BOYS WILL BE BOYS(?!)

Within the last few years, the on-again-off-again so-called war between men and women has been ranging upon the (social) media landscape, from gender equality, sexual harassment cases popping out from the woodwork, to various political and social movements that sport a title with a hashtag as its first letter in its label. Many of these movements are for real, with others tend to speak for a selected few, if any!

Granted, it’s wise to being some of these issues to the attention to the public at large. Thanks to the powers that the ‘net holds, it’s been a whole lot easier to conduct these viewpoints from what previous generations used to do before. This is both viewed as a good thing and a not-so-good thing, and it holds an ideal side and its weaker end. The good notion (one of many) is that anyone can bring these issues to everyone’s attention. The bad notion (again, one of many) is the fact that anyone can bring these issues to everyone’s attention, wherever the masses want to know about these standards or not.

Between the sides, who has the upper hand in these actions, men or women? It all depends on what the situations speak of and speak for. The woman’s issues have been the “loudest” between the two for various reasons. However, the men have given their backlash of the points that the other side accounts for. Those counterpoints hold a vast range to what they are and the notions that they are expressed. However, there has been related points that are not necessarily of a legal or moral standpoint that these men (and even women) point out. Perhaps they may not necessarily be related, but the social and political climate notes that this is perhaps an ideal time to bring these elements out in the open for what they are all worth.

Marketing groups have been studying the habits of men and women for decades. Ditto for organizations that study the domestic behavior of men and women, boys and girls, guys ‘n gals, and so on. Even though the idea notion is to have everyone stand upon equal ground, these habits and traits have their differences when it comes to age, lifestyle choices, and how they see themselves within the neighborhoods they exist in.

One study (out of many no doubt) focused upon the Millennial and “Gen Z” aged male. To bring the reader up to date, a person of Millennial age range between the birth years of 1981-1995, making these folks in their early twenties through middle-late 30’s. A “Gen Z” person (the name comes from “Generation Z”, far removed from a “Generation X” person that would be born between 1965-1980) was born between 1996-2006, making this group aged from twelve through twenty-two. Anyway, this study as conducted by Youth IQ questioned those between age thirteen through 35 to rate a series of attitudinal statements about how they see themselves and the world around them. Within this report, men from their early 20’s through middle 30’s have shown themselves to be intensely more in step with their emotions than previous and transpired generations. In this report, some 68% of age men agree to the fact that there is nothing wrong with men/guys acting sensitive.
 To express further, three out of five Millennial men admitted they are into food and cooking. This is no real surprise there since outlets as The Food Network brought a number of men as their stars, such as Alton Brown, Bobby Flay, and a host of others. They also express a passion of travel as 63% acknowledged this fact, and not necessarily any form of “adventurous” travel either. They are pleased to see London and Paris for what these places stand for verses going into the backlands to fight alligators along the Amazon river.

But getting into the sensitive stuff, 80% of men stated they do believe in true love, and a little over half noted that their parents (or parent figures) are their best friends. The same amount noted their being spiritual–not necessarily “religious” per se, but fall into a related element of belief. And 60% do agree that it’s very important to support their own social causes through time, financial support, or both. (The same amount of women also believe this fact).

With the good comes the not-so-good. Many of these same men see their gender being challenged. With the sexual harassment stories coming into view, some 25% of men feels that the “world” hates men as a whole. 27% agreed to the notion that is rather difficult to be a man. And 70% of men agreed to the fact that “I am happy that the victims are finally able to come out of the darkness” and “I am happy that these men will no longer be able to use their power to hurt people.”

This reporter also sees a vast difference between the social and emotion differences that men and women tend to hold on to. For instance, this writer participated in a study over the dynamics of friendship that domestic men and women go through. Women tend to have large(r) support groups when it comes through their personal ups and downs ranging from work and employment, family life, martial status, and stage of life and lifestyle. Men, on the other hand, don’t appear to have such support groups placed within an obvious placement. Many churches for instance, both conduct men and woman’s spiritual and ministry groups. The woman’s groups have their bible studies and all, but many of these woman’s groups also acknowledge a sense of happiness with the most common term “laughter”, and the encouragement of friendship. The men’s group (when they do exist) carry their support through emotional (spiritual) strength. When they do have get togethers, it’s usually over BBQ. One men’s ministry group based in a church in central Oklahoma even have their bible study meetings that involve shooting firearms(!)

