NOTHING’S ON!

As the so-called holiday season chugs onward, there’s nothing like watching something one would want on the old television set. Not so much as tuning in on a phone, a laptop, or through a electronic pad, but on a genuine video screen that resembles a TV set.

Thanks to all of the choices one has at their disposal, one would believe that with all of those choices, there would be something worth viewing. And thanks to those so-called “over the top” sources that are not found through broadcast, satellite, or coax cable, but through streaming, those viewers would be pleased in what they can find…right?

Well, according to a research study compiled by PwC (the accounting firm formerly known as PriceWaterhouseCoopers), almost two-thirds in their survey noted that TV viewers find it a “struggle” to discover something to watch. Some 62% of those polled stated that they can’t find something to look at after their timely search to find a program worth watching (with the search time running about a couple of minutes), 20% default to rewatching something they have already seen!

This factor isn’t much of a surprise to a generation of viewers that are getting used to the idea that one can consume their longer-form video information on any electronic device that can connect to an internet based source that sports a video screen. (Longer -form video in this case, is programming with a running time of ten minutes and up.) Depending on one’s age demographics, this is the method that video, not necessarily “television” but resembles this form of media, is to be used and recognized. The younger one from “Gen Z” (age 21 and less), to Millenniums (21-35) find this way to watch TV as the norm. These groups even find their choice or programming to consume influenced by people that they know. The PwC study finds that 51% noted that they watch a specific program based on what their family and friends state. It’s assumed that these family and friends are the people they know for real, rather than through “friends” only found through social media circles. However, a quarter of those polled (25%) noted that they watch a title so they won’t fall into the trap of being left out in discussions toward a program selection. (This term is better known as FOMO!)

During this current calendar season, although it may be called “the most wonderful time of the year” as a classic seasonal song notes within its lyrics, it can be the most hectic! With all of the shopping to do both in-store and online, as well as the cooking and baking (done inside of a real kitchen, no doubt) to all of the festive merry making that is part of the seasonal antics, one may not have the time to view video content. But they do! Thanks to the for noted phone devices, it’s a lot easier to take advantage of one’s favorite (or perhaps not-so-favorite) program while shopping in a physical store, creating editable goodies, or even attending a “holiday” based get-together. After all, if one is attending a party of some kind and they don’t care so much of what’s going on, one can just whip out the ever lovin’ smartphone, and you are good to go! This way to self distract one’s self may drop a subtle hint to the party giver that maybe the bash isn’t as great as one may believe! But this is besides the point!

But there is the reliable TV device that is bigger (as much as 7” across in screen size), hooked up to a booming sound system, (enough to blow out the windows of the place is one is so inclined), as well as a comfy place to plop one’s rear on! And with all of the choices to take a look at, there is plenty for everyone! So what’s the real beef?

As the new year is just around the corner, there will be more to watch, and more to complain about! Television is now experiencing its next big phase, perhaps the biggest change since color pictures replaced the old monochrome signals. (That’s “black & white” to those not in the know!) But as things do progress, so does television and its related aspects! And when more these changes, more will stay the same with the classic cries and gripes to recall with a zillion sources to pick through, there is still nothing worth peeking at! And this does not count going through the many remakes/reboots/reemerges of TV shows that originated from another generation. That’s a whole different issue as that stands, and more choices to ponder upon! So much for something really different!
———————————————————————————————————————
NEWS AND REVIEWS

HOLIDAY DILEMMAS, a collection of four short plays that takes place around the Holiday season, performs at Studio C theater in Hollywood for a limited run.

The first place entitled No Expectations, written by Michael Lamb and directed by C. Jay Cox stars Kurt Koehler and Kate Robertson about a man who performs drag shows receiving a visit from a daughter he never knew he had. The second play, Physical Beauty & Other Abnormalities, written by James Edward Quinn and directed by Christopher Comeau, features Calvin Picon and Manuel Soro that tells about a man with a physical deformity on his face and a visit from a “professional” man to perform an intimate “service”. The third piece, Mikey, written by Jackson Courtney and directed by C. Jay Cox, speaks about a young man back from military service who visits his parents at home as mom is surprised to see her son while dad is mentally out of touch. Mikey stars Nicole Stanton, Michael Edelstein, and Jordan Santoro. The final play, Margerie (Siclam) features Trisha Stahl and Brandon Nagle as a noted serial killer who visits the home of his next victim, an overly obese woman, only to get his intentions become a bit complicated.

This quartet of plays runs the gambit between comedy and somberness with a pinch of charm along with a touch of bittersweetness. The comic elements portrayed are of the quirky type. When it becomes dramatic, it does so with true emotion. One can feel how the season to be merry and bright can become anything but through default!

Granted, there a number of holiday based productions floating around town to experience. Some are of the musical variety, while others can yet be another re-re-re-telling of Charlie Dickens’ greatest hit! But for those that desire a seasonal alternative, this collection of short plays will all do the trick! And with a eighty minute running time (give or take), one will have plenty of time to extend the holiday cheer after the show by heading off to one’s favorite watering hole for a tom and jerry or a cold glass of high powered egg nog! After all, that is what the season is really all about–taking responsibility of course!

HOLIDAY DILEMMAS, presented by Studio C Artists and Combined Artform, performs at Studio C, 6448 Santa Monica Blvd. (between Wilcox and Cole Avenues), Hollywood, until December 16th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM., with an additional performance on Thursday, December 14th at 8:00 PM. For ticket reservations, call (800) 838-3006, or via online at
https://holidaydilemmas.brownpapertickets.com/

Visit Studio C Artists at http://www.StudioCArtists.com and Combined Artform at http://www.CombinedArtform.com
——————————————————————————————————————–
ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com
#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

Advertisements

“HOLIDAY” ANTICS

It’s no surprise that the ever loving ”holiday” season is going in full tilt, a movement that’s actually been into effect since late Halloween!

By now, just about any ad found on all forms of existing media has been tying themselves to this season that consists of many holidays from Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, and other events that fall within the month of December that emphasis celebrations, gift giving, and related festivities. It’s also the time where everything goes into a complete dizzy for many, an aspect that is welcomed by some and dreaded by others.

There are the ones that welcome the events of the month. They are the folks that are involved in getting gifts, giving gifts, creating dishes that make the season just what it is, throwing parties, attending parties and well, you the the idea!

The people that dread the season are the ones that feel that they are obligated to create the goodies, host the gatherings, and so on. Such stress isn’t as new as one suspects. It’s been around in domestic society for generations. The only reason why it appears to be more precise is the fact that the word on such stress is much easier to pass around, especially to those that are outside of people’s circles. Social media is nearly plastered with notices on how the season is just as great and wonderful as how it’s a total wreck!

Perhaps why such times are within this state is the oft given fact that the season is suppose to be as perfect as a Christmas cookie or a Hanukkah latke! Much of the media usually painted a picture where everyone is depicted as happy with everything that goes around. If one turned toward television over the years, many of these TV programs, some remembered while other long forgotten, didn’t portray stress or other form of strife, or not within anything that would qualify as such as depicted is so-called “real life”.

However, that was at a time where if anyone was encountering such stress, it was usually kept to themselves. Many folks did make attempts to overdo the season by attempting to show some form of happiness when in reality, they were not! It was rather taboo to show some from of non-contentness, especially during the Christmas, et. al season. Again, the only way to see what the season was all about was through media, mostly in the form of television.

But television as a whole was considered escapism that showcased a fantasy world that was believable in some ways and means. It was a world where people spoke in witty terms, held some kind of knowledge that one’s “next door neighbor” didn’t necessarily possess, and in many ways, had their situations solved by the time the end credits rolled.

