TEN YEARS AHEAD FIFTY YEARS BACK-PART 2

In last week’s edition, this writer was commenting upon a questionnaire written by one Betty Jones who was about to become a graduate of Lakewood Senior High School of Long Beach, California–Class of 1971.

Within this questionnaire, she was asked what her prediction were going to be for herself ten years after her graduation. That year would have been 1981 when she would be in her late 20‘s–28 years old or thereabouts.

On the back of this documents, she completed an easy that was addressed to herself ten years ahead. In other words, the Betty of 1971 would be composing a letter to the Betty of 1981 offering her advice and other words of wisdom to take heed.

Here is that easy she wrote, dated June 2nd, 1971…

Dear Betty of 1981,

Needless to say, it seems pretty silly writing a letter to myself but, by the time you read this letter, I won’t be myself anymore.

Right now, I know the mistakes that I don’t want to make when I am your age. I only hope you can look at this letter and say you didn’t make them. You probability have a family of your own now, and I hope you can remember the things that your parents did for you when you were the age of your children, so that your children will be as happy as you were. Remember not to hold on too tightly to the ones you love, for that is the quickest way to lose them.

Be happy always, and make everyone around you happy too! Remember the mistakes you made in your high school years, and help your children through their mistakes. Don’t try to stop them from living their own lives or give them too much advice. Let them find out things for themselves.

Well, there’s so much more I’d like to say and no room left to say it. Be happy and love life. Do as much as you can in the little time that God has given us on this earth. Good luck in life! See you in the world!

Sincerely,

Betty (1971) Class of ’71

On the upper left side of the letter was a likeness of a sun with a smiling face in its middle, and on the bottom right of the letter next to the “sincerely” is another smiling sun doodle.

This is all what is known of Betty. I don’t know if she went off to college, or if she indeed started a family, or to even know of this Betty Jones is still living. All that remains of her life is this questionnaire that was found stuck in the center of a hardcover book that was purchased at an estate sale long forgotten.

All we can say right now is for parents out there who has a “young adult” that became a graduate of some high school or equivalent source of education that will become part of the class of ’21. We can’t speak for your offspring, but we do hope for the best in this world. They may be heading off to a source of higher education, or to take some time off to “find themselves” (whatever that term means) or to make their proper choices. And if they want to seek out fame through social media, they are within the right demographic to do such. But as with everything out there, moderation is the key.

And this writer doesn’t transcribes these words as a parent. It’s all based on personal experiences and just “being there”. And yes, there is a connection to that phase and a feature film that starred Peter Sellers of the same name. (A registered film as part of the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry.) My connection was television, and my journey to the world was connected to those sources when the “big three” American TV networks ruled, even though I really didn’t care much of who indeed shot J.R.! But that’s for another episode as that stands!

——————————————————————————————————————-

When one thinks of “Summer Movies” one may conger up thoughs of a film (or series of films) that the season in question is set centered, such as the Gidget films released through Columba Pictures (or Columbia Pictures Television if one adds the TV film Gidget Grows Up), or the beach movies made famous through American International Pictures starring Frankie Avalon of top-40 rock and roll fame, and Annette Funicello who became the most successful ex-Mousekateer to ever grace the big and little screen. One may also connect a summer movie to a “epic” blockbuster film released between late April through later August that could be a remake, a reboot, and/or a sequalized “franchise” title that offers lots of explosions, gunfire, and other forms of CGI created scenes that service as the biggest source of income to the studios that bankrolls these sorts of movies for audience to view where the movie houses showing off these flicks sell a lot of popcorn in the process. (Hence the nickname of these kind of titles-”popcorn movies”!)

The above descriptions may be true to describe a summer movie. But there were a load of films released within the last 100 years or so that hold a focus to the summer solstice but are never referred to as a summer movie per se, outside of the fact that much of its plot takes place during this time of year.

John Malahy has composed a book that gives this definition to a summer movie into a new (sun) light! SUMMER MOVIES: 30 Sun-Drenched Classics (Running Press) is a book title where Malahy writes about two and a half dozen movies that are set within the good ol’ summertime in terms of its focus and depth. He writes about what these movies are all about, who appears within the feature, as well as adding little amusing and “gee-I-didn’t-know-that” tidbits in terms of the creation of the film, the geographic area to where the movie takes place, as well as an idea to view an additional title that gives off the same and theme of the featured noted and expressed, suggesting a double feature!

A good number of the films noted are the ones that are obvious to the season, such as MGM’s Summer Stock, Fox’s Moon Over Miami, the for noted Gidget and Frankie & Annette beach flicks among other titles, as well as movies where the summer heat plays a major part. Paramount’s Rear Window comes to mind as the story’s focus is looking through an open window to beat the summer heat. Ditto for Fox’s, The Seven Year Itch where a man has to send his wife and kids away from New York City for the summer since very few folks had air conditioning (and a neighbor as Marilyn Monroe), and Spike Lee’s Do The Right Thing that takes place on a hot summer in Bed-Sud Brooklyn, where the only way to beat the heat is to crack open a fire plug if not cranking up the Emerson window air conditioner placing a strain on Con-Ed’s electrical grid! And there’s even titles noted that may be overlooked, if not nearly forgotten, because of its rather obscure place in the film word, such as Lonesome, a 1928 silent feature released by Carl Laemmle’s Universal Pictures, or Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday, a 1953 release from France starring Jacques Tati who spends the season at a beach resort with comical results, and Smiles for a Summer Night, (Sommarnattens Leende) another world entry from Sweden directed by Ingmar Bergman where its American distributor billed this picture as “a sexy frolic” starring Sweden’s “most beautiful women”! Rounding off the collection are movies that do take place in summer but are more downplayed. (Embassy Pictures’ The Graduate, Vestron Pictures’ Dirty Dancing, and Sony Studios’ A League Of The Own come to mind.)

Loaded with photos from the films as well as glimpses of the original one sheet posters, this book is a great companion to have on hand while soaking up the sun, sand, and surf, while viewing a feature or two while on summer vacation wherever one may be!

Of course, it can’t post every film ever created that speaks for the season. (This reviewer’s personal favorite, Summer Holliday, a British film starring Cliff Richards isn’t present!) But after looking through the selections as found, it will make one search even deeper to sport other movies that speak for summertime where the livin’ is easy–or maybe not!

With an introduction by Leonard Maltin, movie-dom’s biggest film fan of them all, as well as having the “seal of approval” with Turner Classic Movies, the be-all-to-end all place to see those films from no so long ago, SUMMER MOVIES: 30 Sun-Drenched Classics will keep one busy well into the fall season! And most, if not all, titles mentioned in the book can be accessed through home video (both as in and out of print media), streaming on demand, as well as a running on TCM or where movies can be accessed, either on the little video screen or on the big theater screen when and where available.

And as the ads used to say (with neon laced billboards found within Miami-Dade and Broward County Florida with the likeness of the little pig-tailed girl showing off some rear end cleavage thanks to her pup), “Tan Don’t Burn-Use Coppertone”!

SUMMER MOVIES is available through all leading book sellers, both in-store and online.

——————————————————————————————————————-

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2021 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

TEN YEARS AHEAD FIFTY YEARS BACK-PART 1

Not so long ago, I bought some old books at some old estate sale now long forgotten. The books were a bunch of hard covers that came from an estate what lived in the same home since the 1960’s. The kids had since grown up and moved off on their own, while the parents lived in the house until the couple passed on.

