Watson (Brian Middleton) are off to get that photograph. There is yet another connection to this situation with Homes’ arch enemy Professor Moriaty (Shawn Cahill), who has schemes of his own. Is this case indeed the final one for the master detective, and will the professor seek the long awaited revenge that sparked his evil conquest?
This play recently adapted by Steven Dietz based upon the c.1899 play penned by Arthur Conan Doyle & William Gillette, holds all of the drama, thrills, suspense, and plot twists expected in an intriguing Sherlock Homes mystery. There is plenty of action as well that blends much of the fore noted thrills that is depicted on the GCT theatre-in-the-round space. All of the characters that are part of the Sherlock Holmes saga are represented here along with a few new ones. Tom Killam is the wise Holmes what in spite of his legionary work solving mysteries, appears on his final stages. Brian Middleton as Dr. Watson is the aide that is just as sharp as ever! Shawn Cahill as Professor Moriaty is the sinister one, always looking to place an end to his rival. Todd Nielsen directs this show as a play that is very heavy on the drama and suspense mode that remains as true to the Holmes legacy. Angela Manke, the GCT’s resident costumer, has the cast in fashions that is well documented to the era. (Holmes’ choice of head ware consists of period top hats, but never donning deerstalker gear!)
Also part of the cast is James Paul Xavier as Sid Prince, Aaron McGhee as James Larabee, Tosca Minotto as Madge Larabee, with Devin Dimitri Dominguez and Javy Pagan appearing as the Baker Street Irregulars.
This production, the final non-seasonal program for the 2016 calendar year is riveting, captivating, and holds plenty of plot turns. It’s a great way not only for this theatre to conclude a well respected season, but adds toward the mood set for late fall. Fans and those that appreciate this selection of classic detective literature will appreciate this stage production where the game is afoot indeed with much of the danger added for close effect.

SHERLOCK HOLMES: THE FINAL ADVENTURE, presented by and performs at the Glendale Centre Theatre. 324 North Orange Street, Glendale, until November 19th. Showtimes are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings at 8:00 PM, and Saturday matinees at 3:00 PM.
     Coming up next at the GCT is their 51st annual presentation of Charles Dickens’ evergreen tale A Christmas Carol, opening on November 25th and runs through December 24th.
     For more information of all shows appearing and for ticket reservations, call (818) 244-8481, or visit the GCT’s web site at http://www.GlendaleCentreTheatre.com
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2016 Linear Cycle Productions.
All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and                                                                 not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

