BEWARE THE BLUE SCREEN O’ DEATH!

In last week’s edition, we ran an article that was based upon a notation that appeared on AARP’s website. This time around, we will return back to this non-profit organization whose mission is to respect those that are of a certain age. Mainly, those aged fifty and up.

In the current July/August issue of the AARP Bulletin, a print publication that serves as a supplement to their bimonthly magazine AARP Magazine that was once called “Modern Maturity” once published in the era when the name AARP actually stood for something, featured an article entitled The Blue Screen Of Death that was a scam alert report that dealt with outsiders hijacking one’s PC with a “freeze”, “crash”, or using the for mentioned screen color, where one’s machine would not work and thus their computer device would become “kidnapped”. These outsiders would then place a warning notice to call some phone number in order to get access to their internal files. Of course, a “ransom” would have to be paid to get the files back and have one’s PC back to normal operations.

The article went on to say that scammers would also make random phone calls, informing the call-ee that they were a representative from Microsoft informing the person they dialed that their machine was defective. They had to visit some website to download some kind of software in order to get their machine “fixed”, only to either gain access to any personal information that might be found, or to hijack their device for the usual amount of dough.

Of course, the article was targeting those of AARP’s general demographic, mostly of the older ‘first tier” Baby Boomers born between 1946 to 1955, or those of the “Silent” or “Greatest Generation”, born before 1946. Generally, this is the standard age demographic that is over the age of sixty, and became last in line in terms of getting access to post modern technology. This demographic would most likely to fall for such traps, and those on the other end of this scam are fully aware that anyone of this bracket would indeed cater to their wishes.

The reason why the AARP article is being mentioned here is the fact that once in a while, yours truly will encounter these attempts to grab hold of my computer machine for one’s advantage, either through an e-mail, through a website, or by way of a phone call received through various days and times.
This writer tends to tolerate these unsolicited calls, mostly done by robots presenting a prerecorded pitch of some sort. However, once in a while I will get a call from a live person informing me about something or another. And one of these calls comes from a “technician” from (surprise?) Microsoft informing me about something wrong with my PC.

Depending on what mood I am in when these calls arrive, I sometimes have a little fun with these folks in order to play along and to see how they will react, going along with their gag and keeping it up until I am ready to deliver the punch line.

To give an example, I received a call that consisted of a rather poor connection (internet phone call no doubt) from a person that had an accent that may be somebody from east India, or some southeast Asian nation. Anyway, this person, never asking for somebody by name, identifies himself as a tech from Microsoft informing me of something that is playing havoc with their operating system, and asked me if I was on my computer right that moment.

Of course, I could have hung up of this guy. But again, I was feeling like I can play along with this man. So I tried to disguise my voice making an attempt to imitate Maude Frickert, the little old lady character created by Jonathan Winters in the 1960’s and was part of his long running comedy routine. I even used this character as a little old lady who was just as feisty as she was in her youth, a time that was never seen but referred to in many of Winters’ skits and routines.

Although I don’t necessarily recall the phone conversation I had with this “technician” word-for-word, I’ll try to recreate it nearly as much as I can remember, perhaps making it more funnier than it really went. The conversation will read as to a radio script and will include any grammar errors as this caller’s primary language wasn’t English!

TECH: (In heavy east Indian accent) Good day, I am Michael from Microsoft Corporation, informing you that your PC may have a virus and need to have checked out.
ME: (In a third-rate sounding Maude Frickert voice) Huh? What? Speak up Sonny!
TECH: This is Michael with Microsoft Corporation informing you have a virus on your PC. Do you have your PC on right now?
ME: Do I have my what on?
TECH: Your PC. We are testing if your PC has virus.
ME: What’s a PC?
TECH: Your computer, Do you have it on?
ME: What’s wrong with my computer?
TECH: We are checking to see if your PC has a virus. It must be check out or you can’t get data access.
ME: My computer doesn’t work? I didn’t do anything!
TECH: You must turn it on so you can download software to get it working again.
ME: Oh no! How can I watch my porn sites on my machine? I need to get to my porn sites so I will know what I am missing out on!
TECH: Do you have your computer on right now?
ME: I have to get to my PC because I need to see those porn sites to remind myself how hot I was back in the day! I once saw some gal with bazooms just as big as I used to have!

From this point, I was going through a routine where I was telling “Michael” about how frisky I was and how I would “do it” every day with a team of hot studs that was banging down my door. I went through this routine for around five minutes until I realized that “Michael” hung up on me! I wasted a good three minutes taking to dead air! At least the guy would have had the courtesy to tell me he was hanging up. Otherwise, I could have finished my schtick and delivered the punch line that never arrived!

As a rather savvy tech person, in spite of the fact that I do fall within AARP’s targeted audience, I never have to worry about getting my machine hijacked from afar. My old Macintosh Pro using a 10.7 operating system (I don’t need to upgrade since all of my software works fine as it is) can’t read viruses that were made for a Windows OS. When I do get a notice, it asks me if I want to download this software or to reject it. (“Duh” to that question!) I guess scammers don’t want to bother with creating viruses that conflict with Apple users. So what I did would make Steve Jobs proud, or even Jonathan Winters! (*Sigh*!)
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

Normally, this writer doesn’t make it a habit to inform the public about a show or event that has since passed. This “after the fact” review could be on the same level to telling somebody about a happening that they missed out of since it was for one-time only to eventually disappear. However, this same writer will inform you about a previous event that was something worth the notice.

There is a group called The CRE Outreach (“C”reate “R”eflect “E”mpower) based in Los Angeles proper that serves as a non-profit performing arts group calling its dedication to empowering under served individuals from lower income populations focusing upon the performing arts, educational programs, and theatre as a method to enhance self esteem, encourage self expression, and to empower individuals to overcome the challenges experienced in their lives.

The CRE Outreach has established a number of groups that beckons to their objectives. One group is The Blind Dance Company that consists of dancers that have limited to no sight. As the name suggests, they are all totally blind!

On Saturday, August 12th, the BDC held their dance residual called “Emotions” that took place at The Lazarus Experience lofts in downtown Los Angeles in the fashion district. (This loft setting housed in a one-time industrial building built c.1926 now serves as a multipurpose area.) Here, a team of seven African-American dances consisting of (listed in alphabetical order), William Andrus, Ronald Chism, Barbara Ford, Natalie Gross, Christina Hognson, Kenny Lee, and Syvia Taylor, performed in a number of dance routines that ranges from contemporary style, ballroom, waltz, salsa, swing, as well as hip-hop freestyle and fusion, all without the aid of sight.

The program directed & choreographed by Hydeia Muhammad, focused upon these sightless individuals that can perform such dance moves using music rhythm, movement placement, as well as the emotional willingness and ability to perform dance steps (some rather tricky and complex when it comes to hip-hop) to guide them under a visionless environment. It was indeed a classic example of “dancing in the dark”.

To present a brief idea of these dancer’s abilities in one presentation, Natalie Gross was performing a solo contemporary dance routine when for a few seconds, the music track stopped due to a technical mishap. However, Natalie continued her dance measures in silence while the music was able to be resumed, never missing a beat in the process!