This article isn’t about this couple who this writer did not know or know of! I just attended their estate sale! But what makes this sale unique is what I found tucked inside of one of the books I purchased.

Inside of one of the books was a page that was a page written by one of the kids named Betty Jones. She attended high school at Lakewood Senior High School located in Long Beach California, and was going to graduate in 1971. This would make Betty around the age of eighteen or so, meaning that was was born c.1953, making her 67-68 years old in 2021.

Right before she was going to complete her year, she filled out a 1971 Senior Time Capsule Questionnaire, as this questionnaire was called. On one side was a series of questions what one had to fill out the blanks. On the other side offered the questionnaire filler a place to write an easy to write a letter to one’s self ten years into the future. In this case, it was the “Betty Jones” of 1981.

On her entry dated June 2nd, 1971, she was asked about personal goals set by 1981. Question #1 asked if she would be married in 1981. “Yes” was her answer. Question #2-At what age would you marry? (“19”). How many children would you have? (“4”) Who do you believe you would marry? (“Doug Stodgel” was her answer.) How much education will you secured by 1981? (“At least four years of college” was her reply.) What would your occupation be? (“Politician or Performer”) Where will you be living in 1981? (“New York City”)

And there were a few personal questions rounding out the questionnaire, such as if the draft will still exist in 1981? (“Yes”) Will student unrest on college campuses still exist? (“No”) In what position do you feel we will be ecologically in 1981? (Her answer was “Much better than we are now!”) and the last question asked upon what definite problems have you had in this high school–with an asterisk noting that “This question is for you to determine whether or not this was a problem after ten years.” Betty replied that “I’ve been too busy to study and get good grades, and not applying myself enough”

What made this questionnaire interesting is what the Betty of 1971 wrote to the Betty of 1981–ten years into the future. This story about the Betty of tomorrow will be discussed in detail in the next article! Stay tuned!

——————————————————————————————————————-

IN THE HEIGHTS (Warner Bros.) is a musical tale about a group of eager and young citizens dwelling in a section of New York City who holds dreams of becoming big within their own ways and means.

The story takes place in the Washington Heights district of upper Manhattan, a working class neighborhood located due north or Harlem-a location far removed from the glimmer and glitz of Midtown that has shifted its demographics over the many years where much of its residents hail from Central America.

It tells the trails and tribulations of Usnavi (Anthony Ramos) who runs a small bodega he inherited from his late parents. His big dream is to restore a seaside cantina his dad once ran in a village located in his native place of origin in the Dominican Republic. There’s Vanessa (Melissa Barrera), who toils in a neighborhood hair salon who desires to become a fashion designer and perhaps run her own boutique one day. There’s Nina (Leslie Grace) a childhood friend of Usnavi who’s returned back from attending school at Stanford Univeristy-the first person in her family that is receiving a formal education beyond high school. There’s Benny (Corey Hawkins) another young man working as a dispatcher in a community car service company who has his own aspirations. Along with its various neighbors, family members (blood relatives or those “adapted”), and others dwelling within their patch of the barrio, each one holds the wish and desires that if their dreams are big enough, one can possibly reach the top to where they want to go no matter who they are, where they came from, and where they are heading toward–all among the vast shadows of the George Washington Bridge.

This musical feature film, based upon the stage musical of the same name conceived by Lin-Manuel Miranda (before he really struck gold with his other stage musical Hamilton) with music and lyrics by Miranda and screenplay by Quiara Alegría Hudes, who also composed the “book” for the stage version, is a light and rather “cleaned up” version of a tight-nite community where everyone knows one another and looks after each person to a degree. (This part of upper Manhattan is where both Lin-Manuel Miranda and Quiara Alegría Hudes hailed from. Thus, they write and speak from personal experience!) The area itself appears to be rather colorful in its own movie version way, full of scenes and descriptions that are very New York City centric, meaning if one ever lived in or near the NYC area, one can perhaps relate to. Other than that, it’s a community depicted to others outside the realm as one-part West Side Story and another part Sesame Street. This means that the people and places depicted are those that are free from the urban grit and grime one may find in such communities of late.

Also, each main character as depicted are first generation American citizens, although they do “keep real” with their roots while all were born in the USA and are not “illegals” by any means. However, this is a movie musical, not a documentary! So however the characters are depicted and the region to where they hang their hats are just part of the escapist forms of visual entertainment that is desperately needed in these current times as folks are just starting to get out of their shells and are looking for summertime movies that is rather “fun” to look at–no matter what kind of environment they may be in at the moment.

And speaking of current times, much, if not all, people involved in this feature both in front of the camera and behind are those that are what’s known as “people of color”. (i.e. Non white!) Jon M. Chu, the person behind the surprise hit film of 2018, Crazy Rich Asians, directs this piece in a form that is very amusing, upbeat, charming, and harks back to the times where movie musicals, especially those set in an urban setting–mostly in New York City rather than Chicago or any other urban towns located in the Northeast or Midwestern part of the USA, showcases a hamlet that’s the be-all place to be! A city that’s big, exciting, and full of heart and soul!!

The remaining cast fits the bill when it comes to diversity, such as Melissa Barrera (TV’s Vida), Olga Merediz (Broadway’s In the Heights), Daphne Rubin-Vega (Broadway’s Rent), Gregory Diaz IV (Broadway’s Matilda the Musical), Stephanie Beatriz (TV’s Brooklyn Nine-Nine), Dascha Polanco (TV’s Orange is the New Black) Jimmy Smits (The various Star Wars films), and Lin-Manuel Miranda himself as Piraguero the narrator. This reviewer placed their previous credits of the cast members as extracted from the press notes supplied through the Warner Bros. movie publicity department expressing the fact that they may not be big names stars so to speak, but have appeared in other properties well circulated among the streaming media circles.

As to the behind the scenes stuff. Alice Brooks (The Walking Dead) serves as its cinematographer giving the film its city-esque appearance. The costuming is by Mitchell Travers that presents its characters that urban barrio look including its female leads donning shorts that show off their legs. The set designs by Andrew Baseman give this film another urban presence to it all. (He also did the sets for Crazy Rich Asians, as well as The Trial of the Chicago 7, a title remembered more as a TV movie rather than a feature release that was suppose to play in selected movie houses.) And its choreography is by Christopher Scott, who previously worked with Chu on the Hulu TV streaming series The Legion of Extraordinary Dancers.

All in all, IN THE HEIGHTS is still an appealing title to view. It does have a rather long running time for a movie musical, clocking in at around two hours, twenty minutes–give or take! But for those that wish to see it in a real movie theater, make sure to bring along your extra large bladder or to hold off guzzling those large cups of fizzy soda pop! For those viewing it on HBO Max, Warner Media’s streaming service, one doesn’t have to worry about these little things. When nature calls, just hit the pause “button” on your device, step away to do your duty, and return to where one left off. Everyone will be waiting for you so they can sing and dance through the phrases of living life in the barrio.

This feature is rated “PG-13” for mild cussing and for “suggestive references”–whatever that means! Now appealing in selected movie theaters that may be open in your community, or through streaming via HBO Max for 31 days from its theatrical release date or until July 11th or thereabouts.

——————————————————————————————————————-

QUEEN BEES (Universal/Gravitas Ventures) is a comical look to where a woman of age is forced into a setting to live with others of her own kind, only to discover that their attitudes they hold haven’t changed too much since their adolescence days as both for the bad and good!