THE YOUNG AND THE WIRED

Filing this report in the “Stuff we already knew” department, Verve Mobile, a media based company that places advertising campaigns as phone apps and related elements, recently released a report on how the so-called Millennials and Generation “Z” demographic groups utilizes their hand held electronic gadgets with an emphasis placed on smartphone devices.
The report, based upon surveying 3,000 people ages 14–29 in selected focus groups, found such details and insights from the report with basic facts as:
-60% of Mobile Prodigies ages 14–17 would prefer to lose their wallet instead of their phone.
     -80% of Mobile Prodigies said that they spend more time on mobile apps than a year ago.
     -95% of Mobile Prodigies said that they make purchases in brick-and-mortar stores based on ads that they have seen on their mobile device.
-46% spend more time daily on mobile devices than they do watching television and, if forced to choose, none of them would keep their TV over their mobile device.
There were some other facts and figures as well. However, this writer’s review will only concentrate on what’s being mentioned within this article.
Before yours truly goes on further, it’s assumed that the reader is asking. “What exactly is a “Millennial and a Generation “Z” person?” For the record, a Millennial is a person that was born between 1980 through 1998–give or take a year of two. A “Generation Z”, or “Gen Z” is someone under the age of eighteen yet old enough to understand what’s going around the person. Generally speaking, it’s somebody from age eight born around 2008, using this year (2016) as a reference point.
And the “Mobile Prodigies” name? That was invented by the folks at Verve Media to describe somebody who can’t remember life without the internet, cell phones, and related apparatuses in the same mode as “Baby Boomers” can’t recall life without television, or at least being aware that it exists.
It’s pretty obvious that such a company as Verve Media would conduct such a survey. Since they provide ad space and presence in hand held devices for their clients, they desire to work with such companies that have an interest in providing details on a product or service that would cater to this type of groups of youth. But with all said and done, the report also lists facts and figures that had been already known or assumed by the general public.
For anyone that has some type of connection with anyone of that said age demographic, be it a parent, grandparent, co-worker, or somebody within one’s domain and if these young(er) folks live and exist in today’s post-modern domestic society, one will know that the under 30-ish crowd will use their phone devices as they would use air on a daily basis.
If the reader doesn’t believe the fact expressed within this article, step on over to the local coffee house located in nearly every urban neighborhood and watch how many of these types have their phones at bay. They may be gawking at their screens, or just having them in nearly plain view ready to use within seconds–the same way that those old cowpokes on TV used to have their guns ready for some quick draw action! (To confirm this fact, just ask any “Baby Boomer” that watched TV from 1948 onward, and chances were they they tuned on to a TV western or perhaps a rerun from a “B” western feature created in the 1930’s and 40’s!)
Those Millennials and Gen Zs are currently the “poster children” in terms of advertising, social media presence, and general public attention. Granted, many of the selected sect (those from 25 through 35), have seen a few ups and downs in their lives that were not necessarily of their making, such as holding massive student loan debt, being hard hit victims from the Great Recession and its aftermaths, along with other episodes that made life suck but still have benefit in carrying the torch through the next few generations ahead. That holding the torch may be a bit heavier, but there is the notion of hope and toward rising to the occasion.
This is a refection of sorts that were fist placed upon the previous demographic, the “Generation X” crowd first when through in the 1990’s. (“Gen X” refers to those born c.1965 through 1979–give or take a year!) This was the generation that were first exposed to the internet and what it could offer as well as computer devices for home and personal use. They also started to dabble with cell phones around the turn of the 21st century when these devices and the phone services that went along with them were first made practical. Many, but not all, were also victims of busted families due to divorce. They may also have been over watched by their parents and/or caregivers thanks to notions that either existed or were assumed. At the same time, those were the ones that first expressed they became the under achievers, and made off in a worse shape age-wise as the previous generation (those pesky Baby Boomers) were at the same time of life. However, everyone tended to come out all right to progress in their own methods.
But as to the report as noted within this article stated about. It’s already confirmed that those in their early 30’s, 20’s, teens, and single digits, find their phones to be the be all to end all. That’s OK for what it is. It’s expressed in the same method as any other generation would in this society. A lot of these traits, real or otherwise, is played as comedy relief. As attention spans grow shorter, one has to be entertained right away. If they are not amused, they won’t come back!
And is this lack of return a good thing? It all depends on who you ask. After all, why dose Google exist in the first place?
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NEWS AND REVIEWS
The Edgemar Center for the Arts in Santa Monica presents the west coast premier of Warren Doody’s LIFE WITHOUT PAROLE, a play that focus upon a number of woman serving time for their murder of their domestic partners, and the backstory toward each one.
The story centers around the parole hearing of Helen Broker (Vivian Vanderwerd), serving twenty five years to life for the murder of her spouse. Her hearing, taking place at the California Institution for Women in Chino, California where she is housed, consist of three hearing board personnel. The prosiding “judge” Kellerman (Brook Joseph) instigates Helen in order to discover if she is fit for release. Upon the many questions she is asked during her hearing, she states that she belongs to an inmate run support group for those doing time for the murder of their husbands, boyfriends, and family members due to physical and/or emotional abuse. Those within her group come from different backgrounds and lifestyles. Some were raised through vile conditions while others lived well-off lives. However, they all hold one element in common: They were with another man that took harsh advantage of them, down to a point where the only way out was to end their life, usually with a firearm. Upon going through her hearing, Helen will wait if she will be deemed fit to live within society, or if she will live the rest of her days behind bars–along with the others in for similar reasons!
This theatre production by Warren Doody was extracted upon actual cases and episodes the playwright studied through previous research conducted by the late Dr. Elizabeth Dermody Leonard, taken from interviews of a number of women that were convicted for second degree murder of their domestic partners due to some form of abuse. Although the cases and characters depicted in this stage work were modified for theatrical purposes, the situations are very real, down to the depiction of the parol hearing itself that is conducted not for the benefit of the prisoner. This play focuses upon the Helen character along with four others that are on the inside: Barbara (Amanda Zarr), Charlotte (Maria Mayenzet), Grace (Cynthia Moreno), and Sherie (Lola Kelly). They tell their stories as well in a non-linear fashion. In spite of the fact they did indeed committed the crime of murder, their reasons behind it all were not because of jealousy or hate; It was for basic survival! Susan K. Berkompas directs this production that discloses each woman as victims to the people they thought they loved, and as victims of circumstance.
Also appearing in this production is Virginia Brown as parole board secretary Shaeffer, and Mark Piatelli is a duo role as a parole board clerk and the various husbands/boyfriends of the other women.
LIFE WITHOUT PAROLE is a very intense one-act play that doesn’t necessarily take sides to the women and the justice system. One can debate upon the stories depicted if the actions that occurred were indeed justified, or if the legacy rule of two wrongs not making a right still stand. Whatever the debate and whatever the outcome, the performances rank as one of an element of importance found within post modern society.