Currently, the CRE Outreach is undergoing a fund raising campaign via Kickstarter.com to build their new permanent theatre space located in the Culver City area. (The campaign will begin in September.) Until then, it’s possible to follow the progress of this group through many of the online social media portals out there in cyberspace land via Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. (Links below)
http://.www.facebook.com/CreOutreach http://.www.twitter.com/CreOutreach; http://.www.youtube.com/CreOutreach;
For more information on CRE Outreach, visit http://www.CreOutreach.org
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is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

THE BEST YEAR(S) OF YOUR LIFE

Not so long ago (last year really), an article appeared on the AARP web site within the Disrupt Aging section (identified as #DisruptAging to make it appear that its members, subscribers, and those that show interest are up to the times) that asked those in various stages within their lives upon the question to what was the best year of your life? These people raging from age seventeen through 103 (as of 2016) gave a brief note on what they felt was the best year of their life, based upon the age they were at the time, what was going on within their domain, and other factors where they felt were the moment(s) they reached a peak in their standing through a change that made them better, aware, or by way some form of existence that was in their own good.

Of course, the younger ones pointed out a moment that took place within the last few years, while the older ones, especially the ones that would fit within the AARP’s targeted demographic, sited a time or era long past. Their brief rundown states why that year or period was indeed their best, and what occurred to make it higher in their timeline than any other moment. Of course, that change was for the better for all as every statement profiled made them successful within their own rights.

For some people, a single year or time could have been a “best” because of an event or happening that stuck around for them, making its presence known for years after and lasting to the moment of now. Others might have experienced a “best year”, only to have that year fade into total oblivion where it makes no sense presently. A few might have experienced a number of “best years” for various reasons. Some might have lasted for years afterward, other might have long faded to black, while a few moments held that magic because the time was right, but will never be repeated the same way ever again due to circumstances that are not necessarily through their making. That moment took place, it went away, and is gone because the names and places are different or no longer exist. But when it occurred, it was indeed part of the “best year” of one’s life so far!

Speaking for yours truly, I have had a number of “best years” that I had gone through. Some were pleasant and somewhat trivial as seen in today’s post modern world. A selection were best for what they were until something better came along to take its place, and some were indeed best because they still remain within my reach to this very day! However, not any one of these years would top the other because each one of those moments were best for what they were. It’s the same idea to ask a parent of more that one child asking which one is the favorite. One will be the favorite because of one or more reasons, while the second (or third, or maybe more), is the pick because of something else. However, one isn’t necessarily better than another.

To explain this notion from yours truly’s standpoint, I had a number of these best years just because of some of the events that were part of my surroundings. One year I will use as this example (and I won’t mention the year or to the age I was within that year) was the best because I was exposed to a number of people that were around based around the school I was attending at the time. Also, I was more of a TV junkie then as I am today, and a lot of what was on the tube made that year as magic. I can’t really pinpoint on why that occurrence of watching TV as special, but it was! There was another year that was the best because it did indeed give me a change for the better that interestingly enough, did last for years and is still hanging around to this very day! That change way back when isn’t in the same form or appearance is it would be now, but nevertheless remains. If it didn’t stick around, this writer would not be spiting out articles such as this one that tells these true and amazing tales for all to read and wonder.

In spite of all of these years, one element does hold a common bond. When all of these events and occurrences that were taking place, I personally didn’t know that the events, people, places, and things would later been seen as a “best year”. Those people, places, and things were just around and that was that! One doesn’t necessarily know that what is occurring would later move toward something that would eventually be classified as nostalgia. It was the present, one was living through it, and that is how it worked. What made it as a best was only recognized long after the fact.

These best years are generally the total opposite to the “worst years” that people also experience. Granted, these moments of not-so-great are not seen within the same limelight as to the years that was the best, but nearly everyone holds those to their personal life as much as those moments that were better. It’s just not something one would want to admit, let alone be as material source for an journalistic article.

To sum everything up, what are the best year of one’s life? To phrase a line that was part of the lyrics in the song “Anticipation” (made famous by singer Carly Simon and was once used as a commercial jingle for Heinz ketchup in the 1970’s), it states that “these are the good old days”. Perhaps you the reader are experiencing your best year of your life right now. You may know this or you may not. If you do, then let your Facebook friends become aware about it, tweet about it to your little heart’s content, and post a moving image on YouTube detailing this point. For those that don’t know about it yet? Don’t worry! You will eventually find out! Really!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

Continuing its run at North Hollywood’s Secret Rose Theatre is the Jeff Gould comedy THE MARRIAGE ZONE, a surreal comic play about a middle aged couple who meets up with two other couples in different stages of their lives that reflects as their own!

Cal (Kenny Johnston, alternating with Jeff Pride) and Beth (Rene Ashton, alternating with Anne Leighton) are a couple that’s been together for some twenty or so years, raising a fifteen year old son Ryan (Ciaran Brown, alternating with Zach Louis). They are moving up in their world. So for their progression, they have their house up for sale. A knock on their door brings some interested buyers to the home, Mike (Alex Hyde-White, alternating with Mark Sande) and Liz (Jacee Jule, alternating with Dawn Joyal). This pair is some twenty years younger, and are in the process of starting out in their lives as the two recently became engaged. As Mike and Liz are looking over the home, another knock on the door occurs as Ellie (Megan Barker, alternating with Britt Rose) enter. They are twenty years older that Cal and Beth. But a certain element is discovered as these two couples hold a connection between Beth and Cal. Does Mike and Liz portray themselves as what Beth and Cal were to each other a generation or two before? And is Ellie and Skip represent a version that’s twenty years into the future? How can Beth and Cal handle the fact that their lives have flashed before their eyes? Is this a message warning them of the things that were and is? Does Ellie and Skip hold the key to what is about to take place? Or are these other folks really just interested in the house currently on the real estate market?

This one act play, written and directed by Jeff Gould, is very witty. The barbs and gags has its comic appeal where a simple situation takes upon many ironic twists without losing any of its humor. For its eighty minute running time, one will become highly amused that speak upon the notions that marriages starts off on its good foot, leading to a number of stubbed toes along the way, and finally setting its pace on either having the marriage stand on its own two feet, or to have its feet stepped on, if not being tripped over!

This show features a rotating cast roster that vary during each performance. Please check with the staff management on who is going to appear in the performance and when! However, it doesn’t really matter on who will be present on stage as THE MARRIAGE ZONE is very witty and funny to say the least! It’s also very honest as well as being linked as a married couple (man and woman in this case) does has its moments! Maybe not the same moments as depicted on stage, but it can get pretty close!

THE MARRIAGE ZONE, performs at The Secret Rose Theatre, 11246 Magnolia Blvd. (one block west of Lankershim), North Hollywood, until September 24th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 3:00 PM. For ticket reservations or for more details, call (323) 960-7784, or via http://www.Plays411.com/MarriageZone
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Performing at the Pan-Andreas Theatre in Hollywood is the musical ON THE TWENTIETH CENTURY, the 1930’s screwball comic romp about a Broadway show producer’s mad effort to lure a leading film actress to star in his next production while aboard a train heading off to The Big Apple, with a few other rogues in tow.

The plot sets upon Oscar Jaffee (Wade Kelley) a stage show producer whose ego is much bigger than the past stage pieces he’s produced, all laying eggs while his creditors are after him. Now with his theater house shut down, he boards the 20th Century Limited train in Chicago for a sixteen hour journey heading to New York. On that same train is actress Lily Garland. (Alena Bernardi). She was once featured in his plays, now becoming a star of the silver screen. WIth that fame, he hopes to convince Lily to be featured in his next show that will save his career. However, Lily is on her way to be signed up with competing stage producer Max Jacobs (Stephen Juhl) for his next production. In order to lure Lily from Max, he has to offer her more money than what his competitor can provide. Also aboard is Litita Primrose (Georgan George), a woman that might (or might not be) an heiress of some sort. Using her as a promising backer, Oscar gives Lily a better offer, but he must deal with Lily’s new beau, fellow film star and leading man-type Bruce Granit (Nathan Jenisch), who is just as narcissistic as Oscar. All of this action (among many other antics) takes its stand on the rails before arriving at Grand Central Station.