Ellen Burstyn stars as Helen, a widow who desires to live independent, but really can’t seem to keep up. Her adult daughter Laura (Elizabeth Mitchell) insists that she moves into a local senior community center, but flatly refuses. Laura’s young adult son Peter (Matthew Barnes) cares for his grandmother, but also shows his own concerns, even making sure he keep on hand an extra key to her place in case she locks herself out. One evening while cooking something on the stove. Helen does lock herself out. The pot on the stove burns resulting with a kitchen fire. Laura then decides to place Helen into the senior home until her home is reconstructed. Helen is or course reluctant to relocate, but holds little choice in this relocation that she insists is only for a short time. Once settled into her new temporary digs, she see other people of her age, but not in the same behavior patterns as expected. She notices that the other ladies there are flirting with the few male residences, even having these same ladies “sharing” the male suitors. But what makes things change for her is when she meets a gaggle of three women known as the “queen bees”, consisting of Janet (Jane Curtin) the leader of the bunch, Margot (Ann Margret), and Sally (Loretta Devine). When there is an opening in the bees’ tight-nite bridge group, Helen is invited to join them. But Dan (James Cann) a man living at the home tries to woo Helen. She first resists Dan. But being a guy that won’t say “no”, he insists that the two can be something. Dan does hold a good heart and spirit, and Helen sees this. They do eventually become a couple, in spite of the fact that the other ladies has one less man to “share” with!

This little feature written by Donald Martin based upon a story by Harrison Powell, is a charming melodrama that is light in spirit as well as light in its dramatic and comical tone. (No real big laughs here!) Although the concept of a group of ladies playing so-called “mean girls” that’s far removed from bossy girls found in any domestic middle school and/or high school setting, that idea of elders playing kids as comedy relief never seems to jell as it could. However, it’s rather amusing to see a pack of well known film and TV stars make another appearance in a program such as this feature–somewhat in the same notion as an old episode of the TV series The Love Boat where its “special guest stars” are familiar faces from the TV and movie world to where the viewer could say “I though they were long dead!”, as their screen appearance would prove otherwise! Michael Lembeck, the son of character performer Harvey Lembeck, directs this film that holds enough grace and style in the same fashion as any mature woman of a selected age would show herself off to–cute and amusing, but that’s about it!

Along with the for noted stars, Christopher Lloyd is featured as Arthur–another male “catch” at the senior community, and French Steward as Ken, the manager of the senior center. French is not a big name star per se, but this writer has seen him play Buster Keaton in the stage production Stoneface at Hollywood’s Sacred Fools Theater a few years back.

As one can guess, this feature title has the seal of approval from the AARP as “the most AARP movie ever” in their collection of movies called Movies from Grownups that usually consists of films that are heavy in drama, and tends to cater to those over the age of 60–maybe even older! After all, its principles are all of that age bracket. Ellen Burstyn clocks in at 88 years, James Caan at 81, Jane Curtin 73, Ann-Margret 80, Loretta Devine 71, and Christopher Lloyd at 82. Michael Lembeck himself is 72 years old. And for the record, those age statistics were provided to this reviewer by the AARP itself, proving to those in the know that folks of these elevated ages can still get work. After all, President Joe of the USA is pushing 80, so there still is hope! Maybe eighty may not be the new eighteen as Jace Curtin’s character Janet states, but this is all besides the point!

QUEEN BEES is rated “PG-13” for TV-type cussing as well as for milder drug usage. (Dope smoking.) Now playing is selected theaters where available, and through streaming video on demand.

——————————————————————————————————————-

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2021 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

THE “NEW” NORMAL III

In the current issue of Time Magazine (June 2nd-24th, ’21) its cover story dealt with “The Great Reopening”. Gracing its cover was a hanging sign that stores would place on their doors that had a clock face that told when the shop keeper steps out for the moment, and when that same shop keeper would eventually return.

Instead of numbers on the clock face that gave the time when the said shop keeper would return, it has phrases that stated “Please Get Me Out Of This House”, “When My Kids Are Back In School”, “Wearing Sweatpants”, “3 Days A Week” “Are You Paying For Childcare?” and even “How About Never?” These meanings are telling what people will be doing when things get back to as normal are they are going to get. People do desire to get back with their lives, but not necessarily in the same fashion before all hell broke loose around the start of the week of March 15th, 2020.

Within those fifteen months, folks went through many phases in such a short period of time. Some of the phases were rather positive, such as taking the time to learn a new hobby, re-leaning an old hobby, developing a bond with close and not-so-close friends, family members, other people relations or otherwise that were once ignored and/or forgotten, and so on. The negative ones dealt with illness (catching the disease), death (dying from the disease), losing a job, suffering with what’s now called “food insecurity”, not being able to take care of personal expenses, etc. For quite a while, it was every (wo)man for themselves, while it sensed a notion that we were all in this together.

But based on how things stand on a local sense as well as a national one, it appears that the recovery is not too far off. It may be just right around the corner. And it might already arrived, but in a whole new look, appearance, and attitude.

Many of the things that did occur gave us new responsibilities and new ways to conduct everything from business, pleasure, and all in between! It made many realize that after what everyone has gone through, they want to start fresh and anew. And how they did things before and glanced at how they saw things after both physically and virtually, they don’t necessarily want to go back! They like it here in the new arena, and nobody and nothing is going to take it away from them, or even us! After all, from what everyone has experienced, don’t they are deserve more than what they should get?

This writer is pleased to report that yours truly has gone through the same emotions. I won’t get too specific as those notes will be explained in detail in Accessibly Live Off-Line’s annual “State Of The Union” address that will appear in Vol. 26-No. 27-Week of July 5th, 2021. And this writer isn’t an exception with it comes to being placed into a new template.

To give an idea in what we are speaking about, just about every movie and almost every theater production this writer had to opportunity to experience was done online through the portal of the year (or maybe the decade), called Zoom. In case you don’t know what Zoom is, it is a software program where anyone with a smartphone (which is just about everybody) and/or a desktop and/or laptop computer machine can communicate through audio and video. Many a meeting has taken place for school, business, and even for friendly (and not so friendly) chats with those that are connected within the same network. And yes, many stage theater companies have used this method in performing a show when their regular theater houses could not safely hold live performances.

To give you an idea of what this writer is..well, writing about, I recently saw a program that was performed by Gloria Gilford’s GGC Players theater company performing a production of Joseph Bologna and Renee Taylor’s modern classic play Lovers And Other Strangers, as presented as virtual theater performed in real time. The play itself is a romantic comedy about a young couple planing for marriage, the brides parents planning for a divorce, as well as a few bouts of infidelity tossed in for good measure. In other words, it’s around various misadventures of a family that’s f-ed up as anyone else’s! The play, through slightly dated in some spots, holds plenty of wit that has as much charm embedded within its dialogue without the obnoxious traits normally found in postmodern rom-coms of late.

The performers that appeared in this double cast production were played more-or-less as talking heads. It carried itself out not so much through physical stage movement, but as an elaborate radio show. (Yours truly didn’t really “see” much of it, but mostly heard it all without losing any of its momentum!) Granted, it wasn’t the same as experiencing this production in a traditional theater, but it made this writer’s job a lot easier to witness. I didn’t have to shlep to a specific location to the theater space, and I didn’t have to “dress up” to attend. Since this program was a one-way production (I could see them but they could not see me), I could have been dressed up in a tux, a grubby t-shirt and grubbier sweatpants, or even donning nothing at all! (Don’t worry folks! I’m not quite ready to experience theater in the nude, or not through the audience’s side!)