Of course, these differences will always continue in some method. Some will come along to everyone’s attention, while others will fade away. Personal tastes and wide range viewpoints will dictate what will continue and what will blow itself out. Whatever the case, let the boys be boys and the girls be girls, all within reason! If it remains a war, let the two sides reach an agreement and call a truce. If it’s an issue to correct, make the correct changes. If it’s another point to tweet about, then let it be! And if the toilet seat remains in the “up” or “down” position, then let the other raise or lower the seat for their personal use! ‘Nuff said!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

Theatre 40 of Beverly Hills closes out their 2017-18 season with A.A. Milne’s MR. PIM PASSES BY, a light comedy about and man who makes an announcement of a person assumed to be dead is well alive, and a young lady’s desire to wed her fiancé, an aspiring artist.

The setting is the humble country homestead of Olivia and George Marden (Roslyn Cohn and John Wallace Combs). They receive a visit from Caraway Pim (Jeffrey Winner) where he makes a statement that Olivia’s former spouse is not deceased, but very much alive. Since she is already married to George and has been for some five years, this would mean that she may have two spouses, making her a bigamist. Mr. Pim has been known to be a bit absent minded as he becomes confused with names. Meanwhile, their niece Dinah (Nathalie Rudolph) is engaged to marry Brian Strange (Troy Whitaker, alternating with Jacob Osborne) a budding artist who is into creating cubism paintings. Adding to these episodes is the presence of Aunt Julia (Casey Jones), as well as Ann (Laura Lee Walsh) who serves as on-stage narrator giving the details on what is taking place within the household.

This play was written by Alan Alexander Milne, an author of plays and poetry active in England in the early part of the 20th century. He would be forever known for his later creation of a series of stories for children featuring a stuffed bear named Winnie The Pooh. But before Pooh made its debut in 1925, Milne composed Mr. Pim and was first presented for the stage in 1919. With such British plays from this era, it’s very talky. Every character has a lot to say during each plot progression, even though the title character Mr. Pim has minimal stage time. His character first arrives only to leave, and makes an on-and-off appearance.

In this Theatre 40 production, the setting takes place in the USA (Woodbury, Connecticut), where everyone speaks with American accents. Also, the period these antics takes place is in the present. This contemporary setting gives this play its appeal, even though much of the dialogue lasts longer that one would expect in a stage program that occurs within a domestic setting in the time of “now”. As to the cast, Roslyn Cohn and John Wallace Combs as Olivia and George are center stage in this show as they go through their motions. Nathalie Rudolph as Diane and Troy Whitaker as Brian are the younger pair that perform as proper as the elder leads, just in a youthful stance. And though this play takes place in the present era, these couples, as well as the rest of the cast, are free from using contemporary devices i.e. cell phones. This is just because there was no real need to use anything that can transmit a call, although the Mr. Pim character as performed by Jeffrey Winner, has a desire to hand mail a letter! His character is perhaps the most amusing one of them all. His persona resembles the character performer Marvin Kaplan, who was known to play “nebbish”-types. Although this Mr. Pim isn’t exactly a milquetoast, he does come rather close!

As to what’s seen on stage that has nothing to do with actors delivering their lines, Michele Young provides the costuming that ranges from a casual outfits to Mr. Pim’s grey suit. And Theatre 40’s residential set designer Jeff G. Rack provides the living room space for the “House of Marden” where at center stage is a wide entrance doorway where the drapes will hang. A minor plot point contained has Olivia creating a set of drapes that holds a mid-20th Century pattern to it–a design that wouldn’t become a hit for another thirty or so years from 1919!

MR. PIM PASSES BY can be seen as a curio stage piece of sorts as this play isn’t performed as much due to its amount of dialogue spoken, as well as its length! (Theatre 40 took measures of cutting down this pice from its original three acts down to two without missing any of its continuity.) Whatever the case, the production is charming and witty. The humor may not have any belly laughs, but it’s still pleasant to witness on the Theatre 40 floorboards.