But this writer doesn’t want to emphasis how “bad” the season is. Yes, there seems to be a lot going on, and there are lots to do and witness. However, these moments are indeed for the moment. Once January hits, everything will come back to its so-called normal and perhaps relaxed state.

The best and perhaps only way to deal with all of this fal-de-ral is to use the advice that is simple and to the point. It’s the Christmas/Hanukkah/Kwanzaa/Winter Solstice season—Get over it!
———————————————————————————————————————
NEWS AND REVIEWS

THE SHAPE OF WATER (Fox Searchlight) takes place in an alternative period that resembles 1962. Elisa Esposito (Sally Hawkins) is a mute woman that lives in a rather large yet dreary apartment that sits above a movie theatre. Her neighbor Giles (Richard Jenkins) is a graphic artist that lives in the same type of unit as Elisa dwells–big in size but just as old and rickety. Elisa works as a cleaning woman in a government based research center that works on top-secret projects. Elisa’s friend at work is Zelda Fuller (Octavia Spencer), another cleaning lady for the company. All three of these characters hold a common bond: they all sport a sense of isolation. Giles lives with a number of cats, and can’t seem to get any of his commercial artwork sold. Zelda is married, but is a “negro” woman that faces the challenges of working in a white man’s world. Elisa lives alone, and can’t speak due to her being raised in an orphanage and had her speaking abilities altered as a young child. Her life changes drastically when she discovers by accident, the company’s top-secret project. They had found a “gil-man” that came from a remote location near the Amazon that can be used to live in the ocean to perhaps spy on the Russians. But there is something that fascinates Elisa to this gil-man. This fascination gets to the attention of Richard Strickland (Michael Shannon) who is in charge of the top-secret project. He wants to keep this project within his control, far from the Russians who might just have a spy disguised as a company scientist working within the place-Dr. Robert Hoffstetler (Michael Stuhlbarg). What is appealing to Elisa of this gil-man? What are the real plans for the government to employ this beast from the underwater? What do the Russians want from this creature? And will Giles find the true happiness he seeks from his own life?

This movie, written (with Vanessa Taylor) and directed by Guillermo Del Toro, is a feature that takes upon many shapes. First, it’s a period film that takes place in a time that resembles a stereotypical 1962, where modernism was everywhere, fashions of the time were all the rage, yet men were superior, woman worked “woman’s jobs”, and heaven help you if you were not white! Although the times were real, those times as presented in the film were not. That what makes this movie a vehicle that holds comic potential, but isn’t a “comedy” in the traditional sense. In fact, sometimes the movie viewer wants to laugh, but doesn’t quite know what to laugh at! It’s also eye candy too! There are plenty to visuals to look at from vintage furnishings, cars of the period, as well as snippets of old movies from the 20th Century Fox film library. (Those clips are seen on Giles’ TV set, as well as the films playing at the movie house Elisa and Giles lives above!) Nigel Churcher’s art direction along with Shane Vieau and Jeff Melvin’s set decorations keep the period it represents well alive within its own perspective.

As far as the elements that give the reasons to see this movie as entertainment value, they do exist. However, because of the basic scope that this title holds, it may not be for all tastes as it leans toward a surrealist viewpoint. Although superhero movies do the same thing, those epics are created for other reasons as those same titles are for a mass audience. This movie is more toward older adults that watch movies for not over the top visuals, but for story and character. This is same kind of demographic that participate in voting for industry based awards usually presented at the beginning of the calendar year for films usually released after November 1st. And this title fits right in to those guidelines!

As hinted, THE SHAPE OF WATER isn’t for everybody. Then again, so are those superhero movies! But those make money because everyone wants to see ‘em in a theatre. This movie may do well on the small(er) screen!
PS..Doug Jones plays the gil-man (billed as “Amphibian Man” in the end credits) that resembles the Creature From the Black Lagoon. This time, using better special effects!

This movie is rated “R” for violence, cussing, and nudity. Now playing in selected theaters.
———————————————————————————————————————
The Angel City Chorale held their annual Holiday seasoned concert over the previous weekend (December 2nd-3rd) entitled A New Home for the Holidays, taking place at their new home, the Immanuel Presbyterian Church, located in the Koreatown section of Los Angeles.

Sue Fink, lead conductor for the ACC, proceeded to musically usher a group of both male and female voices, backed by an intimate full orchestra to present a selection of musical numbers that rang true to the festive season.

The selection performed consisted of a blend of traditional songs (Gloria in Excelsis, O Holy Night, etc.) contemporary numbers, (Do You Here What I Hear?, a melody of Winter Wonderland and Let It Snow) as well as a original piece entitled Hanukkah Lullaby, composed by Sue Fink and Denny Wynbrandt as arranged by Sue Fink and orchestrated by Nita Sinaga. The concert audience also had an opportunity to participate in a few sing-a-longs. Although the songs selected to sing-a-long to were more of the familiar type, the lyrics were provided within the pages of the concert program.

Perhaps the must unique aspect of this concert was its new physical location. The Immanuel Presbyterian Church is one of those massive cathedral-esque churches that were built in the first half of the 20th century (Immanuel Church was completed in 1929) that were grand lavish places a church could be within an urban setting. Not only a facility such as this gives the concert a sense of spirituality, but also provides near perfect acoustics as churches from this era did not utilized electronic sound systems. Compared to ACC’s previous location (another church facility located farther west on Wilshire Blvd.), this new place offers a bigger capacity, better seating, and more parking space!

ACC’s next concert will take place on June 2nd and 3rd of ’18, entitled One World Many Voices II that celebrates global diversity through music. More details on that event will be posted through ACC’s website and social media outlets found online at https://angelcitychorale.org, via Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AngelCityChorale, YouTube www.youtube.com/user/AngelCityChorale, Twitter https://twitter.com/AngelCityChoral and SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/angelcitychorale
———————————————————————————————————————
ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com
#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

SHOPPING DONE(?)(!)

The date of this edition is the Monday after the Thanksgiving weekend. For many years, this day was designated as “Cyber Monday”, the day where folks would head online to shop for their goods as part of the “holiday” shopping season. (The term “holiday” in this case referrers to all of the festive events taking place in December where gifts are normally exchanged as part of the said festivities!) This Monday after the day o’ thanks caused a big upstart to traffic on sites that sell goods online, since this was the day where folks would return back to their workspaces, and would take advantage of having access to a ‘net connection.

“Cyber Monday” became an offshoot to “Black Friday”, the day after Thanksgiving where folks to rush over to the local retail outlets to take advantage of deals set by the retailers just to get them into the stores. These items up for sale usually consisted of electronics, toys, and related goods that is normally considered as a “gift”, or some item that are well in demand.

Physical stores tried to plan strategies to get people into the stores far from their competition would by opening on Thanksgiving evening. Then opening times moved to the afternoon hours. Then their sale deals would begin the Sunday before. Before long, the deals would begin into early November where people would no longer rush into the outlets on a 6:00 AM opening time in order to grab the goods!

Then the cyber outlets got into the game, posting deals and values through their shopping portals. Before long, online retailers such as Walmart, Target, and perhaps the biggest one of ‘em all, Amazon, offered many incentives for folks to shop online, from free shipping, second day delivery, free wrapping, and so on! These incentives made “Cyber Monday” the day that lost much of its luster, the same notion that “Black Friday” took over the recent seasons.

Of course, people have learned that bargains on nearly anything that can be purchased and considered as a gift would become available all year round, not necessarily connected to the holiday shopping season. In this case, that “holiday” would be for any holiday, not just for Christmas, etc. Thus, the practice of shopping year round would take to heart.