What I’m stating within this article is this point is that this new method of communication has taught those that went through the pandemic that it’s quite possible to have an online experience of something that can complement a real in-person activity. Granted, it’s been done way before 2020, but wasn’t taken as seriously with the notion that “nobody’s going to want to do video meeting online”! Well guess what folks? It’s been proven that it can be done and then some.

But as things start to open up, only time and tide will tell how it’s going to pan out, and how long its going to take its hold. If may change for the better. It may change for the worse. It might just go away only to become long forgotten. One can only guess when this “new normal” is going to stick. Let’s see who will become the real winners and real losers.

As Yogi Berra has been quoted to say, “It ain’t over ‘till It’s over”. And it’s far from being over! However, things are not as bad as it had been a year ago when people were franticly baking bread, hoarding toilet paper, painting their houses, and working on that 1000 piece jigsaw puzzle that features a likeness of the Cincinnati, Ohio skyline at dusk. (Don’t laugh folks. There is such a jigsaw puzzle like that, available online in cyberspace land!)I could add more into this column, but I’ve got to catch another Zoom meeting that’s starting up in just five minutes! (The first of three scheduled for today!) And I’ll be wearing that Hawaiian shirt once purchased at a long forgotten garage sale a few years back. Talk about being high on the fashion hog!!

——————————————————————————————————————-

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2021 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

THE “NEW” NORMAL II

There has been a lot of talk about a phase this society is going through as a “new normal”. This NN has been reflective upon the opening up after a fifteen month plus hibernation period that many folks have gone through thanks to the rise and fall(ing) of the Pandemic.

Of course, a new normal isn’t anything new. In fact, shifting from a “normal” to a “new” and not necessarily approved version of the “old” normal holds different means from one another.

Case in point. A few years ago, this nation went though a period of economic decline. This period was called “The Great Recession” since previous recessions–a moment of time where the economic state of the nation was not doing too well-came and eventually went, leaving within its aftermath, a state where people who were affected, such as to the point where their living spaces were in fate through loss of income and the loss of home ownership thanks to subprime mortgages that banks were issuing out through the early years of the 21st century.

In 2013, we placed an article that speaks upon a “new normal” that was forming. The article’s heading was of course, called The New Normal. Eventually, things did get back to normal, and that lasted up until the start of the third decade of the 21st century.

Here is that article as we presented it in Vol. 18-No. 20…

This seems to be one of the so-called “buzz phrases” that’s been kicking around within the last few years. According to the Oxford Dictionary, this term means “a previously unfamiliar or atypical situation that has become standard, usual, or expected.”

This phrase came from the rise of “The Great Recession” where everything from spending habits, general employment, and anything else that took a hard beating didn’t necessary recover even through the so-called economic “recession” supposedly ended a few years back! What is general refers to is the fact that what was once standard isn’t anymore, and what changed will be that way for quite a while, if not for good!

For example, being frugal with one’s money is now a “new normal” than just a temporary state of being. According to a recent poll conducted by The Gallup Organization, nearly three fourths (73%) stated that they are either spending the same amount of money or just spending less. 31% of those spending less is their “new normal” method of handling their cash flow. This states that those penny pinching folks will keep this method up for good rather than just for the moment.

There are a lot of reasons outside to economic concerns about keeping a new normal as part of a way of life. This also means a new acceptance in a lifestyle. A sitcom with the same phrase (The New Normal) that premiered at the start of the 2012-13 TV season on NBC emphasized upon the antics of a gay male couple seeking a baby. In a post modern world, a single sex “married” couple is a small yet existent part of the domestic landscape compared to twenty years ago where such a couple would be rather small in number, if existent at all. (For the record, NBC announced that this new sitcom that was expected to blaze a few trails so-to-speak, has been canceled!)

Changing one’s way of acting upon a moment or situation isn’t really new or unique. The self help craze that began in the 1970’s, taking off in the 80’s, and continued through the 90’s and well into the new millennium, noted from time to time about “inventing yourself”. It’s about changing with the times; not necessarily the domestic time, but the “times” one lives through based upon personal circumstances. Growing up emotionally fits into this reinvention. However, many folks don’t take growing up it stride, still acting the way they were in their teen years, even though they can be way past thirty! By the time one reaches forty (i.e. “middle age”), then acting the same way as a youth doesn’t cut it anymore and thus, going through the process through domestic life becomes something as a new normal.

Is one uses their favorite search engine typing in “the new normal”, one will receive a whole lot of answers to those three little words. Some will reflect upon what this article speaks about, and a few more choices flag down other unrelated matters. No matter what one may find, there is more than enough to ponder upon.

So as times get better, worse, or just stay the same, there will always be a normal, or a newer one to take its place. However, by the moment where things and events finally fall into its own set place, sure enough, something else is going to turn things about! This moment should not necessarily be labeled as a new normal. Then again, what is normal anyway? Perhaps that’s a topic for another issue as it’s normal enough to quit while one is ahead! And we can’t get farther ahead than that!

——————————————————————————————————————-

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2021 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

THE STREAMING WARS CONTINUE

Here’s more proof (if “proof” is actually needed) that streaming media ain’t going away!

Last week, Warner Media, the company owned by AT&T that has to its portfolio, CNN, TBS, HBO, Cartoon Network, Warner Bros. Studios, and other names in the media business that’s been around since the glory days of cable television, will be “getting married” to Discovery Networks, the company that features a load of domestic living channels, such as HGTV, Food Network, Discovery, and other media elements within their portfolio. These two sources will provide more content to those that wish to subscribe through streaming media, offering titles to pick through to see whenever and wherever people can view on any device that sports a video screen as well that can connect to a internet connection.

Amazon, the company that among other sources, sells everything including the kitchen sink, is in talks of acquiring MGM, the studio that holds a library of some 4000 titles including a selection from United Artists and includes among others, the James Bond feature films and other recent “modern” classic hits such as Fargo, Robocop, The Silence of the Lambs, and many others. This portfolio will add titles to Amazon Prime, a streaming service that is gaining in popularity and is heavily competing with Netflix, and Disney+.

This possible acquisition is not to be confused with the MGM and is better known as Metro-Goldwyn-Meyer, a studio once located in Culver City, California (not “Hollywood” as what’s stated at the end of MGM cartoons where they were “Made in Hollywood USA”), that became established in 1924. That MGM was purchased by Ted Turner in the middle 1980’s where its now part of Warner Media. That library consists of titles that were released through MGM from January 1st, 1924 through May 31st, 1986–just in case anyone is keeping score!

What this all means is that streaming media in now the hot source to receive and consume moving imagery content through electronic means. Although linear TV is still around, it’s being created with streaming in mind, meaning that if the traditional TV networks wishes to provide programming through over the air means, it will become available for streaming sooner or later. (More “sooner” than “later”!) ABC, CBS, Fox, and NBC are all “players” in the streaming business! And the movie studios are also involved as well as they are all connected to TV, from Paramount (Paramount + via CBSViacom), Universal through NBCUniversal’s Peacock, Sony Studios with arrangements with Netflix, Warner Bros. with WarnerMedia, and The Walt Disney Company with of course, Disney+. In the late teens, Disney bought the assets of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation, that now owners the entire Fox library for the purpose of streaming.