MR. PIM PASSES BY, presented by Theatre 40 and performs at the Reuben Cordova Theatre, located within the campus of Beverly Hills High School, 241 South Moreno Drive (off little Santa Monica Blvd.) Beverly Hills, until June 17th. Showtimes are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM.

For ticket reservations or for more information, call (310) 364-0535, or via online at http://www.Theatre40.org

Theatre 40 has just released its schedule of plays for their 2018-19 season. Complete details on that line-up can be found on the Theatre 40 website.
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West Coast Jewish Theatre presents Deborah Zoe Laufer’s THE LAST SCHWARTZ, a comedy about a dysfunctional family who gathers for the commemoration of the anniversary of their father’s death, and the bickering and revealing of inner secrets that tend to go with such family gatherings.

The Schwartz clan, whose contemporary ancestors maintain a homestead in the Catskill mountains of New York State, comes together to remember the first anniversary of the death of their father Manny. Jewish tradition dictates that a year after someone’s passing, the tombstone to where the deceased is buried is unveiled. The family itself consists of Norma (Cheryl David) her brother Herb (Warren Davis), his spouse Bonnie (Samantha Klein, alternating with Rainbow Underhill), with siblings Simon (David Amito), and Gene (Mike Bash). Each family member holds their own personalities. Norma is the leader of the group that wants to keep family and faith based traditions alive. Herb is a bit more relaxed to Norma’s beliefs. Same goes for Bonnie who was once non-Jewish but later converted, Simon is in frail health with poor eyesight, and can’t tolerate somebody touching him. He keeps to himself studying astrology, always glancing in a telescope. Gene is more into a freewheeling lifestyle. He even brings his girlfriend along, Kia (Natalie Polisson). She is an actress that’s blond, ditzy, and is a Shiksa. (Non-Jewish!) Although she’s glad to be part of the commendation, she really doesn’t understand what’s really going on. With these family members so far apart physically and emotionally, conflicts arises between the fate of the family estate, and those that may (or may not) get anything from it. But the real battle asks if everyone is going to survive, even though the family legacy is at stake.

This one-act comedy written by Deborah Zoe Laufer contains a lot of stereotypical characters that gives this show much of its comical relief. The setting may not appear to be anything of a humorous nature (a traditional Yahrteit), but with a cluster of family members that are on opposite sides, one can get (and receive) plenty of laughs! The cast of six blend well with one another. The person that really steals the show is Natalie Polisson as Kia, the dumb blond Valley girl-type that may be an adult, but holds the mentality (and the body) of a fifteen year old! Her character has plenty of stage time that just gets better each minute that adds quite a bit to the play’s comic relief. And with its single act presence, the one-liners are tight enough where a touch of bittersweet settlement remains. There’s a hint of sadness present, but it still remains as a comedy.

The set the play takes place in the living room of the Schwartz home is designed by Jeff G. Rack and Amanda Sauter. The stage consists of some pleasant yet slightly worn pieces of furnishings, more worn books on a back shelf, and well as an assortment of various knickknacks that makes this home a home. It’s nothing remarkable, yet it’s still home nevertheless!

Directed by Kiff Scholl, THE LAST SCHWARTZ is both comical and somber with an emphasis on the former. With such a play as this one, let’s hope this production won’t become the last of its tribe. It’s too good to fade away!