This musical by Cy Coleman on score, and Better Conden and Adolph Green on lyrics and book, is one of those stage musicals that a theatre company would and could arrange as a lavish stage production, complete with large sets, detailed costumes, along with a robust team of stage players that can act, sing, and dance within an elaborate show stopping presentation equal to a Great White Way stage program. This may be true, but what’s seen here is more of a scaled down version of an epic theatre piece. That form of miniature impression is what makes this program more appealing! The performers that appear in this production that featured the above named players, in addition to Rafael Orduna, Nate Beals, Philip McBride, Chelsea Pope, Anagabriela Cordero, Tatiana Gomez, Nicole Sevey, Talya Sindel, and Rowan Treadway perform near the audience, especially if one is seated within the front row! The orchestra musical direction as provided by Alena Bernardi consists of four players: Cynthia Cook-Heath on the upright piano, Millie Martin on bass, Michael Dubin on percussion, and Christain Robinson on trumpet. This small yet mighty musical group adds to this show’s less-is-more attitude. Their sound enhances this method of intimate theatre as everyone that appears provides an impression to those experiencing this show that everyone is having a great time on stage. (True indeed!) Trace Oakley directs this program with the same allure that this presentation shows itself off in its same straightforward method.

No doubt that this musical speaks for another period for ironically, the 20th century where Broadway shows were as big, if not bigger, than movies, train travel was the way to go from here to far, and television was stall part of science fiction. That is what makes nostalgia just what it is, and ON THE TWENTIETH CENTURY is part of that era that was, or could have been!

ON THE TWENTIETH CENTURY, presented by The Proof Doubt Closer Theatre Company, performs at the Pan Andreas Theatre, 5119 Melrose Avenue (at rear), Hollywood, until August 27th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM.
For tickets and for more information, call (800) 838-3006, or online at
http://www.ProofDoubtCloser.com

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

HD-TV…FOR FREE!

In the overwired media saturated world most of us live in, just about anywhere and everywhere one heads off to, one can get access to various form of media, both the visual and audible kind. Although that same form of media can be obtained through invisible methods, most of what the standard user obtains receives it in exchange for some kind of tariff or fee. This price is one has to shell out on a month-to-month basis just to gain access, from the basic internet connection to the moving imagery one views their TV programming on demand.

It’s hard to conceive for many of the domestic demographics currently in existence that television, no matter what method one consumes this medium (traditional video monitor, phone device, electronic had, etc.) was once available for the cost of nothing! Just place an outdoor antenna on the roof, turn on the TV machine, and if the reception is decent, one will receive video pictures and audio sounds coming out from that box. One can use an indoor antenna as well, from the classic “rabbit ears” device or a simple metal rod. Just as one can pick up a signal from somewhere, then TV broadcasts are there for the “taking”–for gratis!

Since the 1980’s, cable television started to become the be-all-to-end-all when it came to consuming video. Depending on one’s chose of programming as well as the source providing it, one can receive some 35 channels (later moving toward 50, 75, 100 and even 200+ video outlets) that offer news, sports, kid’s programs, educational/instructional program material, and many other kind of shows to fit most interests and personal tastes. For an additional fee, one can get channels featuring uncut and uncensored movies and some original shows that are just as uncut and unedited! And best of all, there were no annoying commercials to sit through! Unless one wanted to move away from the TV set in order to grab some snacks from the kitchen or to answer nature’s call, the viewer would have to sit through the entire show not missing out of anything. There would be no breaks or pauses in the action. But that is the price to pay–outside of the monthly charge one can to shell out to receive those uncensored movies and stuff–to consume “premium” TV. Those cable companies that sold this service never called it as “pay TV”! It was usually billed as “premium television”, “upscale channels”, or some other moniker that made the subscribers believe that they were getting their money’s worth for the privilege of watching movies that has all of the original sex and violence attached to it, peppered with loads of cussing heard on its soundtrack!

Although TV choices and its equivalent are no longer limited to what’s being fed through a coax cable, one can get one of those TV streaming devices (Apple TV, Roku, etc.) that plugs into a monitor through a special cable while the box itself is plugged into to a cable or line feeding an internet based connection. However, one still has to pony up to get those choices. The TV viewer can see the same kind of shows as fed through a coax. There’s the news, sports, educational, kid-vid, and other picks for those that wants it! (Don’t forget the uncensored stuff, too!) But as long as one shells out the bucks for the selected privilege, then it’s there for all!

But get this folks! It’s quite possible to get selected television program choices all for the taking! That’s right, gang. This is TV that one doesn’t have to steal ‘cuz it’s free! No cost! Sans charge! On the house!

And how can one get all of that TV for nothing? It’s easy, simple, and best of all, it’s free! (Or nearly free!) Just place a TV antenna on the roof of one’s dwelling, or find a pair of classic style “rabbit ears” and connect it to the antenna input of the TV device. If your reception is good, you will receive high definition signals coming from local stations. That is how it’s done, just like the the days of old. Granted, one may not receive as many channels as one would get from a cable company of those internet connected TV boxes. However, how many channels one really needs to watch? With 200+ channels at one’s disposal, it’s not likely, if not humanly possible, to view every bit of video imagery at any point in time. Besides, not every channel of programming is for all personal tastes. So if you don’t care to watch kickboxing matches but would rather tune to through provoking documentaries, what channel are you going to tune to, The Kickboxing Channel? Unless The Kickboxing channel programs a documentary on kickboxing so something of that ilk, you will be out of luck!

So there you go folks! That good ol’ TV antenna that’s been masted on the roof for years still works to this very day! And think of the return of investment one’s going to get! In 1976, Radio Shark offered its Realistic brand VHF/UHF outdoor antenna that was easy to set up that cost around $19.95 in 1976 dollars. According to an online inflation calculator found at http://www.in2013dollars.com/, $19.95 would be equal to around $85.23–the same price for a month’s worth of cable/satellite TV! Sure, you may get more channels for that money, but considering that the antenna, some 41 years old, is still working! Not bad for a device that’s already reached its mid point in its life! No “over the hill” celebrations needed for that!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

BALL YARDS, Chuck Faerbar’s comical satire of the world of sports, makes its world premier at The Zephyr Theatre located in the heart of the Melrose district of Los Angeles.

In this show, a series of short vignettes that deal with the subjects on sports are presented through various means. The skits consists of a leader of a Ku Klux Klan chapter practices his golf swing at a southern based golf course while in “uniform”, a poet laureate radio program host heard on publicly supported media makes his effort of commentary waxing poetic upon a baseball legion, a pair of TV play-by-play personalities for a college football game gets more into discussing “blue-chip” team material rather than the actual match-up, a football player making a switch to participating in springboard diving, a meeting between the head coach of the Olympic woman’s field hockey team and a TV producer with the attempt to spin a backstory on the coach making it more dramatic that is would be otherwise, a sports commentator with a hidden obsession for Condoleezza Rice, and other passing episodes that develops the elements of post-modern sports as just what it is.