This method of shopping every day of the year for a specific time or event is nothing new. A person this writer knows of got this idea from a long forgotten article that appeared in one of those domestic lifestyle magazines that cater to a female demographic. (Good Housekeeping, Woman’s Day, etc.) The article stated that one can build a “gift box”, where one could purchase items throughout the year, and to place items inside of a box or container of some sort. These items would serve as “stand by” products where one can use as a last minute gift just in case a festive day comes around, usually at a last moment’s notice. (Birthday, anniversary, etc.) One would simply reach into the gift box, and have an item ready to give to the person for their birthday, et. al.

Things have changed drastically since that gift box idea came across the pages of those homestead magazines. However, the idea is the same. So as the shopping season is in full force, don’t become too surprised if that gift one is going to receive for the holidays was purchased months before–unless it’s a gift that holds minimal thought behind it, such as the ever lovin’ chess and sausage packs that tend to come around in the month of December. This writer even knew of one person who obtained a number of these gift packages after December 25th as a post-Christmas sale. This person then wrapped each package in plastic wrap and placed each item in a deep freezer and kept then for nearly a year. Then the person carefully thawed each package in early December to eventually give to the folks on their shopping list. This person did this for a number of years, and from what’s known, nobody ever suspected! Then again, did anyone really care?
———————————————————————————————————————
NEWS AND REVIEWS

COCO (Disney/Pixar) takes place in the village of Santa Cecilia, located somewhere in Mexico. Miguel (Voiced by Anthony Gonalez) is a twelve year old boy that lives with his family than runs a small shoe making business. Many years ago, Miguel’s great-great grandfather who was a musician on the guitar, abandon the family to set out to make his music. Since that time, the notion of music was forbidden within the family as set by his great-great grandmother who started the family business. Miguel’s idol is the legendary guitar player, Ernesto de la Cruz (Benjamin Bratt) who made a name of himself in performing ballads, making records, and appearing in musical melodramas in the 1940’s. Miguel desires to become a guitar balladeer as his idol once was. However, his family refuses the young lad to even touch a guitar, being self cursed by the notion of music, thanks to having the great-great grandfather leave the family in the name of making music! Now it’s the Día de los Muertos-Day of the Dead, the period that takes place in early November paying tribute to those that have since departed. During this time, Miguel visits Ernesto’s tomb in the village cemetery where his guitar is kept. As he enters the tomb to fetch the guitar, he is transferred to a spirit world, a mystical and rather urbanized Land of the Dead, where he has the chance to meet Ernesto. However, he encounters Hector (Gael Cargia Bernal) a bumbling one-time guitar player who might just be a long forgotten missing link in Miguel’s family.

This latest release from Pixar (its second this calendar year and its 19th in total) is extremely charming, amusing, and as the basic plot suggests, very family oriented. There is plenty to take part of as seen within this feature from its concept design by Nat McLaughlin and Daniel Arriaga, to an original ballad entitled “Remember Me” (composed by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez) that plays out as another basic theme that this feature mentions–to be remembered! Adrian Molina and Matthew Aldrich’s screenplay from a story by Lee Unkrich, Jason Katz, Adrian Molina, & Matthew Aldrich will charm the kids as well as the adults. This all ages element makes animated films as this one very appealing to all that view it, no matter what stage of life one is in. Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina directs this film with the same aspects as to all of the Pixar animated titles with limited (if any) pop culture references used. Unlike other animated films of late, this form of absence gives animated movies as this one more enrichment without putting out for cheap laughs!

Most of the voice cast that is featured is of hispanic decent with the exception of John Ratzenberger. He has been cast as a voice artist in every feature film created by Pixar since Toy Story was first released in 1995. This same cast that also includes (among others) Cheech Martin and Edward James Olmos, also provides the same voices for its Spanish language versions that play in nations that, well, speak Spanish!

This title is ideal to be released around the Thanksgiving holiday as the notion to this film is based upon family and the values it holds–or should hold anyway! It falls within similar realms as to Pixar’s 2015 Thanksgiving release, The Good Dinosaur. (See review-Vol. 20, No. 48).

How is this film different that Pixar’s previous release Cars 3?
(See review-Vol. 22, No. 25). Cars 3 has better merchandise license appeal! As to COCO? Let the folks at The Walt Disney Company figure that one out, unless they have enough to deal with through their Marvel comic book super-heroes and Star Wars universes!

This feature is rated “PG” for thematic elements. Available in both 2-D and 3-D versions. Now playing in multiplexes nationwide.
———————————————————————————————————————
The Angel City Chorale will present A NEW Home for the Holidays, a festive concert event that spotlights the season with some classic harmonious tuneful chorale arrangements, as well as some new musical works including a world premier.

Among the musical numbers that are timeless for the season including new creative renditions of recognized carols as Bring A Torch, O Holy Night, among many others, as well as time honored arrangements as classical composers as Joseph Haydn to contemporary favorites from Norwegian songwriter Ola Gjello and Grammy Award-winning melodist Eric Whitacre, a new work will be presented: “Hanukkah Lullaby”, an original piece composed by ACC Founder and Artistic Director Sue Fink and ACC choir member and songwriter Denny Wynbrandt. Fink will once again lead the chorale as she has done since its founding. 2018 will commemorate this group’s Silver Anniversary of providing a musical blend of classical, jazz, folk, gospel, urban, rhythm & blues, and all points in between, to audiences around the nation and across the globe.

And with ACC tradition, there will be sing-a-long sessions presented where the theater audience can “join” the 160+ singers accommodated with a full piece orchestra to use their vocal talents as part of the festivities. It’s the ideal concert for all ages to gather to observe and glorify a timeless season of joy, piece, and the celebration of the human spirit.

As far as this year’s concert theme, A NEW Home for the Holidays. This year’s event, ACC’s 24th Annual holiday concert, will take place at a new location, the Immanuel Presbyterian Church, 3300 Wilshire Blvd. (between South Vermont Avenue and Normandie Avenue), in the Koreatown district of Los Angeles, a place that is larger in capacity and offers more parking space!

A NEW Home for the Holidays will take place for two days only, Saturday, December 2nd, and Sunday, December 3rd at 7:00 PM both evenings.

For more information on this event including ticketing details, call (310) 943-9231, or via online at  https://angelcitychorale.org/concerts-events/a-new-home.

Visit ACC through their social media outlets via Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AngelCityChorale, YouTube http://www.youtube.com/user/AngelCityChorale, Twitter https://twitter.com/AngelCityChoral and SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/angelcitychorale

(Note: This notice also appeared in Vol. 23-No. 47-Eds.)
———————————————————————————————————————
ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com
#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

GIVING THANKS AND “THANX”

This week kicks off the final six weeks of the calendar year where things move in a very rapid pace. It’s the start of what’s been stated as the big holiday season with many festive events, both as official and unofficial. There’s Thanksgiving (in the USA anyway) on November 23rd. In December, one will experience Christmas Day (December 25th), Hanukkah (December 12th-20th), Kwanzaa (December 26th-January 1st) as well as other holidays that tend to fall within the month of December.

For simplicity sake, this article will concentrate on Thanksgiving, the day that one is support to give thanks for the various elements that exist in one’s domain. This is the moment that is perhaps the biggest day that revolves around food–the day where folks gather around a table of some sort and have themselves the biggest feast day this side of the eating circles.