It’s been said in the business world that one should go where the money is. As of this moment, the big bucks are found in streaming services. With people now getting quite comfortable of getting their content through streaming thanks from being cooped up inside of their dwellings due to the results from the pandemic, it appears that people won’t break away from a habit that they actually enjoy in keeping. And because streaming is cheap(er) that traditional cable TV or even trekking off to a movie theater to view, well… movies, people will take that kind of offer.

After all, if it’s going to cost a whole lot less to get something where that “something” is brought to you verses the other way around, why not grab it? After all, free delivery is no longer a privileged option. It’s now expected!
As this Spring season will be turning into a Summer where the weather is nicer, and those orders to keep those ever lovin’ face masks on will be cast aside, folks may concentrate is doing so-called “normal” stuff, but with a twist! They won’t go back to the days where they had to engage themselves within a setting because that was the way to do things, but they will do those same actions as a “reboot” rather than a traditional “back to the way it is” or “back to the way it was” at least! And since a “reboot” is the post-modern way to describe an object or source as “new and improved”, they will go for that new and improved, leaving the old and not-as-improved version into the trash heaps for good. It will become a matter of time and tide to see who will become the next contestant in the streaming wars.

However, it may buckle down back to the notion that there may be 57 channels to get and there’s nothing on. Then again, you can’t please everyone out there. If you could, where would be the fun be in that??

——————————————————————————————————————-

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2021 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

ONE LESS AWARDS SHOW TO VIEW

Last week, NBC announced that due to the lack of diversity, as well for ethical impropriates among the staff and voters of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, a trade group of some 90 members that write about the entertainment industry to media sources based outside of the USA, decided not to televise the annual Golden Globes awards show in 2022.

The Golden Globe Awards, one of the most viewed entertainment award programs that is outside of the “big four” awards in media and entertainment, has been going through a recent shake up of its members and staff due to its lack of diversity (most members are white males), as well as other factors that caused NBC not to air this event next season.

The Golden Globes usually sets off the awards season for entertainment programs covering movies, television, recordings, and related factors. The season normally runs from early January and ends in late February with the presenting and telecasting of the Academy Awards. However, thanks to the pandemic, this year’s awards season ran some eight weeks behind schedule.

Within the January-February season, The Academy Awards a.k.a. The Oscars, as well as the Grammy Awards, are the only two from the big four that usually take place. The other two, the Tony Awards, usually takes place in early June, and the Emmys take place in early-middle September.

Awards shows and television has been a hand-in-hand notion for many decades. Its biggest draw was the roster of celebrities that usually appeared within these programs. It was always a thrill to TV viewers to see these so-called bigger than life stars to appear on their television screens. This was long true for The Oscars when movies and television existed as separate units. Movies were within their own world, and television was set in their universe.

For the Grammys, the only way that those in the music industry (musical bands or vocalists) would be seen on TV was usually as a guest spot in a variety program, most notably, The Ed Sullivan Show, among other programs of its ilk. The Tony Awards, for the best in New York-based Theater, has a unique approach as many of its actors and actresses, as well as those “behind the scenes” (authors, producers, etc.) that appeared as a presenter and/or as a award nominee wasn’t necessary a well known personality outside of the stage theater industry. And for The Emmy Awards, that was totally television! So those appearing for something or another was present within the medium they worked for and with.

But in recent years, the ratings for all of these award programs have been down in recent times. And there has been a lot of reasons why. Among the reasons, it was from the lack of knowledge on a massive scale of those nominated for an award and the source they were being nominated for. The Tony Awards presents awards for the best in stage theater for shows appearing on Broadway and in New York City. Unless one followers the theater industry and/or lives within a fifty mile radius of New York City, many of the shows and its stars and staff aren’t known as well to the public at large. The Oscars over the years (mostly from the 1990’s and onward), holds a tendency to recognize “art” or “independent” movies that are heavy in drama, and don’t tend to be big office office smashes. (If a summertime blockbuster becomes nominated, it tends to be for a technical award.) The Grammy only caters to those stars and recording that teeter toward a young demographic. TV programs that are set for an Emmy award focus upon television as a whole, but as less for programs appearing in one of the “big four” networks (ABC, CBS, FOX, and NBC), but toward premium a.k.a. Pay services (HBO, Showtime, etc.) as well as subscription streaming media. (Netflix, Amazon Prime, etc.)

Entertainment awards programs has been part of the TV staple for generations. The Academy Awards first saw the light on TV in 1953 on NBC. The Grammy Awards came to TV in the 1960’s. ABC first aired the Tony Awards in 1967. The Emmys, usually aired and rotated among four networks each year (Fox because the “fourth network” in the late 1980’s), first aired in the late 1940’s when TV was a new medium long before it became a standard.

As to The Golden Globe Awards. For many years, it was only aired as a local telecast within the Los Angeles area on independent station KTLA. For a while in the 1970’s, it was offered as a syndicated program for a national scale, mostly picked up by other independent stations across the USA. (This writer remembers watching this program in the early 1970‘s as a live event through WGN in Chicago, meaning that is aired from 10:00 PM to slightly past midnight, since the Central time zone was two hours ahead of the Pacific time zone.) in the middle 1990’s, it became a regular stable on NBC, around the time when celebrity news and its related factors started to catch on. Even the red carpet event before the awards show drew a bigger audience as much as the awards show itself that catered toward its viewing demographic.

Thanks to social media, these stars, mostly as seen and herd in front of the camera and mics, are always present 24/7/365. They have their own YouTube channels, host their own podcasts, have Twitter, Tic-Tok, and Instagram followers ranking into the millions, and can have their fans react to them through their own line of merchandise. So the notion of seeing them on TV through an awards show remains just another cog in their system of fans getting toward their stars, and the stars getting to their fans. If one is lucky, one can actually communicate with the stars in question, but that communication may be from a source that is working on behalf of the star in question, be it from a live person, or their robotic means.

Will this banning of NBC not airing the Golden Globes make a difference? It remains as a big maybe. After all, there are other award shows to consider. And maybe the HFPA may make an agreement to expand their team where it becomes more diverse to satisfy the network to reconsider. But in the meantime, the award shows will still continue. Live events still hold a bigger draw to video viewers. And its not limited to traditional TV. All of the media players participate in video streaming, and those that have access to an internet connected device can still watch where they may be, just as long as the WiFi connection holds out. And they can still follow their favorite stars through the media platforms as they are getting all of the attention they need just to keep up in their fame. It’s just another day in the life of a fanatic.

——————————————————————————————————————-

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2021 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

YOU CAN(‘T) GO HOME AGAIN!

Now that things and events are starting to slowly yet surly open up in terms of becoming back to a form of normal life and style, there is a relief in a number of people knowing that they can venture outside of the home they have been cooped up for a number of months knowing that they won’t be receiving and danger or threat from what’s been billed as the decease of the decade or century, depending how one desires to place this situation. However, there is a number of people that are sporting fear. Not because they will be receiving another threat in getting a virus even if they were vaccinated, but the notion that they may be getting back into a lifestyle that they placed on hold since March of last year.


That fear is in connection of realizing what kind of life they were living in before everything shut down. Once upon a time, many people would be working in some kind of office type setting. They went through the stress of getting to their job site, working for 8, 10, or 12 hours or more a day for five, six, or even seven days a week. They also had to deal with other domestic chores and duties, such a taking care of family members of all age groups, the running of household cash flows, and other notions that only spring from what’s called “real life”–the kind that may be boring, but important!