This collection of skits written by Chuck Faerbar that speak about the subject of sports are not limited to “the big four” (baseball, basketball, football, and hockey), which gives this collection a slice of its appeal. In fact, basketball is barley covered here, while hockey is only limited to woman’s field hockey–the one time fodder of ABC’s Wide World of Sports and currently serves as occasional filler material airing on ESPN2 and/or ESPN-U. The comic quality of the skits in question are somewhat hit and miss. A selection of these scenes, such as a sports radio commentator opening his show “Jim Rome” style with rapid barbs and “drop-in” sound effects, is rather amusing, while other vignettes become a bit on the serious side, meaning that it may not feel proper to laugh at times. But the effort and promise for comical satire does exists here. In this show, a cast of seven performers consisting of (as listed in alphabetical order), Marissa Drammissi, Bryon Hays, John Marzilli, Mike Ross, Matt Shea, Scott Takeda, and Chris Wood) appear as various single characters, along with a few that do make a cross reference in continuity.

Richard Kulman directs this one-act showcase that moves in a rather quick pace. Even though the vignettes are not necessarily connected to one another, the backdrop as designed by Gary Lee Reed serves as its link, made up as three white panels that swing as a wall parallel to most of the audience, or as perpendicular depending on the skit. There is a locket room setting off stage left and a chain link fence corner off stage right, but most of the action is performed within the center stage area. These facts on the staging, among other visual stage elements not mentioned within this review, may appear to be boring but is important to this stage production nevertheless.

BALL YARDS may consist of a stadium, open playing field, a media studio, or any space where the game of sports is played or discussed. There are other locations as well such as sports bars with their massive amount of table space, stools to plop one’s rear ends on, along with enough TV screens to conger tremendous eye strain–not counting the noise level heard at these joints! Perhaps a place such as that that can be used as a subject matter for the sequel to this anthology. (Ditto for any attempt to watch a televised game on a 2” screen found on a smartphone face!) But as long as there will be an interest in the game of sports, BALL YARDS will prevail!

BALL YARDS, presented by Theatre Planners and performs at The Zephyr Theatre, 7456 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles, until August 27th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 3:00 PM. For ticket reservations or for more information, call (323) 960-7738, or online at http://www.Plays411.com/BallYards
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

I WANNA BE A ___ WHEN I GROW UP!

Within the realms of childhood, kids tend to see their world around them by way of the things and places they are exposed to. These exposers tend to be dictated and lead by way of the adults that are part of these kid’s domestic lives, from parents, caregivers, family members, friends of family, or other people that take responsibility for them until they turn the legal age when they become “adults” and can fend off for themselves.

In today’s post modern society, much of what kids are exposed to are based on what technology are made accessible to these kids, where they can see the world around them through a video screen of some sort. Some of these world views are not necessarily real or realistic. But much of it is based upon measurers that are nearly true and accurate that informs these kids on what is real, what is sort-of real, while the rest is up to them to pick and choose.

Younger kids (the pre-”tweeners”) may sense an idea to what’s there, while the “tweens” (age 8 through 13) and the teens (14 and up) are getting a major grasp to the elements that are there at their disposal, giving them a fast notion on what they are going to do among themselves once they hit adult age, and how they can carry on within their personal roles in society.

It’s rather obvious that social media, the element that they take advantage of because for those aged 18 and less, social media was always “there” for their amusement, gets these desires in check, while many of these’s kid’s parents/caretakers/people in charge either arranges encouragement for them, or at least sets guidelines on what they can have, and what they can wait for until their older.

In spite of this social communication available whenever they want and wherever they roam (assuming that there is wifi access found within their roaming spaces), many of these kids can decide what they want to do and how. To place it in classic terms, they still tend to say in more methods than one, “I wanna be a ___ when I grow up!”

If one is on the parent-esque track, chances are that the kids they look over are out of formal schooling for the summer. And in order to keep these kids as busy than ever, there is the option of sending their kids to summer camp. Sure, there are the traditional camps one would image based on the term “summer camp” with the usual visions of placing the kids in question on a plot located in a natural setting where these young’ins can hike, swim, fish, go boating, and other outdoors-y antics. Then there are the so-called “urban” camps that emphases upon a specific activity or skill, from the performing arts (theatre, music, dance, etc.) to something that will will prepare them into adult life, such as a trade that shows promise in the few years ahead.

Perhaps the bigger trends in an activity camp involves something that these kids totally know and love–technology! There are a number of these camps that places point into the STEM notions involving science, technologic aspects, math, and related elements that teaches these kids how to become a whiz, or bigger whiz, on anything that’s internet connected. These forms of camps are placed in an indoor setting (for the most part) and are set upon day camp structures. (No overnight stuff for the most part, unless the camp has a field trip to attend some high tech TED conference that’s rather kid friendly!) These kind of camps, totally nonexistent not so long ago, sets the pace on what these kids want to do or be when they indeed grow up, or at least when they physically grow up!

As this writer can only speak as a former kid but not as a parent, caretaker, or an adult that has others under the age of eighteen within his life, this notion only calls for what is known based upon second and third party status. All that this writer can note is to present in a fuddy-duddy fashion, what it was like as a kid long before I was able to vote, legally operate a car, or to other stuff that was for “grownups” only! (Don’t worry folks! I’ll be brief!)

When yours truly was under the age of consent, I kinda knew what I wanted to be, while at the same time, I had no idea what I desired to place myself within this cold cruel world I was existing in! I was just living in the present time for the present time. There was no “future” per se. The only future I knew of was the stuff I would see in science fiction flicks where, depending on the movie, consisted of space travel, lots of bright colored electronic devices that glowed, and space ships that featured robot voices (usually in a female sounding tone) warning those on board on the space ship that the vessel was going to blow up in three minutes! As for summer camp, or any kind of camp, that was out of the question. My summer activities outside of school did involve technology–watching lots of TV! While other kids would have their parents send them off to Camp Hiawatha or some other camp with an Indian name (“Native American” was a term that didn’t come around until the middle 1990’s, and this antidote occurred long before that time), yours truly parked himself in front of a 12” Sony black & white TV set to catch up on daytime television, mostly in the form of game shows. And since weekday evenings were not “school nights”, I could stay up later turning in to old movies that were on the late-late show. As I became an adolescent, there were a mix of old movies and late night talk shows where everyone from Dick Cavett to Tom Snyder would entertain me with their thought provoking interviews with guests I knew of, and a few I never knew existed.

However, take heed of the kids of today. When they say that they want to be a something or another, they know what they are doing since they can “google”, follow a tweet, or to Snapchat their way to grab the low down of what’s who and where, all without the notion of being in a FOMO state.
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NEWS AND REVIEWS
Theatre 40 of Beverly Hills opens their 2017-18 season of theatre shows with the west coast premier of Arun Lakra’s SEQUENCE, a play that is about genetics, probability, spiritual faith, and good old fashioned dumb luck as witnessed between a pair of material subject experts and the two that follow and question their existence.