Just about every magazine that caters to housekeeping and/or homemaking in their November issues has articles on Thanksgiving, offering ideas one can add to and for their gathering. Travel see see big movements about as folks head off between one place to another for the long four day plus weekend. Families will reunite for the day that can range from peaceful to the stressful moments (sometimes leading into actual fights) that has been part of sitcom fodder as well as the occasional feature film plot points (Trains, Planes, and Automobiles, Home For The Holidays, The Ice House, etc.) that one can catch on a favorite streaming media service.

Of course, there are the thankfulness parts, the time where one can take out the moment to give thanks. Generally speaking, there are two sets of thankfulness to make note of. There is the traditional thanks, and there are the “thanx”. This humble writer will separate the two emotions, giving an honest opinion over the methods of thankfulness.

Fist, there is the genuine thanks. This is where one counts their blessings that they hold over the elements that are found within their personal domain. Many people have such elements that they are grateful to have and hold for what they are and how they are conceived. If ranges wildly, from having a home to live in, family and/or friends they cherish, a job or occupation they are content with, and the list goes onward. Taking time to give thanks at first may sound old fashioned and perhaps even corny. However, with many of the tragic events that has taking place within the last few weeks as created by mother nature as well as human nature, one does take out the time to note various elements that state “This could have happened to me!”. Social media expressed all types of commentary of these notions, meaning that in spite of what occurred as well as its origins, people hold a strong notion to rally around one another and offer such thanks, no matter how large or how small.

Then there is the “thanx” part, the methods that fall into a trivial state of being. As one can guess, Thanksgiving starts out the biggest shopping season of the year. Retailers have been ramping up inventory over goods that is most likely to be exchanged during these final six weeks of the calendar year. It stated out as the days called “Black Friday”, leading off to “Cyber Monday” eventually changing to an ever present occasion.

These shoppers give their thanks (or “thanx”) over the fact they they can now shop for the holidays (all of ‘em) through convenience, taking advantage of buying online. According to a recent report by the marketing firm Deloitte of those polled in their 32nd annual holiday survey as completed online based on a sample of 5,000 adults, 51% will do their holiday shopping online, the first time where buying via cyberspace will surpass shopping at a physical retail outlet. This means that people will not even bother in trekking out to a mall or big box outlet to fight crowds, deal with sales folks that can range from helpful to clueless, and face the hassle of getting what they want or need. All it will take is a click of the mouse and a handy-dandy credit card number! That aspect, along with the 90 million Amazon Prime members as estimated by the Consumer Intelligence Research Partners, shopping is a snap–or click!

Whatever the case, there is that thankfulness in the air, from knowing that one is safe and secure from harm and danger, to the satisfaction that one scored on getting Uncle Louie a copper plated chamber pot (monogramed) through an internet based store that includes shipping and handling in the price! However, one should give their personal thanks to whatever and wherever one may be. And this thankfulness isn’t just limited to the fourth Thursday in November. It should be a year round aspect, the same case for shopping for the season! After all, monogramed copper plated chamber pots can be obtained all year round. Then again, would Uncle Louie know, let alone care just when you got the thing? We didn’t think so, either!
———————————————————————————————————————
NEWS AND REVIEWS

SHERLOCK HOMES AND THE CASE OF THE JERSEY LILY, Katie Forgette’s play that has the master detective taking upon a case between an actress of the stage, a series of scandalous letters, and an arch villain within an ordeal that can bring a fall within the British monarchy, opens as its third production of Theatre 40’s current theater season.

Melissa Collins portrays Lillie Langtry, an actress known as the “Jersey Lily”, that has graced the high stages of London and much of Europe. A few years before, she composed and mailed a series of private and rather intimate letters to the Prince of Wales, and those letters were recently stolen! A mysterious source notified Lillie that these letters, along with a photographic image, would be sent to the newspapers unless a ransom is paid to get those letter back into her hands! The content of what these letters expressed would not only cause havoc within the ruling royal family, but to Lillie’s personal repatriation. So Lillie turns for the support of Sherlock Homes (Martin Thompson) and his faithful assistant Dr. Watson (John Wallace Combs) to solve this case. Lillie has in tow playwright Oscar Wilde (Scott Facher) who is currently writing a new comedy about the importance of being forthright that wants Lillie to star in. It’s discovered that behind this blackmail sect is Homes’ arch enemy, Professor Moriarty (Dave Buzzotta) that desires to bring the detective down for his count as well as for the British empire. Homes and company meets another challenge to stop Moriarty in his tracks, and to see to it that Lillie’s name and repatriation is kept in a proper manner.

This is a play that comes from the realms of one of literature’s best known and well respected case solvers, and presents all of the action, thrills, and suspense one would expect into an original stage concept from the aspects of the mastermind detective as created by Arthur Conan Doyle. In this Theatre 40 program, Martin Thompson depicts a Sherlock Homes as one would desire: a character that stands up mighty with the texture of stone, yet holds enough wit and intelligence based on simple (or “elementary”) logic. Melissa Collins as Lillie Langtry is a thespian of the stage that is just as pure as a lilly, even though she is more legacy that virgin. John Wallance Combs as Dr. Watson is fully acquainted of what Homes can provide, yet stands out for his own self. Oscar Wilde, as portrayed by Scott Facher, provides much of the comedy relief depicting a playwright that would rather pen witty stage pieces that serious dramatic matter. And Dave Buzzotta as Professor Moriaty holds the sinister approach, ready, willing, and nearly able to foil Homes, only to keep another chance in almost succeeding at bay. Jules Aaron directs this program that will keep the audience’s attention throughout, always keeping on the know to how Homes will get his job done, using reason that anyone could figure out if one knew how!

The stage set as created by Theatre 40’s residual set designer Jeff G. Rack changes from one selected scene to the next that enhances the period of Victorian London where Homes and company is evoked at its superior state of excellence.

Also featured as supporting players are Alison Blanchard, Shawn Savage, and Anibal Silveyra.

For those that are fans of Sherlock Homes detective tales, or those that enjoy a great thriller for a play, SHERLOCK HOMES AND THE CASE OF THE JERSEY LILY will fit that bill! As one of the play’s running lines note, “You see, but you do not observe.” There is plenty to see, yet much more to observe. That is what theatre is really all about! (No s#it Sherlock!!)

SHERLOCK HOMES AND THE CASE OF THE JERSEY LILY, presented by Theatre 40 and performs at the Reuben Cordova Theatre, located within the campus of Beverly Hills High School, 241 South Moreno Drive (off little Santa Monica Blvd.) Beverly Hills, until December 17th. Showtimes are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM. Special Monday night performances take place on December 4th and 11th at 8:00 PM. No performances on November 23rd and 24th.
For ticket reservations or for more information, call (310) 364-0535, or via online at http://www.Theatre40.org

———————————————————————————————————————
Over at Zombie Joe’s Underground Theatre Group performance space located in North Hollywood is Susan Chambers’ UNCOVER THE MOON, a surrealistic tale of a young woman’s coming of age saga that carries her toward magical elements.

Mieko Beyer is Levana. As a girl, she lives within a community of sorts that has a sense of anxiety within its grip. Her being becomes earmarked with the burden of womanhood through a “Mad Woman”. She enters an invisible presence of the spirit of the moon as she shakes off her curse to discover her own place found within her domain.

This one-act production written and directed by Susan Chambers, is performed in a non-linear pattern that resembles an experimental theatre piece. There are no backdrops to speak of (the show is literally performed within a “black box” space) as the production itself has no set timeline nor physical space where the events in this play take place. This stage piece consists of a bevy of performers that emote through costuming and with some facial masks donned. (Lucine Chukhadarian and Denise Devin provides the said costume design.) The supporting cast appearing includes (as listed in their alphabetical order), Laura Lee Botsacos, Garrett Botts, Scathach Ashley Cotter, Philip Sokoloff, and Shalonda Shaw Reese. This ensemble troupe emotes their dialogue that becomes part of Levena’s inter-domain as she uncovers her place within her universe.