When things started to shut down, people at first became terrified in being cooped up inside of their homesteads because of an unseen and invisible enemy that was lurking outside. But something else happened. People started to realized that they were entering a life that seemed calmer and more in order. Because restaurants were closed, instead of eating out, they started to cook for themselves and liked doing it! Folks were dusting off kitchen appliances that hadn’t seen the light of day for months, even years. For some, they were allowed to work from home. Instead of going to an office space with fighting crowds on the road as well as forced to make conversations with other people that were not family or friends within their work spaces, they worked when they could. It didn’t matter if one completed a spread sheet at 2:00 PM or at 2:00 AM, just as long as it was done correctly and on time, then everything was OK. To fight off loneliness, people started to reach toward others that were within their family as relatives or those they “adapted” as their family. And because they were cooped up inside of their dwelling spaces, they started to finally get around to do the home based chores they were putting off for weeks, months, years, and even decades! They cleaned out closets, painted walls, fixed or replaced broken appliances, and did things that needed to be done at last!


To summarize it all, people realized that they could live and maintain a relaxed and stress free life. Of course, their are other factors connected to this way of new living that also focuses upon the good and not do good, such as losing one’s source of income. But in short, those out there were living a way of life that could be called “Life 2.0”.


But the questions remains. Do people really want to go back toward a rushed and overstuffed method of living? For many people, the answer is “no”! They don’t want to live their lives they way they did. They want to be with people they want to be with. They want to create means that was much better for themselves than what they had beforehand. And for businesses, they realized that having their employees work from home is less costly, meaning that there is no office space to rent, no business travel involved thanks to many (too many?) virtual meetings through Zoom, and other factors that prove that “smaller, faster, and cheaper” is the way to go.


But there are ways people can maintain the best of both worlds. From the start, one can gradually get back into a life they lived before, and the emphasis of what they are happy to become involved with, such as keeping in touch with some folks while abandoning those that are “toxic” to their well beings. If they wanted to go out to a restaurant, they could take advantage of outdoor seating since many of these places have their seating space “cafe society style” since the weather is a lot better right now than it was earlier this year. They can also attend backyard barbecues with those they know and even would like to know. (Social distancing may still be in place, but not as intense as it once was.) Please can go out to the park to walk their dogs that they got during the lockdown since adapting a pet because all of the rage where many of these pets (dogs and cats mostly, but a few other domestic critters as well), became “keepers”. And yes, one can take advantage of shopping for goods and service that they actually need in a real live store! Yes, shopping online is also part of this new normalcy, but getting back to a physical store has its moments as well!


As the headline of this article suggests if one can really “go home” again, the answer is yes! Except this new home will have a makeover. Not the type of makeover one may find in a reality TV program where the video hosts (their are usually more than one host in these type of programs), do such things as knocking down walls, replace overloaded appliances in the kitchen area, and paint the wall in colors that are not white or beige. But this kind of virtual home will be safer, stronger, and of course, much happier than ever before. People didn’t know how to keep such a life as they way they wanted. Now they have learned. Perhaps they learned in a hard way, but learned nevertheless.

Of course, this pandemic is far from over. If one didn’t get vaccinated, one should do so as soon as possible. One still has to don face masks in selected indoor places unless otherwise noted, and one must be still aware of what’s going on out there. Again, things may be returning back to where it was, but the light in the tunnel is full speed ahead!

——————————————————————————————————————-

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2021 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

ANOTHER RETRO COLUMN FROM THE ARCHIVE

As we salute ourselves in the twenty-fifth of our existence, we though we would once again dip into our archives to revise another column we had placed within these pages that perhaps you may have overlooked the first time around.

Since the tax season filing deadline has been extended this year to May 17th, we thought we would bring back an article that deals with those pesky taxes! This one was originally published back in 2013 in Vol. 18.-No. 17

THE CHECK IS IN THE E-MAIL

It appears that those that waited at the last moment to file one’s federal and state taxes are expecting to receive their refunds returned by the IRS. Now that the official tax season wrapped up on April 15th, those lucky enough to deserve a refund have already received their refunds or will be expecting to nab ‘em very shortly.

According to stats as reported by way of the IRS, some 81% of those filing a return (out of 96.6 million) are expected to receive a refund averaging $2,755. (In 2012, the average refund was $2,794). And with 89% of those returns filed electronically, the refunds will not only get there faster, but they will still do nice for those folks that would rather have the cash on hand rather than to fob them to the government.

There’s other notions to take in this episode. Some folks experience no bothers when it comes to filing taxes, as 29% reported as liking to do their taxes according to a poll taken by the Pew Research Center. 5% of those who expect a big refund stated that they love sending out those 1040 (and other) forms to the IRS. (25% who expect a small or nonexistent refund hate doing ‘’em!) But the story here is getting the share of the cash that will otherwise go toward paying federal tariffs.

During the “crunch” times where taxes were due or nearly due, many retailers, mostly on the local or regional level, were toting “tax refund” sales. Many of these outlets, usually in the form of physical stores that sell electronics (mostly big screen TV sets) or those that sell cars (a mix of new and used) have been applying in their ads that one can use that refund to use as a down payment on an auto, or to apply the same refund toward the purchase of some oversized TV machine that holds many of the bells & whistles that giant sized monitors tend to have in place.

Then again, there are the 19% of those that filed their taxes on time that will have to pay additional fees (on the worst side of the scale) or to receive nothing–the “best” scenario of the former. Those not receiving anything will not be getting their checks in the e-mail, standard mail, or any form of delivery! Since the IRS will not cut a check for the total amount of ‘zero”, one won’t expect anything to ponder upon.

On the other hand, if one has to file their tax return knowing that no money is to be owed, there will not be any penalty applied to the filer. The IRS applies a 5% penalty fee to the amount owned each month until the amount is paid in full. So if one does the math, 5% of zero equals to zero! However, one does have three years to file a “ground zero” amount. If one is lucky enough to eventually obtain a refund, the money returned may not come around for a while, if at all!. Even though it’s been a little over two weeks since those taxes were due, it’s best to send out the forms on time, but that’s not until the next tax season.

As this article is being finalized, this reporter just received word from a fellow college that he just received his refund via electronic means. The person, who we’ll call “Mr. Taxpayer” (not a very original name to use, but that’s beside the point), had just sent what appears to be an important e-mail message to yours truly announcing that his refund for filing his taxes (rather early–for the record) came to the entire sum of $38.00!

Perhaps Mr. Taxpayer is pleased to receive this amount due to the notion that he once owed a large amount of money to the IRS that came from a failed business that he was listed in the legal paperwork as a partner. To make this longer tale short, he fought with the IRS to clear his name since his partnership wasn’t what is seemed to be as listed on the legal documents.

After all of that hassle was done and cleared, his small amount is welcomed news. Now for the first time in many seasons, the IRS owed him money rather than the other way around.

So what will Mr. Taxpayer do with that amount of cash? Pay off his phone carrier for back money owned due to his cell phone usage! This usage applies to all of those broadband hungry “apps” that’s installed on his phone that he uses on a daily, and sometime hourly, basis!

In spite of this, his refund was in the e-mail as he learned that fact through his smart phone–the same phone he used to send this writer him important message!

Then again, the tax filing fun starts all over again next January 1st. So get those calculators and key strokes ready, willing, and able! The IRS will be there, ready to serve you!