THE LAST SCHWARTZ, presented by the West Coast Jewish Theatre, and performs at the Edgemar Center for the Arts, 2437 Main Street, Santa Monica, until July 1st. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 3:00 PM. For ticket reservations or for more details, call (310) 392-7327, or online at http://www.Edgemar.org
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BOOK CLUB (Paramount) stars Diane Keaton as Diane, Jane Fonda as Vivian, Candace Burgan as Sharon, and Mary Steenburgan as Carol. These woman living in the Los Angeles region has been meeting on a regular basis for their own book review club, a ritual that’s been going on for some forty plus years. Over time, each one of them has experience their life going different ways. Diana was once married to an accountant and raised a pair of daughters. After her husband passed, she’s making an attempt to live her life alone, although her two now-adult kids want her to move with them to Arizona. Vivian owns a ritzy hotel in Beverly Hills, and still carries on with no commitment romantic flings. Sharon is a federal judge and has been divorced for years. Carol’s marriage to her husband Bruce (Craig T. Nelson) is just there. Although he’s retired, he seems to be interested in fixing an old motorcycle than anything else. Things changes for these seasoned troupe of women when Vivian picks E. L. James’ Fifty Shards of Grey, a novel that is rather kinky in nature. Although anything with the notion of sex were all far from their minds, things begin to change for everyone by having their love lives enhanced through different means.

This comedy is unique than a standard romantic comedy of recent times. It doesn’t involve a single man and woman. It involves four women over the age of sixty, and each one experiences a romantic fling that isn’t a “hook-up”. However, with the plot lines and the cast of players that are featured in this title, it appears that this movie seems to be a relic of a flick released in the 1990’s! The notions depicted were more commonplace some twenty to twenty five years before when light comedy and drama could be used (and gotten away with) in a theatrical film. Most (not all) moves released in today’s landscape that are classified as comical dramas or dramatic comedies are somewhat geared for video and its equivalents. The screenplay by Bill Holderman (who also directs) and Erin Simms contains a number of witty one-liners embedded that are humorous and cute for what they ares as one can experience older women talk and feel about being romantic, if not sexual! The leading women are far from being prudes, but they aren’t horny either!

The cast appearing this film also gives this movie a twenty-five-years-too-late attitude as well. The four leads, Fonda, Burgan, Keaton, and Steenburgan, were in their peak decades before from the 1960‘s through the turn of the 21st century. Its supporting players also come from decades past that include Andy Garcia, Don Johnson, Richard Dreyfuss, and Ed Begly, Jr. playing the suitors (or ex-suiters) of the four leads. The rest of the supporting cast including Alica Silverstone (of Clueless fame), Tommy Dewey, and Katie Aselton, who are just as amusing and are more suitable to see in a current series for the TV/video streaming landscape.

It is rather obvious that this movie’s target audience is females over the age of 35, (perhaps over the age of 45) who don’t seem to hold interest to superhero/action-adventure features, aggressive comedies, or whatever the fare the major studios tend to churn out this time of the year. And since this movie is rated PG-13 for mild cussing and suggested sexual innuendo that is suitable for cable/streaming television, it’s a great flick to see with one’s BFFs. As for the men folk? Well, there will be other movie releases out there loaded with plenty of explosions, gunfire, and young scantly dressed gals in ‘em to take a glance at!

BOOK CLUB is now playing at all of the standard multiplexes nationwide.
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The Angel City Chorale presents ONE WORLD MANY VOICES II, the concert for the early Summer season featuring music and voices that speak (or sing) for the remote parts of the world, performing at Immanuel Presbyterian Church, located within the Koreatown section of Los Angeles.

The concert will consist of a 160 voice chorale of various tones and octaves performing selections that gives musical speech for the nations and sectors of the civilized world. Countries represented ranges from such nations as Ireland, Mexico, Russia, Nepal, Indonesia, Brazil, South Africa, and points in between.

Sue Fink, artistic director of the ACC, will conduct the vocal troupe backed by a thirty-plus piece orchestra performing legacy and contemporary world music. Such selections presented among others, will be Annie Lennox’ A Thousand Beautiful Things, Antonio Carlos Jobim’s Samba Do Aviao, and a new work by friend of the ACC, the Grammy winning composer Christopher Tin. And the chorale will perform a reprise of their own version of Toto’s Africa, that became a hit on ACC’s YouTube channel!

In addition, The Amy Foundation Youth Choir based in Cape Town, South Africa will share the stage with the ACC as their special guests performing their personal take of tunes that celebrate the world and its citizens.