The experts on hand are Dr. Guzman (Maria Spassoff) and Theo (Gary Rubenstein). These two start out on a presentation to a group that speaks upon their individual theories. Theo’s speciality is how he created a mathematical succession on fate and luck. He wrote a book on the subject as well as gaining fame on betting massive double-or-nothing amounts over the coin toss on The Super Bowl, winning for twenty years in a row. Dr. Guzman’s is a professor of stem cell research that is near the verge of a major discovery that can assist a massive population over yet to be cured genetic illnesses. Two people in attendance to this lecture hold their separate desires to meet Theo and Dr. Gutman’s over their own issues. Adamson (Crash Buist), a student of Dr. Gutman’s, makes a late night call to her lab in the basement of the university building she studies at. Adamson is confined to a wheelchair due to a childhood illness and a physical accident. Cynthia, baring child, meets Theo at his domain. Both of these young people have something to offer these experts within their elements, while the experts discover that these pupils may hold the key into their ideals, resulting upon an invisible conflict between the secrets of DNA research, the probabilities of how things occur and why, and the aspects of what really comes first? Is it an egg, a chicken, or neither–or both?

This play written by Arun Lakra, a medical physician turned playwright based in Calgary, Alberta, takes upon subjects as fate probabilities, stem cell breakdowns, statistical logic, the faith of God and/or its equivalents, as well as why and how people have all the luck while others don’t, blending all of these components into a tight one-act play that never keeps its pacing to falter. Told in a staggering motion where the four characters only meet as pairs: Dr. Guzman with Adamson, and Theo and Cynthia, this foursome never cross one’s paths although they speak and banter over similar theories and contentions, bringing upon conclusions over what they look upon one another or otherwise. The four players that appear in this stage piece keep the momentum going thanks to Bruce Gray’s stage direction. For some eighty-five minutes, the dialogue and actions will keep the audience into a suspenseful spellbound upon the subject matters as addressed!

Jeff Rack, Theatre 40’s residential set designer, completes a stage set that is relativity simple, consisting of a lab table located on stage left nestled with glass beakers and other items found in science halls, a 20 foot ladder on stage right (it functions as more than a lowly prop), and a floating traditional blackboard where Dr. Guzman, Theo, et. al, illustrate their notions in the same fashion as any professor of knowledge would do in a classroom-type setting.

SEQUENCE discusses a lot within its rather short running time. In spite of performing at slightly under an hour and a half, one won’t feel that time shortchanged the concepts to what they play is all about. In fact, this tense moment’s span only brings every detail into its own perceptive. It even opens a number of debates to ponder upon once the play reaches its conclusion. Not many plays out there can boast that notion, making it as entertaining and informative under one virtual flip of the theater coin!

SEQUENCE, presented by Theatre 40 and performs at the Reuben Cordova Theatre, located within the campus of Beverly Hills High School, 241 South Moreno Drive (off little Santa Monica Blvd.) Beverly Hills, until August 20th. Showtimes are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM.

For ticket reservations or for more information, call (310) 364-0535, or via online at http://www.Theatre40.com
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The Sierre Madre Playhouse presents for their summer showcase, THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES, a musical romp where a quartet of friends in high school perform as their own vocal group at their senior prom, as well as at their high school reunion a decade later.

The scene opens at the 1958 Springfield High School prom. Four “bestie” friends, consisting of Betty Jean (Kate Ponzio), Missy (Afton Quast), Suzy (Kelly Klopocinski), and Cindy Lou (Kelsey Boze), have been asked by their favorite teacher Mr. Lee to perform as the prom’s entertainment as “The Marvelous Wonderettes”, their vocal group that musically achieves in the same musical tones akin to The McGuier Sisters, The Chordettes, and many of the other female vocal groups that dotted the hit parade. Dressed in their full skirted “party” dresses, they sing, dance (or actually, gesture in place), while carrying on through their show with some innocent bickering as noted on stage. (After all, they are high school girls!) Then the scene shifts to their ten year reunion in ‘68. The fashions have changed as they no longer don the frilled party dresses of yesteryear. Each one wears bright patterned trim line outfits with a boa accent while they sing the tunes of that period–the 1960’s! The songs, as well as Betty Jean, et. al., show that they have lost a bit of their innocence, but not as much as one would assume. Now the girls-turned-women have since experienced an adult life, taking some of its ups as well as the downs. In spite of these changes, they sing the tunes that speak for the times in addition with keeping up on their high school age aura as experienced at their humble alma mater.

This showpiece, written and conceived by Roger Bean, is a tribute to the songs of both the 1950’s and 60’s, as well as the notion that “BFFs” can remain such a set synced to a musical soundtrack. The four players featured in this show perform very well within their ensemble, as each one focuses upon their character and personality–both musically and laden with comical overtones. As to the music itself, such songs as Mr. Sandman, Sugartime, Lollipop, and many others are covered from this era. In act two where the reunion take place, the songs get a bit earthy. Said tunes as Rescue Me, Respect, Son of a Preacher Man, and many other added pieces are heard and performed that keeps this program at its lively pace. Robert Marra directs and choreographed this presentation that always maintains a lively persona, even when the foursome are bantering between musical interludes.

Outside of the songs and the four that sing and act within, what also make this presentation enjoyable is what is actually seen on stage. A. Jeffrey Schoenberg’s costuming highlights the era, from the fluffy prom dresses in various shades of pink, yellow, and blue, to the stylized 60‘s-era outfits, showing that these girls have indeed grown up! Jessica Mills’ wig designs add to the period flavor, too! The set design by Jeff Cason consists of a performance floorboard setting, first as a 50’s prom layout, to a ten year reunion place complete with a tinsel lined curtain as its background. (Derek Jones created the lighting design as well!) And Sean Paxton’s musical direction carries on the intervals that these girls/woman harmonize to. The orchestra, set behind the set unseen to its audience, consists of Paxton on keyboards, Mike Flick on bass, Kevin Tiernan on guitar, and Jayden Saldana on percussion.

Roger Bean is a playwright based in the Los Angeles area that is known to create “jukebox musicals”; shows that takes upon a plot and builds that story around existing songs, making the presentation as a new production using familiar tunes that fit among its presence. Currently, a Bean production is currently making its rounds in town, The Andrews Brothers (See review: Vol. 22-No. 28), as well as his latest creation, Honky Tonk Laundry that will perform in Hollywood in August. One can never go wrong with such a musical showcase, and the Sierre Madre’s presentation of THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES fits that bill to its “T”. Older tunes never seem to go out of style as they just get better over time and tide.

THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES, presented by and performs at The Sierre Madre Playhouse, 87 West Sierre Madre Blvd, Sierre Madre, until August 27th. Showtimes are Friday amd Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 2:30 PM. Special Saturday afternoon performances will take place on August 12th, 19th, and 26th at 2:30 PM.

For more details or for ticket reservations, call (626) 355-4318, or via online at http://www.SierreMadrePlayhouse.org
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

IS _____ DYING OR DEAD?

This is a type of headline that’s been appearing in news stories over the past few periods of time when some kind of shift of either doing business of living in some form of domestic lifestyle has changed in the recent times that questions the previous method on how its motions take their course.

Much of this shift of an existence has to do with the ever changing methods on how technology is making things smaller, faster, and cheaper–or a variation thereof. These things can either be in the form of physical objects, or of a system to perform a task or service. This task can be through for monitory gain (i.e. a business), or declared as a basic function, such as consuming video programming. The new techniques are always first raved as the “latest thing” that will become the be-all-to-end-all, and the question if the classic style will become doomed to reach its end cycle of existence.

Since the beginning of the 21st century, this notion of the changing on how things get done has increased in droves. This form of new processes creates an illusion that when somebody or something holds an idea on how to proceed on a method that currently exists or how to create an advanced practice of an element that might be new altogether, then the old way is considered as a plot to send it off to its grave. It doesn’t matter what this thing may be. If the new(er) way is indeed smaller, faster, and cheaper, then that is how it’s going to be! The end!