——————————————————————————————————————

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2021 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

ANOTHER EMULSION SCRATCH or ANOTHER BROKEN SPLICE

In the ever present and continuing saga of the so-called “war” between how movies and television a.k.a. video content is being consumed, it seems that movies has lost another battle.

Last week, Pacific Theaters and the Arclight Theater chain that has much of its presence in the Los Angeles region, announced that they are closing their movie houses for good, thanks to the results of The Pandemic.

The closing include all of the Arclight Theaters that’s scattered around Los Angeles, including the location in Sherman Oaks, Santa Monica, and the one in Hollywood. Also closing is the Cinema Dome, an architectural landmark that used its repatriation concept based on Buckmeister (“Bucky”) Fuller’s geometric design.

Arclight was one of the profound chains of movie houses that catered to the real movie lover that offered films that were both of a mix of standard blockbusters, as well as “smaller” films that can be deemed as “independent”–a genre that took hold in the middle 1990’s and continued through the early 21st century. Its lobby consisted of a large LED tote board with the names of the movies playing in its theater rooms, with a very large clock that hung over the LED signs. This facade resembled a scene that could have been found in a train station where the names of the movies showed where the “train” was headed to, and the clock reminded when the “train” was “departing” (i.e. when the movie would start!) This design was indeed intentional as if to state that seeing a feature would take the movie viewer on a journey to a place depicted in the film, with the cast of characters as its inhabitants.

The Hollywood location served as a theater that would host red carpet-type premiers, a place where the celebrity guests would have their image taken by the gaggle of photographers and video people along a backdrop, as well as having a space to service as the after party spot. When there was no premier, the space for the after parties would be a cafe where one can order a dish of something along with a beverage (alcohol or otherwise) that would be the ideal place to discuss the movie that was just viewed.

The Cinemarama Dome was one of the many single screen theaters that existed in Los Angeles. It opened on November 7th, 1963 with the epic comedy It’s A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, World that played at that theater until January of 1965. Over time, it also screened many other films, mostly of the “epic” variety that used to play first at the more profound theaters that were in downtown regions across the USA, and later arriving at the neighborhood theaters with admissions that were described as “at popular prices”.

As of this writing, it’s not known on what will be the fate of these places. Pacific and Arclight is dabbling the idea for a buyer as Netflix recently obtained the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood.

This writer has seen many of flick at the Arclight in Hollywood, and even attended a few revival shows at the Cinerama Dome that ranged from The Scent of Mystery a.k.a Holiday In Spain (in its original “Smell-O-Vision” concept) to a (mostly) restored version of Mad World. The Arclight screenings seen there were more of the mainstream films. Some of those titles were worth worth its effort to trek to Sunset Blvd to view., while others were just a way to kill an evening’s time. Ditto for the other Arclight locations, such as the Sherman Oaks place where it was a lot closer to trek to from where the writer hangs his hat (and now works from) to see a movie that either was great to experience, amusing for what it was, or as “meh”! I even attended a few test and advance screenings of flicks there that film reviewers were not suppose to attend. But that was OK since many of the movies I did see as test films stood between the “amusing” and “meh” categories!

Although movie houses are currently open at limited capacities, many folks started getting used to seeing movies and its related content at home, whenever they desired, and at “popular prices”! Considering the notion that admission to view a feature at the Arclight Hollywood location costs an average of $14.00 per person. Concession prices varied. This didn’t count the cost of parking a vehicle be at it the garage behind the Arclight building, or at a meter space on the street–assuming you can find a place to plop the car, as well as getting to the movie house itself.

To give an example, a couple (two people) who wanted to spend a Saturday night at the movies would plunk down $28.00 for admission for both, and let’s say an additional $20.00 for concessions (popcorn, soda, etc.). Parking would cost around $10.00 in the garage. And if they wanted to have a drink in the cafe, that would be another cost. ($20.00) So with the above figures, it would cost the couple nearly $78.00. All of this just to see a feature that may have a running time of some 100 minutes–give or take!

Crunching the numbers, a Netflix subscription is around $10.00 for a month’s subscription time. Food can be anything the views(s) desire, from pizza order out, a pasta dish made at the stove, to a bowl of cold cereal poured right out of the box. Parking costs are non existent. So is the time getting there. And best of all, one doesn’t have to deal with others who may be acting obnoxious, from talking during the movie, playing with their phones, and so on. Granted, it won’t get the viewers out of the house and well as not getting the emotional appeal of experiencing the movie in a darken room with a bunch of strangers who react to what’s going on the screen. But you get what you pay for. And since this is the time where people would want to save their expenses through opportunity or necessity during these trying times, then why not?

I will admit that I am of an age where going to the movies was a big ordeal, and the only way to see such a film that TV could not duplicate was in a theater. Even when home video and pay TV entered the marketplace in the 1980’s, movies seen in a theater still made all of the difference. And over time, I would try to see just about every movie I was given the opportunity to review. Some of these movies I did see did get a review, while others were just placed aside. But as I now see it, The Pandemic because a game changer in both making movies, as well as consuming them.

Perhaps this was the virtual kick in the a$$ that the industry, as well as the consumers, needed and yet didn’t know of it! But movies, as well as TV/video has been involving since they began. This is yet another chapter in the continuing saga on why movies are made, why people go to the movies, and why video content is here to stay.

So as it’s been long stated, stay tuned…!

——————————————————————————————————————

On Sunday, April 25th, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences presented the 93rd Academy Awards, presenting the Oscar for the best films of the 2020 calendar year, held at the Dolby Theater within the Hollywood & Highland complex in Hollywood and at Union Station, downtown Los Angeles, as another “no hosted” event.

Anthony Hopkins won Best Actor for the feature release The Father. Frances McDormand won Best Actress for Nomadland. Chloe Zhao won Best Director for Nomadland, that also won as Best Picture.

For a list of all nominees and winners, visit the official web site at http://www.Oscars.com

——————————————————————————————————————

On Saturday, April 24th, the Golden Raspberry Foundation announced the “winners” for the 41th Razzie Awards, awarding the Razzie for the worst films released in the 2020 calendar year.

Mike Lindell (the “My Pillow” guy) won Worst Actor for the feature release Absolute Proof. Kate Hudson won Worst Actress for Music. Sia won Worst Director for Music, and Absolute Proof won as Worst Picture.

A special Governors Award was presented to the year 2020 for Worst Calendar Year Ever!

For a list of all nominees, visit the official Razzies web site at http://www.Razzies.com


ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2021 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

SOCIAL MEDIA AIN’T GOING AWAY!

As the pandemic still trolls onward (and upward, so we hear), we through we would give you readers some news that you already knew about, and how such news is becoming part of almost everyone’s domestic life as it’s presently known!


According to a recent report compiled by the Internet & Technology sector of the Pew Research Center, a greater part of Americans state they use the social platforms YouTube and Facebook, while the use of Instagram, Snapchat and TikTok is more comment by those under the age of thirty.


The report, entitled Social Media Use in 2021, notes that based upon the answers given by some 1,502 domestic adults over the age of eighteen from January 25th through February 8th of ’21 via cell and landline phones, 81% have visited YouTube, while 69% use Facebook. Instagram, a platform owned by Facebook, came in third at 30%, followed by Pinterest at 31%, LinkedIn (28%), Snapchat (25%), Twitter (23%), WhatsApp at 23%, TikTok (21%), Reddit (18%) and Nextdoor at 13%.