This is a production that is very creative, yet needs an acquired taste to become appreciated for what it is. Granted, it may not necessarily be for everyone that isn’t acquainted to new alternative theatre. But for those that value and admire this form of stage expressionism, then this presentation works to one’s personal advantage. It’s well worth its viewing as presented.

UNCOVER THE MOON will make its final performance on Saturday November 25th at the ZJU Theatre Group, 4850 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood, one-quarter block north of the intersection of Lankershim Blvd., Vineland Avenue, and Camarillo Street. Showtime is 8:30 PM. For ticket reservations, call (818) 202-4120, or via online at http://ZombieJoes.tix.com

The next performances as presented by the Zombie Joe Underground Theatre Group will be Blood Alley Christmas, described as a “festively-abrasive holiday-horror yuletide spectacular”, and Astroglyde 2017, calling itself a “stellar holiday evening of truth, terror & titillation”. Blood Alley Christmas runs on Friday and Saturday nights, December 1st through the 16th at 11:00 PM, and Astroglyde 2017 performs on Sunday evenings December 3rd, 10th, and 17th at 7:00 PM.

Visit http://www.ZombieJoes.com or http://www.UrbanDeath.com for further information.
———————————————————————————————————————
The Angel City Chorale will present A NEW Home for the Holidays, a festive concert event that spotlights the season with some classic harmonious tuneful chorale arrangements, as well as some new musical works including a world premier.

Among the musical numbers that are timeless for the season including new creative renditions of recognized carols as Bring A Torch, O Holy Night, among many others, as well as time honored arrangements as classical composers as Joseph Haydn to contemporary favorites from Norwegian songwriter Ola Gjello and Grammy Award-winning melodist Eric Whitacre, a new work will be presented: “Hanukkah Lullaby”, an original piece composed by ACC Founder and Artistic Director Sue Fink and ACC choir member and songwriter Denny Wynbrandt. Fink will once again lead the chorale as she has done since its founding. 2018 will commemorate this group’s Silver Anniversary of providing a musical blend of classical, jazz, folk, gospel, urban, rhythm & blues, and all points in between, to audiences around the nation and across the globe.

And with ACC tradition, there will be sing-a-long sessions presented where the theater audience can “join” the 160+ singers accommodated with a full piece orchestra to use their vocal talents as part of the festivities. It’s the ideal concert for all ages to gather to observe and glorify a timeless season of joy, piece, and the celebration of the human spirit.

As far as this year’s concert theme, A NEW Home for the Holidays. This year’s event, ACC’s 24th Annual holiday concert, will take place at a new location, the Immanuel Presbyterian Church, 3300 Wilshire Blvd. (between South Vermont Avenue and Normandie Avenue), in the Koreatown district of Los Angeles, a place that is larger in capacity and offers more parking space!

A NEW Home for the Holidays will take place for two days only, Saturday, December 2nd, and Sunday, December 3rd at 7:00 PM both evenings.
For more information on this event including ticketing details, call (310) 943-9231, or via online at  https://angelcitychorale.org/concerts-events/a-new-home.

Visit ACC through their social media outlets via Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AngelCityChorale, YouTube http://www.youtube.com/user/AngelCityChorale, Twitter https://twitter.com/AngelCityChoral and SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/angelcitychorale
———————————————————————————————————————
On behalf of the staff and management of Accessibly Live Off-Line, we wish each and everyone one of our readers and subscribers a very Happy Thanksgiving.
We’ll see you for our next edition coming the next week!
———————————————————————————————————————
ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com
#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

-30-

SENDING A WRONG TEXT

Not so long ago, somebody placed a question on the website quora.com. This is a site found on the ol’ would wide web where one can ask a question about nearly anything on any topic (within reason) and have a group of strangers answer that same question. Many of the questions are of an informative nature, such as job hunting advice, a question about history, military protocols, or about domestic life in general. Others are amusing in nature, not necessarily important per se, but are those questions one would always wanted and answer for but didn’t know how to ask, where to ask, and who to ask.

Among the many questions that were posted on this site came from an inquiring mind that asked “Have you ever accidentally texted the wrong person? What did you say?”

As one may suspect, many of the answers received (eighteen replies as last count) were humorous in nature, the same kind of small stories that people may find funny for the moment within the same realm to the antidotes once found in issues of Reader’s Digest. (“Life in Theses United States”, Humor in Uniform”, etc.) Unlike Reader’s Digest where any published story would be paid for, folks participating in Quora post their replies for free.

This writer won’t be posting those replies from that time tested question. However, we invite any and all to click on the link below to read the answers yourself and on your own time at https://www.quora.com/Have-you-ever-accidently-texted-the-wrong-person-What-did-you-say

It appears that texting, the method of communication where one can send a message using standard letters, numbers, as well as those “pictured words” known as “Emojis” through one’s cell phone has become an engrained way of life. Text messaging was the first real function of a cell phone that didn’t involve sending or receiving a voice message since the early days of the flip phone. When the first generations of smartphones (Apple’s iPhone) came upon the marketplace in 2007, it had text message capabilities, among many other things. Before too long, nearly everyone that had a cell phone ditched the “do nothing” flip phone to take upon the functions of organizing their lives, if not totally taking over their lives. And texting, as this function is called, became part of that way of life. Many folks that are old enough to hold a phone (as little age five year of age), can send messages to those that they know, or they know of. Many of these texts ring as substitutes of actually speaking to somebody on their phone through convenience, circumstance, or as a shield. The shield methods are used by some that for reasons based upon the sender and send-ee because the person or persons are too scared to talk to the other party in person–so to speak!

The method of texting can be a science, skill, or even art. Anyone over the age of seven (maybe even younger) has that ability to type up messages using their thumbs, or even thumb! (Singular). And these people can do such in a rapid pace, sending as many texts to many people in nearly the same time and speed. Those that are a bit older than adolescence can send as many texts, but choose not to since there would not be much of a point in performing such a task! (Some people read their texts sent hours, or even days after the fact!) And for the older sect, the demographic that were last in line to use cell phone technology, their texting is minimal to none. Some of these seasoned people are just getting used to using a phone to call and talk. Never mind doing anything else with them!

As to the “wrong numbers” of the texting world. The episodes told in the Quarta forum are indeed of a comical nature. Again, they may not be earth shattering news, but has become a subject to text (or retext) to one of your BFFs! One can ROTFL to their little heart’s content!

Isn’t modern life wonderful?
———————————————————————————————————————
NEWS AND REVIEWS

Performing at The Zephyr Theatre in the Melrose district of Los Angeles is the world premier of D.G. Watson’s THE TRAGEDY: A COMEDY, an unusual tale of a group of talent agents that use a unique method of “power” of receiving their next big thing within the world of entertainment.

The story revolves around a pair of small time literary/talent agents; Larry Stone (Malcolm Barrett) Lisa Conner (Tina Huang) and Derek Stahl (Brandon Scott). It appears that they can’t rustle up any promising actors for any gigs. Their business is rather going on the downside, enough to have the power shut off at their place of business due to unpaid electric bills. They need inspiration to find their “next big thing” to save their business. They call for the assistance of Tony Ramirez (Roland Ruiz), who is in the trade in dispensing not business advice, but a special blend of mushrooms that are rather potent, or actually, hallucinogenic! These agents deal not so much with starving actors, but with alternative beings that range from a motivational speaker, a Greek goddess, as well as others both real or imagined. Will these agents find their next big thing, or is that next big thing something that is part of another mind trip?