However, these predictions of “___ is dead! Long live ___!” is far from new. In fact, that battle cry of the new way being born and the old way declared as dead and gone has been around for longer than one may realize. It’s been around for the past 150 years since the period called “the industrial age” captured its foothold in domestic society as recorded for generations to either marvel about, or to scratch their heads with total confusion.

Perhaps the first takehold of these every changing ways in life that involves technology came around in the 19th century when the telegraph made its mark. This form of communication that consisted of dots and dashes clicked on a telegraph key was first thought as how written messages would be soon obsolete. For some sources, perhaps. But for most of the population, no! When the telephone came into the scene not too many years after the telegraph, it was believed that letter writing would come to its end because folks would not compose a letter, but to replace those personal notes with a phone call. That might have been so, but since phone service in those early days were rather expensive for what it was, let alone dicy in terms of reach and quality of transmission, it would not become a standard method of communication until the 1920’s. Not everyone had access to a phone, so letter writing continued.

So did newspapers around that time when that device called “radio” made its entry. Again, radio receivers were not cheap either, so getting news and information wasn’t available to everyone. Besides, newspapers carried photos and illustrations. Radio couldn’t and didn’t. That is, until television finally got its act together after the end of World War II. In spite of the fact that one can see pictures along with its sound, it was better than radio! And with a TV set, one didn’t have to go to the movies for such visual entertainment and thus, gave the movie studios their first real threat. The same went for the theatre operators that showed those moving pictures. No movies, no theaters!

When Sony introduced its Betamax video cassette recorded in the middle 1970’s, along with JVC’s version of the beta format, the video home system (VHS), people would be able to watch movies at home on video cassette, and no longer head off to movie theaters. The VCR’s fate was in place when the digital video disk (DVD) came around at the near end of the 20th century, By the time the 21st century progressed, so did the method of watching movies by something called “ video streaming”, where one can watch movies at home using a system that can duplicate a movie theatre. Mainly, a big screen TV with a booming sound system.

Using the above timeline as a guide, did the new method vs. the old method really cause a “death” of an old medium? That answer is a simple “yes and no”! When radio came about, it didn’t replace newspapers. When TV made its entrance, did radio and the movie industry totally go away? What about the rise of home entertainment via videocassette and DVD? Did it make movie theaters extinct? The same story for streaming movies and later TV shows on electronic devices? Where are the movie theaters and cable TV connections? (Cable TV wasn’t really discussed in this article, but you get the idea!)

Newspapers, radio, television, movies and movie theaters, as well as the afterthought mention of cable are still around to this very day. Granted, their method of service and existence has changed. Some of that change was more for some mediums than others, but they are as a whole still alive and kicking!

It would be totally drastic to have some element become declared as dead in the same method as a person being declared as deceased. A person might be in a state where they are slowly dying, but remains alive nevertheless. When they totally die, they are gone never to return! Radio may no longer be the prime source for entertainment as it was from the 1920’s through the 1960’s with programming was presented in some kind of dramatic method, but its still here! Newspapers may be concentrating on delivering information online, but most, through not all, text based news sources still creates a print version. Movies and the theaters that showcase them are also alive and living as well. Again, they may not be what they were from a generation before, but are still there for public consumption.

So the next time one reads or hears something about a source or medium that is announced as “dead”, take that information for what it is. It’s not totally gone, it’s just changed! It may take a very long time for that element to disappear if at all. By the time it becomes completely extinct, chances are that that method had since been long forgotten, meaning that very few, if anyone at all, will even notice! How many of you out there wonder whatever became of the gas lamp lighters, the seltzer bottle fillers, or the elevator operators that were once part of the domestic landscape? Anyone really cares for not using buggy whips anymore, or washboards to clean your starched shirts and bloomers? Yep, we thought so!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

ANY NIGHT, a play by Daniel Arnold & Medina Hahn that takes its setting upon a relationship between an apartment dweller and its caretaker sprouting within hidden worlds that are imagined or real, makes its Los Angeles premiere as a guest production at the Sacred Fools Theatre in Hollywood.

Marie Fahlgren and Zac Thomas are featured as Anna and Patrick. Anna is a teacher of dance at a nearby studio. Zac is a media tech who maintains an apartment space in an urban location. Anna is interested in moving into an available unit as she attempts to escape a previous relationship. Patrick serves as the landlord by default, as the place is owned by an elderly woman that Patrick has known for much of his life. Upon her settlement at the place, Anna undergoes some flashbacks to previous episodes from her past that serve as nightmares. Patrick, becoming aware of Anna’s flashbacks, makes note to look after her as a measure of concern and safety. At first, the two are distant, but a trust slowly develops that brings them closer. But this form of bonding is not something that appears to settle on the surface. Is Anna discovering a hidden life that she is finally taking grips with? Is Patrick’s concern over her well being moving toward a new level? And does he hold a hidden life that might be real or one that is just as mysterious as Anna’s?

This one act play takes upon a number of issues between two souls that possess personal backgrounds, teetering between tangible and imagery, while attempting to live their moments as a standard couple, blending professional concept (tenant/landlord), personal moments (man/woman/friendship/lovers), and those that speak for a subconscious state of being-past, present, and future. Playwrights Daniel Arnold & Medina Hahn creates a stage abstraction that adds every one of these episodes, never letting the pace and tension to ever settle. The farther the play progresses, the more complex it gets. The pair of performers, Marie Fahlgren and Zac Thomas, are very likable once they step into their characters only for their roles to change. They keep up to their places throughout with a sense of sprit and grace. Between selected sets, they place forward dance movements as choreographed by Erica Gionfriddo that add the only form of calmness between the Anna and Patrick roles. When the two are not involved within the elements of dance, Elizabeth V. Newman’s stage direction take over, making this stage work as fiery, leading up to its climatic conclusions.

In this showcase seen within its ninety minute run are the backdrops as designed by set decorator Vanessa Montano, consisting of a background “wall” comprised of white mesh materials that could represent a mist or cloud, while metal pieces built as a wall or partition are placed on stage left/right representing the units that Anna and Patrick dwell. These pieces may look like junk welded together at first, but hold more presence to such. It’s more of a sense of an urban landscape between the two and their open and subconscious connection they dominate between each other and themselves.

With the title of this work being as ANY NIGHT, one may believe that this play is another romantic comedy one would find through the standard media landscape. That theory is far removed from that concept as it shows more undertaking within what’s being close through physical, emotional, and psychological standpoints as each element serves with equal respect to the other. This is a production that is worth its good look.

ANY NIGHT, presented by The Filigree Theatre and EVN Productions, both of Austin, Texas, performs at The Sacred Fools Theatre space, 1076 Lillian Way at the corner of Lillian Way and Santa Monica Blvd., one block west of Santa Monica Blvd. and Vine Street, Hollywood, until July 30th. Showtimes are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 5:00 PM.
For ticket reservations or for more information, visit http://www.AnyNightAustin.com.
Also visit The Filagree Theatre at http://www.FilagreeTheatre.com, and EVN Productions at http://www.EVNProductionsATX.com

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The Write Act Repertory presents the world premier of Joni Ravenna’s BLINDED, a black comedy of a “blind” man, his headshrinker, and a pair of women undergoing an affair of sorts.