When the Pew Research Center asked this question last in 2019, the biggest jump of responses were YouTube and Reddit. All of the other platforms remained where they stood. TickTock and Nextdoor had since been added for the ’21 survey.


Many of these platforms are used for various reasons. LinkedIn is mostly used for “networking” when seeking some form of career and employment advice. Pinterest and Snapchat is where one posts pictures or images that speak upon some kind of theme, mostly from the source that is posting the images. (Many of these posts consist of one-line phrases that show off an ideal or an inspiration of some kind!) TikToc is where one can post a video image that only runs a few seconds in length. Nextdoor is a place that is a graphic “bulletin board” made for members of a specific community where if one wanted to join, the person(s) had to supply a physical mailing address that’s located in the neighborhood. Then one would receive a post card addressed to the address supplied that has a code number. Then the post card receiver would log in with the code number. This would avoid anyone outside of the “neighborhood” to be part of this group. Unless of course, that outsider knows of somebody that has an address located in the neighborhood so the post card receiver would pass the code number to that outsider. (Note, anyone not living in the neighborhood won’t be missing out on a lot, since based upon this writer’s viewing of his own neighborhood as seen on Nextdoor, much of what people report deal with complaints, feeble “warnings” of suspicious activity, or other related grudges. But we digress!)


The report contiunes to note that although Facebook lost a bit of its appeal over the last few years, it’s still one of the widely used places to go on the ‘net. This may be true since much of those that keep a place through Facebook tends to be older, while the “digital natives” (people that don’t remember when the internet and its related applications were never around), use Instagram, Snapchat and perhaps the newest kid on the block, TikTok, to get their points across!


And where does everyone else go within the social media world in terms of stage of life a.k.a. age? 65% of the under 30 crowd use Snapchat the most. Those from 30 through 49 (Millenniums and second-tier Gen Xers) cluster toward YouTube at around 93%. Those 50 through 64 (First-tier Gen Xers, the Baby Boomers, and those that Tom Browcaw calls “The Greatest Generation” (65+), flock towards Facebook at around 78% , 72%, and 50% respectfully. Since Facebook became accessible to all that didn’t have access to an e-mail address that ended with “edu”, those that are FB-ing joined as an early generation and still wish to remain, and those much older use it to keep in contact with those long lost (and now found) friends, as well as family members that include adult aged children, and those ever lovin’ grandkids–even if those grandkids tend to be hanging around somewhere else in cyberspace!


The report also breaks down usage on other platforms, such as those with a college degree are mostly on LinkedIn, and females tend to hang around Pinterest. But you readers kind of get the idea on what this writer is pushing.


Since this pandemic began a little over a year ago, social media was one of the top source that people used to get over with what was (and is) going on! One report noted through this writer stated that social media, along with other internet related sources such as online shopping and viewing streaming video contact, kept those people content, including people keeping themselves in check i.e. not going off their gourds!


Interestingly enough, all of those sources listed above were tied when it came to usage for sanity. And if anyone wanted to know what came in at first and last place? “Real” contact with family and friends in first place, and mental therapy and consuming alcohol came in last! So the myths that more people turned toward booze while being locked down isn’t as true as one would suspect!

But until the pandemic is totally over–which may not be for a while if at all, social media ain’t gonna take any vacations! Perhaps others will soon enough. After all, how is anyone going to post those pictures and video of their trips to Hullagaland without the sources to do so? If one is going to brag about the places they have seen and the things they did, they would use their social media outlets. Otherwise, what’s the point of taking a vacation in the first place?

——————————————————————————————————————-

THE GHOSTS OF MARY LINCOLN, Tom Dugan’s solo show about the final and nearly forgotten times of the widow of one of America’s most beloved presidents, performs for a limited series of shows within a socially distanced and inmate outdoor stage place located within the Woodland Hills-San Fernando Valley region.


The show’s setting is Mary Lincoln’s sister’s attic space in a home located in Springfield, Illinois. It’s the early 1880’s, nearly twenty years after the 16th President of the United State fell to an assassin’s bullet. Mary, now at the elderly age of 63, is nearly alone. She begin to tell her story in front of a few journalists present from some of the leading newspapers. She emotes her way through what’s left of her life. She speaks about how she met the tall young gentleman that was born in a log cabin, self educated himself, and later because her husband. She verbalizes about her three sons, two of the three dying at a young age. Mary also tells tales that were about the president-to-be, the people she knew both in and out of Washington, and the notion that after she left the title of “First Lady”, she had to face her own personal demons. Some of these episodes she emotes upon were true, and some she believes were true. And is she actually speaking to a group of reporters that gathered in this attic space, or are they another series of ghosts that remain to haunt Mary’s own being?


This single act play, written, produced, and performed by the playwright with stage direction by Shelby Sykes, puts in the real picture about Mary Lincoln, a woman that was part of history yet suffered rather silently about her own mental condition. The content is historical in content, yet some of the antidotes spoken may be for real with a bit of creative license added; Mary’s part of the license rather than the playwrights!


Tom Dugan as Mary appears on stage (actually, the side patio pool area of Tom’s personal homestead) while donning a black frumpy outfit yet doesn’t appear “in drag” as Mary. He doesn’t sport a widow’s wig, and speaks in an older lady’s voice–deep in tone with a no nonsense sense of mood. (Since there was no way to know how Mary sounded like, Tome’s interpretation may be actually near the truth!) It was known that Mary was indeed petite in size and frame, far from Tom’s physical stance. However, with the way that Tom portrayed this woman living in a lowly attic trying to escape the aftermath of her husband’s death and her emotionally ill mind, one will become more absorbed with the story of Mary and the way it was told and presented. (Larger size of the actor be damned!)


The set design and construction by Chris & Becky Peterson consists of a number of old trunks, discarded furniture, and various containers scattered about along with some candles to provide attic lighting. Polly Gregry’s consuming is just a black outfit that widows would ware to morn their deceased husband–the type of outfit they would wear for the rest of their lives! But this was how it was done back in the 1880’s when widows were widows until they themselves died. And with the way that the playwright paints this rather tragic tale of Mary on stage, it’s very fitting for this widow to be a widow!

Abe Lincoln is one of America’s best known and most esteemed presidents in history. His likeness is still seen to this very day as a profile on a five dollar bill and as an appearance on Illinois license plates. But Mary Lincoln herself faded from view. This play is a tribute to a person that indeed stood by her man, even if that man was inches taller, and was able to lead a nation that went through a domestic war, financial “panics”, and always giving a sense of courage and hope to its citizens. It’s rather sobering that Mary’s brightest time was when she lived in the White House, rather than in a dingy attic loft somewhere in Springfield.

THE GHOSTS OF MARY LINCOLN, perform at “Dugan’s (Outdoor) Backyard Playhouse” In Woodland Hills until May 1st. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM. Reservations are taken by contacting dbptickets@gmail.com. Those placing a reservation will be given the address to the theatre space.

In addition, Tom Dugan’s other play, TELL HIM IT’S JACKIE, about another Presidential widow, Jackie Kennedy and stars Kait Haire as the titled character, makes a return appearance on Friday and Saturday evenings at 8:00 PM from May 7th through the 29th at the same outdoor location. (See review-Vol. 25-No. 41) Reservations for that program can also be made through the same email address.

It will be advised that face masks will still be required to be worn by all attending patrons during all performances, unless regional and community standards dictate otherwise.

—————————————————————————————————————————

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2021 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!