This is a rather unique comic play as it holds some idiosyncratic aspects. First, it features some rather amusing lines and plot points. Second, it comes with a number of surreal moments that doesn’t distract, but enhances its humor factor. Third, it even has some low-level audience participation spots. Playwright D. G. Watson creates a play that takes a notion of perceptual anomalies among a backdrop of the entertainment business that makes Hollywood tick! It also features a well rounded comical cast that use their physical abilities as well as their genuine wit. Ahmed Best directs this show that is funny for both the right reasons, and the tripping ones at that!

Adding to the trippiness is Mark Kanieff’s set design that makes notes to the physical hallucinatory moments the lead characters go through when they are working on their magic ‘schrooms!

The additional set of cast members also includes Kim Hamilton, Jason Ryan Lovett, and Claudia Doumit.

There is nothing tragic witnessed in this show as the title may suggest! In fact, it’s funny! Although the subject matter may not necessarily appeal to a mass audience, the entire premise is one big trip! The humor may indeed be on the dark side, but it still holds genuine laughts!

THE TRAGEDY: A COMEDY, presented by the Ammunition Theatre Company, and performs at The Zephyr Theatre, 7456 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles, until December 3rd. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday evenings at 7:00 PM. For tickets or for more information, go online at http://www.eventbee.com/event?cid=169258874#tickets
———————————————————————————————————————
ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com
#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

GREY FRIDAY

According to a recent marking report filed by the marking research sector of PwC (once known as PriceWaterhouseCoopers), some 35% of polled consumers stated that they will plan to do some shopping on “Black Friday”, that so-called “shopper’s holiday” that takes place the Friday after Thanksgiving where retail stores offers special one-day-only sales on goods that people have the desire to buy, usually in the form of Christmas/Holiday gifts for somebody on their list, or for themselves. This amount of those stating their shopping plans for that day falls a bit over one third of those asked, is down from a 51% statement by shoppers polled the previous year. In 2015, 59% noted that they will be waiting in line that day after Turkey Day to grab the goods for cheap(er)!

So what is the reason why these folks are not going to rise at dawn, head on over to their favorite retailer(s), wait in a long line, only to be ready, willing, and able to rush into the store to fight with other shoppers in their frenzy just to take advantage of grabbing something that was marked down a significant amount? A lot of reasons!

First, retailers over their many years, tied to beat each other out in starting their Black Friday sales a lot earlier, moving the Black Friday to a week before Thanksgiving. Then they moved it to October, then toward the Summer season, even having Black Friday sales all year round! This changing of the dates gave those the idea that sales take place whenever and wherever the retailers feel like it. Also, since economic times are a lot better that they have been, people have more income to grab goods! Granted, everyone likes to snag a bargain no matter how much money they have. Besides, most of the items folks tend to buy on Black Friday are for themselves. What’s the difference if you give a gift to yourself in December, or in July? And perhaps the most obvious reason why shoppers are not to keen on waiting in line on a cold(er) November morning. Thanks to the ever lovin’ internet, many of these same retailers offers Black Friday sales via the comfort of one’s internet connected device. Cyber Monday, the name of the post-Thanksgiving shopping day where additional bargains were offered via the ‘net, became popular within the last ten years. And using the same game plan that the physical stores offered, Cyber Monday was pushed earlier and earlier where is eventually became an all year-round ploy.

Amazon, the be-all-to-end-all form of shopping to many, had a “Prime Day” last summer, offering discounted items made available to their Prime members, those that fork over $99.00 a year to receive free shipping and other perks. Although Amazon didn’t state how much they made in specific terms, they did earn more during that summer day then they did on the pervious Black Friday and Cyber Monday combined!

Black Friday had been over its not-so-many years of existence, both phrased and cursed by many that’s been exposed to these sale techniques for some time. The ones that are fans to the dark end-of-week stated they they got the best deal of the hour/day/week/month/year thanks to their savvy shopping! Those that curse this day noted that the Thanksgiving weekend spoils the notion of enjoying those four days in November with family, friends, and those within their domain, as this holiday is considered a “family” holiday. Also, many people that work at these retail places may feel they must report to their job the day after Thanksgiving, sometimes reporting an hour before the store opens, sometimes as early as 4:00 AM! And there has been reports of people fighting for items ranging from pushes and shoves, to throwing fists at one another!

However, thanks to a combination of technology and savvy marketing techniques, the art of shopping for the best deals the day after Thanksgiving has lost its luster. This is a good thing for some, and a not-so-great idea for others! But as things tend to progress, so will the art of getting the best deal around for the item one wants, but not necessarily needs! Keep in mind that not everything is offered as the deal of the week! If one needs plumbing supplies, the chances that a plumbing supply outlet will offer door bustin‘ deals are rather low! Maybe the idea of offering a sale on 1/4” elbow joint pipes at 20% for one day only doesn’t have the same appeal to the majority of savvy shoppers. That is, unless one is in the market for a 1/4” elbow joint pipe fixture! (Those even make great gifts, too!)
———————————————————————————————————————
NEWS AND REVIEWS

Theatre Palisades closes out their 2017 calendar year with Steve Franco’s IN-LAWS, OUTLAWS, AND OTHER PEOPLE (THAT SHOULD BE SHOT), a comedy about a near dysfunctional family getting together for the festive season, only to have their event interrupted by a pair of outsiders that are just as dysfunctional as the rest of the bunch!

It’s Christmas Eve in Brooklyn New York. And another family gathering is about to take place. Dad Thomas (Jonathan Fahn), and his teen daughter Beth (Tessa Marts) is getting ready to host their clan for a ham dinner. Beth’s mom Janet (Terri Parks) is coming in from an out of town junket but is expected to arrive shortly. Until her arrival, there’s enough family to go around to keep things busy. The guests include Janet’s sister and brother-in-law Bud and Bunny (Andrew Margolin and Laura Goldstein), their teen daughter Tracy (Sierra Laurin Parsons), along with Aunt Rose and Uncle Leo. (Sue Hardie and Mitch Feinstein). The family receives a pair of uninvited and unexpected guests, Tony and Vinny. (Eric Pierce and Cruz Flores). These two are not family members, but a bunch of criminal that knocked over a liquor store and need a quick hideout until the heat’s off. Although Tony and Vinny take the family hostage, nobody seems to take things too serious as everyone holds their own with their mildly annoying personalities. This may not become the best Christmas ever, but it sure is different!

As one can expect, this comedy by Steve Franco is a classic example of a comic farce. The characters involved and the plot the plays is more of a cartoon show than a thrilling drama of a family under siege. The family members are the type of people one would (or could) have in your family–like it or otherwise! Vinny and Tony, as portrayed by Eric Pierce and Cruz Flores aren’t threatening, but play more as bumbling bafoons. Those elements is what makes this play enjoyable, as it’s not real or believable and should be! It’s performed for laughs! However, some of the characters depicted may remind of somebody you as somebody that you may know–or not!

Rounding out the cast includes Darcy Silveria as first neighbor Sue Draper, second neighbor Mrs. Wakowski (Lois Bostwick) and her adolescent kids Paul and Emily (Jeff DeWitt and Hayley Dixon), with Prince Johnson as Officer Henley. Everyone depicts their roles as created within the humble homestead using the set design by Theatre Palisades long standing rep set designer Sherman Wayne.

Directed by Ria Parody Erlich, this play is ideal to have a good laugh for the festive season! The whole concept is about family. The group may be of eccentric stock, but everyone still has heart in their own unique (and possibly weird) way! As the notion found within this production suggests, one can pick and choose their friends, but you are stuck with your family! Or are you really stuck?