This concert marks a milestone for the ACC as this group celebrates its 25th anniversary this year, founded in 1993 by Sue Fink when it was based at McCabe’s Guitar Shop in Santa Monica with just eighteen singers as members. A quarter century later, this humble clan grew up to where it has grown to where it remains today by keeping their focus intact in dedicated to building community one song at a time!

ONE WORLD MANY VOICES II will take place for two performances only, Saturday, June 2nd and Sunday, June 3rd at 7:00 PM at their newly adapted home, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, 3300 Wilshire Blvd., between Vermont and Normandie Avenues, Los Angeles (90010).

For more information on this event including ticketing details, call (310) 943-9231, or visit online at http://www.AngelCityChorale.com

Visit ACC through their social media outlets via Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AngelCityChorale, YouTube http://www.youtube.com/user/AngelCityChorale, Twitter https://twitter.com/AngelCityChoral and SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/angelcitychorale
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2018 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

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THE NEW FACE OF FACEBOOK!

Back in the not-so-long ago days of the previous decade (the “aughts”), the hazy, crazy, and perhaps lazy days of the internet was taking hold from being a novelty to a way of life. People were now able to do things as send e-mails back and forth, pay their utility bills online, shop for nearly anything from shoes, ships, and ceiling wax (thanks to the rise of Amazon of course), as well as to know about people using social media. In those so-called early days, MySpace.com was the get-go place to do all of that social gathering nonsense, from telling a bit about one’s self through bios and other tales, stating what one likes to ready, watch, or play with (video games, that is), as well as finding others who might share one’s interest. This was the way to become cyber friends, leading to the possibility of becoming “real” friends either through mutual bonds, or even as “hook-up” pals!

Facebook.com, the new(er) kid on the block, did take a while to get its foot in the door. Originally created for those attending school (college mostly), one could only register if one used an e-mail address that ended in “.edu”. This limited a lot of folks that wanted to become a face(book) in the crowd since many folks didn’t have such an address accessible. They were getting their e-mails through their internet service providers such as American Online, Prodigy, CompuServe, as well as local and regional service providers. Then again, MySpace that didn’t have such a restriction, so anyone with a valid email address could join. This was the case for the other rising social media platforms that took nearly anybody as well–real of otherwise.

Facebook eventually changed their methods, allowing the masses to clime on board with or without an “.edu” email address. And indeed they did! Before long, Facebook became the number one place to go for letting anyone and everyone know that you are out there in the cold cruel world. You could do the same stuff as the other social media platforms, as well as using Facebook to find long lost friends, relatives, and others one once associated with that once wound up on a personal “whatever became of…?” list.

So what happend to the other social media platforms? Many of them would up changing their methods by reforming their place on the web. Others simply went out of business by going off the air. Their data they kept on you either wound up on some massive hard drive stored somewhere in the world, or was erased!

And what became of MySpace? News, Incorporated, the name of the parent company of Fox Media, bought the company for a massive amount of money. They were grabbing this portal to make their presence on the web by using it as (among other notions), a cross platform for promoting feature films, as well as TV programs airing on the Fox Network. When Facebook moved way forward, News, Inc. wound up selling the company at a fire sale price. Today, MySpace is using the ideas of promoting indy music bands (its original intention), as well as news about other media based elements. The social media stuff has since taken a backseat since their are other ways to express one’s self online.

In today’s virtual world, Facebook is still the get-go place for social media. However, it’s not the same Facebook as this writer once knew. Back around 2010 or so, we conducted an experiment by creating a number of fake entries. We created a roster of characters (both as male and female), writing up some backgrounds notes on our folks making them as real as they could get. We even had them post pictures from what they were doing, although all of the pictures we used came from various sources from stock photo libraries to this writer’s personal collection.

This experiment was created not only to discover how others would react to these invisible people, but to discover how much personal information we can obtain from these same folks without ever asking for anything. We were not going to prompt anyone with requesting details about themselves. We were going to wait and see what they were willing to note about themselves on their own terms.

Interestingly enough, we were about to find bits and pieces about some personal details, such as birthdays (day, month, and year), address for these folks, and other notions that could be used by others for questionable purposes.