Chris Muto is Donald Stark. When he was a lad of eighteen, he discovered that his mother was having an affair in bed with another person. This lead to a trauma where he lost sight in his eyes, leading to a psychosomatic caused blindness. Many years later as an early-middle aged adult, Donald’s well being has taken its toll. Coming toward his edge, he attempts to “see” a psychologist, Dr. Bob Silveroni (Rico Simonini). Instead of writing more prescriptions for Donald, Dr. Bob has an idea. He requests that Don carry on an affair with his wife Bridget (Cindy Marinangel). The reason for this odd sounding request is because Dr. Bob is having his own affair with his “nurse”, Cheila (Mariyn Sanabria), a Puerto Rican spitfire type. While Donald visits Bridget at her apartment, he plays a role as a French teacher that can see as Bridget doesn’t know of his “illness”. It’s a comical tale of a love triangle that isn’t triangular, square, or any form of shape! It’s a function to cover up one fling with another!

This humorous play by Joni Ravenna takes upon a string of tragic episodes and makes it more of a satirical farce than a joke-upon-joke of a comedy. The cast of four in this play are as just as comical as the material they are working with. Out of the four players that appear in this production, Rico Simonini as Dr. Bob and Marilyn Sanabria stand out comic wise, as Dr. Bob is more of a snide con-artist than a professional headshrinker, while Cheila is a hot-to-trot mucho caliente chica that is coming close to being past her prime–although Cindy Marinangel’s character as Bridget already reached her expiration date–the reason to Dr. Bob’s chili pepper laden affair! (Chris Muto is Donald Stark is amusing, but that’s about it!) T. J. Castronovo directs this comedy with a load of humorous flair that gives the show with what it’s got!

One can’t be wrong with a comedy that is based upon romantic flings that go amuck. BLINDED is one of those examples, as set within a production that’s tight in its running time at around ninety minutes or so, not counting the intermission! That’s enough minutes for all of the hidden secrets to become exposed, leading to its lighter hearted conclusions.

BLINDED, presented by the Write Act Repertory and performs at the BrickHouse Theatre, 10950 Peach Grove Street, one block north of the intersections of Camarillo, Lankershim, and Vineland streets, North Hollywood, until August 13th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM. For ticket reservations and for more information, call (800) 838-3006, or via http://www.BrownPaperTickets.com/event/2993431.
Visit the Write Act Repertory online at http://www.WriteActRepTheatre.org, or through Facebook at http://www.Facebook.com/WriteActRepertory

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

THE TV SOCIAL LANDSCAPE

In a previous issue (Vol. 22-No. 26), this writer composed a column of how the summer season was the time where new and appealing television programming took their “summer vacation”, as well as the viewers associated with watching TV.

Thanks to this post-modern era (i.e. “now”), much of the programming seen exists by getting the word around on a specific series through means outside of basic “word of mouth”. And getting that word across is used through the ever presence of social media where viewers (“fans” in this case), can provide commentary about the show, the episode(s) they looked at, the characters featured and those performers that play them, as well as other bits and pieces they can spit out through a wall post or via worlds under 140 letters.

Platforms as Facebook and Twitter lead the pack when it comes to TV show viewpoints and others that “join the conversation”. And the folks behind Nielsen’s Social Content Ratings bureaus, tallied up the top ten program titles that received the most exposure from the now completed 2016-17 media season. Some 2.8 billion social interactions through Facebook and Twitter were recorded that noted about TV programs that ran through all of the media platforms. This tally includes both scripted television as well as live events such as sport matches and award programs that ran from the beginning or September through the end of May.

AMC’s The Walking Dead received the most mentions from this year, averaging about 2028 interactions per episode. These interactions start when the episode is viewed, and continues long after the episode concluded. (This tally is limited to programs seen within the traditional one installment per week mode, rather than releasing an entire season all at once i.e. streaming via Netflix, Hulu, etc.)

Fox’s Empire falls into second place where it received an average of 860 interactions per episode. The Bachelor, ABC’s long running series is in third place. The program received some 453 interactions when aired during and after. NBC’s biggest hit of the year, the melodrama series This Is Us is in forth place, coming in at 436 posts and tweets. VH1’s Love & Hip-Hop: Atlanta in next in the ranking at 406 per installments.

Rounding out the remaining five is The Voice on NBC, WWE Monday Night Raw on USA is at sixth ranking, followed by NBC’s Saturday Night Live. the generic version of VH1’s Love & Hop Hop, and FX’s American Horror Story: 6 completes the top ten.

As to live events, the 56th Grammy Awards airing on CBS came in first place. ABC’s airing of the 89th Academy Awards came in at number two, fueled by and from the moment where the wrong title was declared the winner for best picture, The Golden Globe Awards on NBC came in next, followed by The Billboard Music Awards on ABC.Dick Clark’s Rockin’ New Year’s Eve also on ABC was next (the only title that wasn’t an awards show). The Primetime Emmy Awards came in at seventh place. And rounding out the remaining three was the Miss Universe pageant, BET’s Hip-Hop Awards, and the 52nd Academy of Country Music Awards on CBS.

Much of this wall posting, tweeting, et. al. was indeed generated by viewers. However, the social media traffic of the programs in question were based on encouragement through the video networks and/or production companies that inviting viewers and fans to do their social media thing. Every one of the titles listed above have program generated places on all of the media platforms were folks can share something to others that might take a glance at it. Generally stating, the more accessible and inviting it is for viewers and/or fans to post, tweet, et. al., the more it will become mentioned within the social media landscapes.

In the next issue, yours truly will give a condensed rundown on how TV shows became part of the rants and raves through pure gossip where friends would tell friends who would tell friends of friends about a program that was worth taking a look at–not necessary finding the program good nor great! It was part of how news got around a natural and organic way. Stay tuned!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

The Glendale Center Theatre presents for their mid-summer showpiece, THE ANDREWS BROTHERS, a jukebox musical set at a military base somewhere in the south Pacific where a USO show almost didn’t happen until a set of brothers stepped in for a trio of performing sisters who share the same name but not necessarily shared the same talents!

It’s 1945. World War II is at its waining years. At a military camp located within the Pacific theater finds three siblings, Patrick (Jason Webb, Lawrence (Patrick Foley), and Max (John David Walles) Andrews, working as stage hands for the USO shows that come in to entertain the boys stationed there. All three wanted to do their part fighting for the cause, but their various ailments made them as “4-F”: military lingo for rejects due to medical conditions. They are getting ready to set up their next show featuring The Andrews Sisters. As a back up in the show is Peggy (Colette Peters), a well known “pin-up” girl whose pictures became part of the servicemen’s “eye candy”. Before long, a cable is received. One of the Andrews Sisters catches a contagious disease. They all must be quarantined and thus, can’t appear! Fast thinking Peggy has a plan. Have the Andrews Brothers play as The Andrews Sisters making the show go on as planned. Since the brothers Andrews knows all of the musical parts, they’re perfect as replacements, assuming nobody ever see them all up close! It’s all connected as doing their duty for the war effort!