IN-LAWS, OUTLAWS, AND OTHER PEOPLE (THAT SHOULD BE SHOT), presented by Theater Palisades, performs at the Pierson Playhouse, 941 Temescal Canyon Road (off Sunset Blvd.), Pacific Palisades, until December 10th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM.

Theatre Palisades has announced their 2018 season of plays and musicals. The new season opens with Arthur Miller’s The Price on January 12th, followed by Rick Abbot’s Play On! on April 6th. On June 8th, Frederick Knott’s Write Me A Murder opens, followed by Bark! A Musical on August 31st. Winding up the season is the comedy Parfumerie on November 2nd.

For more information on all shows including how to make reservations for IN-LAWS…, call (310) 454-1970, or via online at http://www.TheatrePalisades.com
———————————————————————————————————————
This humble reviewer recently had the opportunity to stumble across a little jazz club located within an out-of-the-way restaurant located within the downtown region. The club calls itself Bar Fedora, named after the hat that made Frankie of Hoboken famous for donning. This hint sets the mood for this place–a small dimly lit location that sports an art deco-esque motif that one can find perched in the back of a cosmopolitan dressed restaurant, very much akin to those jazz clubs that grew from the speakeasy era and were the set place to hear live jazz. This spot is more tidy as it’s not smokey (thanks to current bans of smoking inside of eateries), but is friendly enough to have a drink, perhaps to grab a light meal, and to ponder upon the musical notes heard within.

One venture yours truly attended was last Saturday, November 4th. On the bill that night was something called “The Triad Sessions”, consisting of a trio of “..ladies with unique voices, solo sets, and three part harmonies”. (The term used in quotes were taken from the ad bills for this show, but this writer will borrow those words because it sums up to what the show was really about!)

The three ladies performing in question were as listed in alphabetical order, L. Aviva Diamond, Kathryn Hopkins, and Karen Celeste Kruz. These vocalists did what the notices states. They all shared the imitate stage setting signing something old (“classic”), something new, (“original”) as well as the borrowed and blue monikers. The “blue” used here was more of a bluesy tone, rather that sadness or the color. Nothing heard was really sad, while blue is the color that represents cleanness, and being clean is a good!

These three do work as a team as that can present tunes via the three part harmony setting, yet they do host themselves as soloists. Although all three hail from this region, Kathryn Hopkins originates from New Zealand, part of the “down under” that piece of the world is usually referred as. Her native accent she holds just enhances her singing voice, presenting the fine jazz numbers that had indeed held through the test of time.

Backing up these ladies was a five piece band, featuring Nolan Shaheed on trumpet, Rich Eames on the keyboards, Gabe Davis on bass, Al Garcia on guitar, and Kevin Winard on percussion.

This small yet mighty concert is part of a series of musical sessions called Saturday Night Jazz DTLA, where for a number of Saturday nights along with a few isolated Friday night gigs, one can hear a selection of jazz musical artists and vocalists, with a little blues and R&B added for measure.

The shows take place at Bar Fedora, located within the Au Lac restaurant, 710 West 1st Street (at Hope Street), downtown Los Angeles, right along the shadow of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion and the Walt Disney Concert Hall. For more information on the Saturday Night Jazz DTLA series as well as ticket reservations, visit
http://www.SaturdayNightJazzDTLA.com
———————————————————————————————————————
ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com
#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

THE EVER CHANGING FACE OF MEDIA

It’s been going on for many years, a lot longer that people have realized. But media, be it as print or electronic, is undergoing yet another phase of its long(er) life and times.

Perhaps the most obvious change is the difference between online based media and so-called traditional stock. The latter (traditional) means the form of media that’s been around for generations, if not “forever”. The former (online), referrers to anything that associates itself via a wired or wireless connection that is linked to anything that is called the internet.

First, let’s go to the traditional elements: newspapers, radio, and television. Newspapers, of simply, “the news”, is perhaps the oldest of the three. Newspapers in this nation, as well as in other industrial based communities, has been the prime method to deliver the news of importance. Depending on the newspaper in question, one can find out what’s going on based on the topics the paper covers, as well as its community where the newspaper is based. The news can be important or trivial. Many smaller towns that had newspapers featured “community news” that gave reports of local events from city council meetings to the reports filed by local clubs and organizations. (Much of the featured articles that appeared in one local paper published in Los Angeles, once called “The Van Nuys Daily News” featured said stories filed from such groups as the local woman’s clubs and fraternal groups as The Lions, The Rotary, and related organizations well into the 1970’s!)

Radio came around the 1920’s that offered news and entertainment. It took a while for radio to catch on since radio receivers were rather pricey for what they were. When the great depression hit, it became a choice for entertainment since radio prices dropped a bit and the radio signals were available for free! It was also the prime source for news during the days of World War II as that war made radio a prime leader in broadcasting news. Newspapers, at first thought that their business would be killed by radio since this medium could offer faster and timely news and information. However, newspapers still continued to thrive.

After the war, television stepped in to become the next choice, taking one major advantage of radio. If offered pictures while radio didn’t! Although TV did catch on right away, many folks didn’t necessarily get a set because of price as well as the lack of receiving local TV signals. The three broadcasting networks saw an opportunity in television, slowly phasing out entertainment radio programs throughout the 1950’s. However, radio continued to thrive but into a different format calling for news, more music, as well as entertaining talk and discussion. Newspapers still hung around as well!

The biggest and perhaps most profound change in when the internet started to creep into the 1990’s. Many newspapers and print magazines began their websites in the during this period. However, the only way to receive such stuff online back then was to get access to a computer with an internet connection. If one didn’t have one or the other at their home, there was the public library or an internet cafe-a public place that one can sit in front of a connected computer. However, libraries offered limited time for patrons to use their machine, and internet cafes rented their time by the hour or half hour. By the turn of the 21st century, subscribing to an internet service at home became cheaper and more practical. (Ditto for getting those computer machines!) Did radio, TV, and newspapers feel the crunch by this new competition? Eventually, they did!

In today’s media landscape, newspapers are either throwing their emphasis through their websites and through their spots on social media. Many newspapers and magazines that were once print sources are now online only, such as “The Seattle Post Intellenger”, “The Christian Science Monitor”, and soon, “The Village Voice”, among many other titles. Radio has seen some changes as well. CBS is the last traditional broadcasting source that held out in radio, although they are in the process of selling off their stations and network. (NBC sold its network and stations in the late 1980’s, and ABC sold off its radio portion in the middle 2000’s.) Television is giving away to streaming sources such as Amazon, Hulu, and the biggest one of ‘em all, Netflix, allowing subscribers to view content whenever they want and how much at a time, without those pesky commercials, too! Many of the cable channels in addition to “the big four” offers streaming service as well, either for a monthly fee (no commercials), or for free. (Advertising supported, meaning commercials included!) However, the best part is the fact that one can get access to these programs with any device that connects to the ‘net and sports a video screen! So if you want to binge an entire season of The Handmaid’s Tale on their smartphone, then so be it!

We here at Accessibly Live Off-Line has also felt the change. We stopped our print service many years ago, and on October 1st, we announced to our e-mail subscribers that we will discontinue the e-mail delivery service with its final e-mail edition as issue Vol. 22-No. 51. But don’t worry folks! Accessibly Live Off-Line will still remain online at http//www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com. Again, we are just going with the flow!