That was a few years ago. Since then, the concerns of privacy changed the attitude that once made Facebook fun and amusing. Many people are now hesitant of listing the community they exist in, as well as placing any of their personal interests and events. A number of these folks used to write original commentary about the events of their lives that had this news service (‘us”) write a weekly column called Tiffi’s Friends Say… that consisted a line or two extracted from the many “friends” of one of our creations, Tiffi Purewhite. Although a few folks still do post these one or two-line commentary notes, others are just using their Facebook presence by posting (or reposting) information that were extracted from news outlets, media sources, or with the cast of authors, promoting their latest book. It’s just turning into another place for reading ads!

If one hasn’t been following the news of late (and it’s rather difficult to avoid since media seems to be everywhere), Facebook is being accused of taking advantage of this data they collected from others on their site and using it to influence elements such as the Brexit movement, the outcome from the 2016 presidential election, another other elements. There is even a boycott of Facebook with yet another campaign (sporting the ever lovin’ hashtag a.k.a. “#”) going around to leave Facebook for good! These elements became a far cry from when this place on the ‘net was the location to tell anyone about your hour/day/week, as well as posting pictures of your vacation/wedding/bat mitzvah/book signing, and other life milestone one may encounter.

As a disclaimer, we do maintain our presence on Facebook at facebook.com/AccessiblyLiveOffLine, as well as through other social media outlets. As to our fake characters, we had since forgotten about a number of these folks, but we still on occasion maintain two; Sherry Dunhurst of Calgary, Alberta, and the for noted Tiffi Purewhyte of Harrisburg, Illinois. (Look ‘em up!) As of this writing, Sherry received the maximum number of friends on her account at 5000. Tiffi has nearly 3000 friends, so you still request friendship or can just visit her to say “hi”. Just don’t expect to hear anything from her–or not right away anyway!

We don’t expect Facebook to ever get back to where they once were when we first discovered them. The ‘net, just like all media, has changed over time for the better or otherwise. Then again, there will be something else going down that will become the next big thing. Just check your social media portals to get the latest scoop. And don’t forget to use the hashtag!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

The Actors Co-op Theater Company of Hollywood closes out their 2017-18 season with VIOLET, a musical tale of a young woman who travels a distant journey seeking a physical healing, and the pair of military men she befriends along the way

The story begins in the Great Smokey Mountain region of western North Carolina where Violet (Claire Adams), a young woman who was born and raised in this region, suffered a hideous accent accident with an ax by having her face cut leaving a massive scar across her forehead and nose. That mishap occurred with when she was thirteen years old. It’s now September, 1964, and as a woman in her middle 20’s, she hears about a TV evangelist who preaches the power of healing. Desperate for getting her face the way it should be, she travels via Greyhound bus to Tulsa, Oklahoma where the preacher’s congregation is based to get herself healed. Along the way, she meets a pair of solders traveling to Ft. Smith, Arkansas: Monty (Morgan West) who is white, and Flick (Jahmaul Bakare), a negro. Flick, passing through an area where segregation fully remains although integration is (supposedly) the law, is aware of the suppression. But through her journey, Violet still pictures flashbacks between her younger self (played by Lily Zager), and her recently deceased father (John Allsop) from her misfortune and the keeping of her long deceased mother’s spirituality alive, still latching on to her catechism book kept from those years before. It’s the setting between a woman who clasps enough faith to become normal once more, and the two fighting men that hold their affection to this lass, regardless of her facial nonconformity.

This show piece with musical score by Jeanine Tesori and book/lyrics by Brian Crawley, takes its plot from the Doris Betts short story The Ugliest Pilgrim, and creates a tuneful saga with the title character that has kept her belief of becoming attractive, along with her self discovery through the aid of her father and the notions he taught her as a girl–such as how to draw cards playing poker in order to teach her ‘rithmetic so she won’t be shortchanged from grocery shopping! Her discovery continues by meeting the pair of Army men and how one of these GI’s Flick, as played by Jahmaul Bakare, encounters a “separate-yet-equal” attitude with others.