This high spirited musical, written and conceived by Roger Bean, is a musical salute to those songs that were on the hit parade while the world was at war. Every tune performed and sung were extracted from this part of the great American songbook when everyone was doing their bit, either on the battlefields or on the home front. The four players in this show have all of their comical talents at bay. There is plenty of comedy and signing to be found within this production, along with its dance steps as well, choreographed, staged, and directed by Orlando Alexander & Danny Michaels. The vocal and musical arrangements by Roger Bean, Michael Broth, and John Newton with Steven Applegate’s transcribed musical direction, brings those tunes from not so long ago back to life. Many are well know from the era, (“Don’t Sit Under The Apple Tree”, “G. I Jive”, etc), and a few that make their comeback for their stage moment! Along with Vicki Conrad’s costume design that depicts the WWII era, it makes it all as a charming showcase for those that recall this period of the 20th century, or for those that learned about it through second hand sources.

This is the first time that the GCT has ever staged this show, and its debut here all works out as it’s just as ideal to see it in its theater-in-the-round position, one of the few stage theatres in the region that can offer such a setting. THE ANDREWS BROTHERS is tight, lively, and a whole lot of fun! That is what stage musicals are really all about, and should be!

THE ANDREWS BROTHERS, presented by and performs at the Glendale Centre Theatre. 324 North Orange Street, Glendale, until August 12th. Showtimes are Friday, and Saturday evenings at 8:00 PM, and Saturday matinees at 3:00 PM. Additional performances take place on Thursday, July 13th and 20th at 8:00 PM, with Sunday matinees performing on July 16th, 23rd, and 30th at 3:00 PM.
For more information and for ticket reservations, call (818) 244-8481, or visit the GCT’s web site at http://www.GlendaleCentreTheatre.com

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THE RABBI’S MISSION, Art Shulman’s new play about the title Rabbi and the two women he juggles in his life, opens at North Hollywood’s T.U. Studios theatre.

Paul Michael Nieman is Rabbi Jacob, or rather, the former Rabbi Jacob. He stepped down from his duties of being the spiritual leader of a local temple and now performs his new duties at a nearby rescue mission. His old friend Al (Stan Mazin) comes to Jacob to ask for some advice. It seems that his adult aged son David (James Haley) is presently involved with a woman who is not of the Jewish persuasion, and wonders what he should do.

Upon meeting this woman, Marci (Shalonda Shaw, alternating with Barika A. Croom), he finds her very charming, knowing that she would be best for David in spite of the different cultures.

Meanwhile, Jacob meets another woman named Theresa (Rebecca Westberg) who was once involved with Jacob after his wife passed on. Although they are both on good terms, it brings a bit of strife. But being the spiritual leader as he was, he can determine the good of what’s going on, balancing this situation.

This play, written and directed by local playwright Art Shulman, performs as a rather light and somewhat humorous soap opera. There aren’t any such plot points that would make it as a heavily laden drama, but much of what is depicted would come across as realistic slices of domestic life. The action is presented within its dialogue, creating a rather talky play. But the talk is more within the realms of deep verbiage rather than idle chatter and thus, what is being expressed flows throughout. There isn’t any padded conversation that some stage plays tend to use when it’s the moment to stretch out a scene or three.

The cast of six players, including Mazin as Al, who is depicted as a “Jewish Cowboy” that rides in the “vild vild west”, is a set that shows their characters as humble. They all depict themselves as people of good that still possess their lighter touches.

Although this play is billed as a comedy, the humor found isn’t of the sitcom variety, meaning that everyone has to spit out a one-liner or three, nor there isn’t a joke told within every turn. It’s presented as more of a comical aspect than anything else.

J. Kent Insay, who appears as Richard, provides the set and lighting design that creates an intimate setting; nothing lavish, but enough to present itself as a detailed stage space.

Art Shulman has created a number of plays that have performed in the region for some twenty years. Many of these plays has been seen and reviewed by this writer over those same years. THE RABBI’S MISSION is a hearty play that is amusing, heartfelt, and will even give one a crash course on basic Judea, even enough for a gentile to understand!

THE RABBI’S MISSION, performs at the T.U. Studios, 10943 Camarillo, east of the intersections of Lankershim, Vineland, and Camarillo, North Hollywood, until August 27th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM. For ticket reservations or for more information, call (818) 285-8699, or via online at http://www.TheRabbisMission.com

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS

As with the traditional start of our fiscal year, we take the time to present our report on how this newsletter series progressed since the beginning of our season to the end of that same period, generally stating between July 1st, 2016 through June 30th of this year.

First and foremost, we have seen circulation up within the previous twelve months. Since July 1st, our traffic through our website has increased by 10%. We are gaining more “hits” through our http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com presence on the web. The increase of traffic was boosted from late November and continued through the spring season. Many of our “hits” came from mobile devices in the form of smartphones and tablets, with the biggest increase came from phone devices. Laptop/desktop access has fallen just a tad and tables remained slightly up. But it appears that having our readers take hold upon us have reached a point where phone devices rule. No matter where you may be in this world, so are we, just as long as those readers has access to an internet connection. And judging upon how the ‘net is the be-all-to-end-all, that’s nearly anywhere and everywhere!

Our traditional newsletter sent via e-mail was held rather steady. Although circulation on that version remained flat, we continue to provide the standard news and reviews that had made us present on and through the web for the past twenty one years.

As to other notions, our parent company, Linear Cycle Productions, recently revamped its website. Anyone that visits up on the web at
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com will discover what we also preform in terms of multimedia applications. This is a service that we have provided from some time, and now this service is being offered to those that hold the strong need to complete. Not only one can find out on what we do, but one can also find links to Accessibly Live Off-Line, and through our presence on our YouTube Channel viewing back episodes of Accessibly Live, a program that was produced in the latter 1980’s and early 1990’s. We are also going through our media archives to post additional episodes of this long running series, as well as a few other surprises! Stay tuned for further developments.

Social media is alive and living. Our Twitter account @ACCESSIBLYLIVE posts when our latest edition hits the streets, and our Facebook page at http://www.Facebook.com/AccessiblyLiveOffLine is gaining new “friends” on a regular basis. Stop in during your next Facebook visit to say “hello”! (And speaking of Facebook, our fake entries we created a few years ago are still on the air with one of them having 5000 “friends”-the maximum limit one can have on Facebook outside of being a “liked” person!)

On a side note, this writer is also involved with a company that became officially established within the previous year: Archive Estate Sales, LLC, a full service provider of the sale and liquidation of household goods and personal effects found in domestic homesteads within the Los Angeles and surrounding areas. For more details on that company, visit http://www.ArchiveEstateSales.com

That is where he have been since our last report. As to where we are going? Of course, we will continue to provide the standard service we create as to what our readers want and desire. This is a farer notion from other sites that carry news that also provide video links to something that is reverent to what’s being reported. Although the larger media companies post video content created by the company in question, most of the other sources post content that came from somewhere else. That’s all good for what that is. But to keep things pure and simple, we place the news that only matters. If we do have access to original content that isn’t necessarily archive material, then we will post such. The moving imagery of older and perhaps “classic” stuff will remain on our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w

  That’s what has been going on within the past year. However, we still welcome your input and encourage everyone to add their comments on this news service, or any other source noted in this report. Drop us a line at Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com, or through AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com. For you spammers out there, send your note(s) to 0602020@gmail.com. Granted, we may not read your reply, but at least you have a place to send your intentions! After all, we do want to grab a piece of that million dollars found in a shoebox near Upper Volta that you are willing to share with us! Who’s going to pass up an offer for free money anyway, hah??
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

Because of the holiday weekend, there are no reviews this issue. Stay tuned for more reviews coming you way within the next few weeks! See you then!
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
https://www.facebook.com/accessiblylive.offline
@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w
(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)
http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com
#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2017 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!