Time and tide will tell what will become the next big media based thing! It’s somewhat hard to tell what this media may be, allowing other forms to place its virtual head on the chopping block. Just as long as the ideas flow, so will its next element ready to take over! However, as its been said for many a time, stay tuned!
———————————————————————————————————————
NEWS AND REVIEWS
Performing at West Hollywood’s The Other Space at the Actors Company is Shirley Lauro’s THE RADIANT, a biographical story of Marie Curie, whose knowledge in science and physics lead toward a major discovery in medicine, but not without the consequences she faced while researching those studies.

Nina Salinen portrays Marie Curie née Maria Sklodowska. A woman of Polish decent, she studied physics in Paris, eventually meeting her husband Pierre Curie. The play opens in 1906, right after Pierre’s death due to a tragic accident. Now standing as a widow, Marie, a professor of General Physics at the university where she studied, continues her work in spite of the fact that she is living on a widow’s pension. While working on a scientific research project, she encounters Paul Langevin (Conrad Cecil). Paul himself has a family of his own. Yet the time these two work within the laboratories leads from a professional relationship to more of an intimate venture. This affair continues toward a major scandal within the Parisian community as to a woman of science taking advantage of a fling with a much young man that has a wife and three children, as well as the sexism and xenophobia that was occurring during this era. But Curie’s research and discoveries lead toward her winning a pair of Nobel Prizes, the sole female to ever achieve these accomplishes.

This one-act play is presented on an intimate theater set. Its various sets as designed by Karen Ipock is staged as a seamless cluster, making this program’s visuals and performances very tight. With a cast of four players, featuring Andrea Flowers as Katarina (Marie’s seventeen year old niece), and John Moschitta Jr. (in various roles) in addition to the above noted Nina Salinen and Conrad Cecil, this program in not only entertaining, but very informative and even inspiring. It presents a woman that faced tragic events–some of these episodes were based upon her making, yet her discoveries created a much desired link that continued on to scientific research methods that still holds up to the present day.

Directed by Jane Edwina Seymour, THE RADIANT “radiates” quality theatre. This production is also a fine example of a “big production inside of a small package”. As to the theatre space: It may be a bit hard to find as the theater itself is located off the street facing an alley-type setting. However, the journey to experience this play is well worth the search.

THE RADIANT, presented by Resource Performance Workshop & Stories About Humans, performs at the The Other Space at The Actors Company, 916A North Formosa Avenue, (two blocks south of Santa Monica Blvd. and one block west of La Brea), West Hollywood, until November 19th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM. For ticket reservations, call (323) 960-7712, or via online at http:www.Plays411.com/Radiant
———————————————————————————————————————
The Glendale Centre Theatre continues its run with IS HE DEAD?, David Ives’ adaptation of Mark Twain’s story about a failed artist living in Paris who stages his own death for the sake of increasing the value of his own paintings!

Grayson Wittenbarger is Jean-Francious Millet, an artist working in Paris in the middle 19th century. He’s anything but successful and in debt. He is set to marry his fiancee Marie Leroux (Ashlee Abrams). Her father Papa Leroux (Tom Hall) is also deep in debt, owning an amount of francs to the same man Millet is owed to: the villain Bastien Andre (Ted Wells). While in his studio with his two best friends, Agamemnon “Chicago” Buckner (Joshua Evans) and Hans Von “Dutchy” Bismarck (Austin LaCroix), they make an accidental discovery with a potential buyer of one of his works who asks if the artist is dead. The theory goes is once an artist dies, the paintings created by the now deceased artist increases in value. An idea is hacked where Millet fakes his own death, and in disguise, become his “sister”, even donning a poofy french gown and a curly wig. Of course, Millet become praised as a great dead artist, while his “sister” become the fancy of many a man, receiving proposals for marriage. Is Millet better off as a living legion or just better off dead?

This comedy is loaded with slapstick, mistaken identities, and plenty of opportunities to have the lead protagonist dress up in drag! The action and comedy moves in a frantic pace that just gets better as it progresses. The cast of performers that appear in this production that also includes Cheryl Ann Carlson, Cara Newman Ruyle, Barbara Trenn, John David Wallis, and Alex White, keeps up to the comical timing as directed by Todd Nielsen. Such timing never slacks from its opening scene to its climatic conclusion!

Since this is a period comedy, there are the period visuals in the method of Angela Manke’s costuming, and JC Windel’s scenic designs.

This is the first time the GCT presented this play. In fact, Mark Twain (nee Samuel Clemens), wrote the draft to this play in 1898, but was never formally produced. If was found in the early 2000‘s within the holdings of Twain’s manuscript collection at UC Berkeley. David Ives, whose many comic plays include the audience favorite All In The Timing, adapted it for the modern stage. It was well worth the 100 or so year wait as it still remains a forcefull hoot! And what better way to experience this piece is at the CGT in a theatre-in-the-round setting. At 360 degrees, it’s just as funny, no matter what angle it’s seen!

IS HE DEAD?, presented by and performs at the Glendale Centre Theatre. 324 North Orange Street, Glendale, until November 18th Showtimes are Friday, and Saturday evenings at 8:00 PM, with Saturday and Sunday matinees at 3:00 PM.
The GCT will once again present the time-tested Charles Dickens classic, A CHRISTMAS CAROL, running from November 24th through December 24th. For more details on these two productions, call (818) 244-8481, or visit the GCT’s web site at http://www.GlendaleCentreTheatre.com

———————————————————————————————————————
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE (Universal/Dreamworks) stars Miles Teller, Joe Cole, Scott Haze, and Beulah Koale as four servicemen who completed their tour of duty fighting the war in Iraq, returning home to their midwestern community of Topeka, Kansas. Sargent Adam Schumann (Teller) is married with a family, His spouse Saskia (Haley Bennett) is the mother of two young kids. Will Waller (Cole), is another serviceman who survived many a battle being “blown-up” several times while in combat, Tausolo “Solo” Aeiti (Koale) has an injury to his head due to an exploding bomb. Michael Emory (Haze) received a bullet in the head that disabled him to the point where he’s learning how to walk, speak and overall function. And rounding out this group is Amanda Doster (Amy Schumer) whose husband was killed just a few days before his tour of duty was completed. This bunch, now living a civilian life, must face many of the consequences of post-military life that deal with physical and emotional healing, handling government “red tape”, as well as the attempt to remain military strong long after the battles and gunfire has ceased.

Jason Hall, the screenwriter to the 2014 feature film release American Sniper, adapts and directs David Finkel’s book of the same name that examines a set of military personnel who served their nation in war, only to return not so much as heroes, but shadows of their former selves. The feature isn’t so much a traditional war movie where battles are depicted, troops are deployed, and an enemy is targeted (and vice vera). This film is more of a dramatic view of soldiers going through post traumatic stress that affect themselves and those around them. The movie’s basic tone is somber and somewhat depressing where each lead player is losing an inner war than winning an outer one. Such a theme would make a good melodrama set for the smaller (video) screen, but not so much for the big (theatre) setting. In fact, a good number of scenes depicted of people in this movie as staged by cinematographer Roman Vasyanov consist of medium shots and close ups of the characters, a method that is commonly used in TV programs and related productions fit for video consumption. This format to stage shots would give the impression that this movie will hold its shelf life longer existing on electronic media that one that is viewed in a theater type setting.

This feature, as well as the many other titles released within the last quarter of the calendar is geared toward voting members of movie-based awards, and not so much for a general audience such to the blockbuster hits released in the Summer season. Again, there is nothing wrong to target a movie title for a specific audience. However, one should keep in mind why movies are made and why people will still go to the movies as seen in a theatre! (Hint: The answers involve making money and being entertained!)

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE is rated “R” for war violence, implied sex scenes, and assorted cussing. Now playing in selected theaters nationwide.
———————————————————————————————————————
ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com
#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!