     LIFE WITHOUT PAROLE, presented by the American Coast Theatre Company, performs at The Edgemar Center for the Arts (Theatre “B”), 2437 Main Street, Santa Monica, until November 5th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM. For ticket reservations or for more information, call (310) 392-7327, or via online at http://www.EdgemarCenter.org
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Continuing its run at Theatre 68 in North Hollywood is the west coast premier of the stage adaptation of John Grisham’s A TIME TO KILL, a courtroom drama of an attorney who handles a case involving a man who murdered the men who abused his young daughter.
In a small town in Mississippi, a hideous crime was committed. Two young white men took liberties with a ten year old black girl. The girl’s father Carl Lee Hailey (Bechir Sylvain, alternating with Dayo Ade) shot the two accused men right after their courtroom hearing. As a man now accused with murder in the first degree, Carl seeks the aid of attorney Jake Brigance. (Iam Robert Peterson) Jake find this measure as an act of vengeance as the two now dead men were white and Carl is black–all existing in a community where racism is very much alive. Jake does fight for this doomed man, although this battle may be within a steep uphill mode. The district attorney assigned to this case Rufus R. Buckley (Gregory Thirloway) operates in a slick method, ready, willing, and able to place this man behind bars for a long time, if not sentenced toward death! Jake faces many odds in winning the case, from the DA to the local chapter of the KKK. Jake does receive an offer to assist him to win this courtroom battle within the realm of eager law student Ellen Roark (Mercedes Manning) that believes in the case’s moral cause. With this ragtag team, Jake goes all out proving that his client’s act was not done for ill means, but for the backlash he had faced just because he is black living in a white ruled community.
This play based upon John Grisham’s same named novel and adapted for the stage by Rupert Holmes, is a gripping courtroom epic that never lets go from its opening scene down to its final moments. There are many climaxes depicted throughout this production, an element that is rarely seen within a stage play. (That kind of thrilling drama is usually reserved for a video program or a feature film!) The lead players that appear in this production perform their roles within the same method to the drama’s velocity as depicted on stage, never letting the dramatic flow settle while leading toward more climaxas as one can even tally. Ronnie Marmo, who has directed previous stage productions produced by Theatre 68 (90 plus), helms this program that is just as gripping at the content itself.
Outside of the performers that appear in this stage work that also include Ian Peterson, John William Young, Hansford Prince, Peter Ostereli, Paul Thomas Arnold, Ari Thompson, Heidi Rhodes, Jalil Houssian, Steven Jones, Robert Domonick Jones, Joe Capucini, Jenny Nwene, Christopher Kelly, Caroline Simone O’Brian, Jarrod Robbins, and Steven Wu, there are the other visuals to take note. Danny Cistone’s set design of the courtroom is set to detail, while Christopher Hirtz’s multi media effects enhance the realism this play depicts.
This production is the first show performing at Theatre 68’s new space. The theatre itself, formally known as the Antaeus/Deaf West Theatre, has recently been remodeled and upgraded into a dazzling place where live theatre continues to thrive in North Hollywood, a community that has become a local “hot spot” for the performing arts. It’s a great place to see theatre in this part of the San Fernando Valley region.
A TIME TO KILL is a gripping courtroom drama that moves along in a very absorbing  stride. Even with a two plus hour running time (not counting the fifteen minute intermission), one will indeed receive their money’s worth! This is a show that is not to be missed!

A TIME TO KILL, presented by Theatre 68, and performs at Theatre 68, 5112 Lankershim Blvd. (two blocks south of Magnolia Blvd.) North Hollywood, until November 19th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 7:30 PM, and Sunday matinees at 3:00 PM. For more information, call (323) 960-5068, or via online at http://www.Theatre68.com. Tickets can also be reserved at http://www.plays411.com/TimeToKill
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2016 Linear Cycle Productions.
All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and                                                 not necessarily  of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!