The ensemble of performers in this production keeps the pace moving throughout the performance. Its lead player Claire Adams as the elder Violet is very vibrant and is loaded with spark and energy through her vocalization and stage movement. Her “alter ego” character, the young Violet as portrayed by Lily Zager, matches her ability to keep the pace up in equal mode. Her two costars Morgan West and Jahmaul Bakare as Monty and Flick, have the voices that surpasses in what they can perform in this very robust and tight show.

And speaking of “tight”, the stage presentation is set within an intimate performance space, adding to the intimacy of this musical enhancing the “less is more” modus of theater. Julie Hall’s choreography fits in to the performance space allowed, and Richard Israel’s stage direction adds to the flavor. Nicholas Acciani’s set design shows a limited stage set that is minimized with a performance area only showing the seats of the bus Violet travels on along with a few furnishings that notes where the scenes are taking place. Hidden in the back is where its six piece orchestra resides, featuring Ellie Bunker on Violin, Thomas Lovasz on cello, Dominic White on guitar, Manuel Mendoza on bass, Jorge Zuniga on percussion. Taylor Stephenson performs on piano and provides the musical direction.

And adding to the above noted ensemble of cast members are Lori Berg, Benai Boyd, Patrick Cheek, Matthew Podeyn, Emuna Rajkumar, Kevin Shewey, and Lauren Thompson. These players appear in various roles that become part of Violet’s journey of finding the hope and salvation she strongly desires.

VIOLET is a musical whose score harks folk and gospel rhythms, along with contemporary tunes. It’s a solid show and of one that is fresh and original–perhaps a show that its audience can experience for the first time. That impression is refreshing as that stands!

VIOLET, presented by Actors Co-op Theatre Company, performs at The Crossley Theater, located on the campus of Hollywood First Presbyterian Church, 1760 North Gower Street (at Carlos Street), Hollywood, until June 15th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:30 PM. Special Saturday matinees takes place on May 19th and 26th at 2:30 PM. For ticket reservations or for more information, call (323) 462-8460, or through the website. (Below) The Actors Co-Op has just announced their lineup of shows for the 2018-19 season. A complete list of titles and its performance dates can be found at the theater company’s website at http://www.ActorsCoOp.org.
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Buzzworks Theatre Company presents the long awaited revival of Mae West’s SEX, the 1920’s hit comedy about a maiden of working girls that blows town for the Caribbean when things get hot for her while catering to a pair of suitors in the mists of juggling those that range from high society to low lifes, opens at Hollywood’s Hudson Mainstage Theatre.

Andrea Hutchman is Margy LaMont, a well-seasoned working gal that oversees a few other gals in the pleasure-for-hire biz in Montreal, a town where one can get legal hooch. She deals with the local hoods that come and go, if not greasing the palms of the law. Things become rather hot on the wire when an elder society matron attempts to frame her for a crime she didn’t commit. She goes on the lam to Trinidad where she meets Lt. Gregg (Wayne Widerson) an officer of the British Navy that has his own intentions for her. Then there’s Jimmy Stanton (Ryan Phillips), the son of a wealthy plantation owner who’s in town to oversee some of his dad’s spreads. Although both of them fall for the sex pot within her, Margy goes for Jimmy for what he has–not for the charm as Lt. Gregg possess, but for his loot! All it takes is her wits, along with what’s up front and a bit of her ass-ets! It’s not called “sex” for nothing!

This is the play, first presented on the stages of New York, that was written and stared Mae West, who in a short time would be signed by Famous Players (better known as Paramount Pictures) to star in a number of moving pictures that would make her one of the leading gals of comedy of the 1930’s. Even though this play was a hit, the New York City vice squad raided the theatre where West spend a little over a week in the pokey. But that was in the roarin’ 20’s where times were fast and loose, booze was ever flowing (never mind if the stuff wasn’t on the up-and-up legalwize), and the stock market was hotter that a two-dollar “sure win” bet at the track! This piece actually plays out as a genuine Mae West feature film, or at least a pre-code photoplay as there are a number of sexual innuendoes depicted that were titivating then. In today’s post-modern world, it’s somewhat campy. These elements make this show as seen very appealing as it speaks for a time where such visual entertainment vehicles can showcase such bits, while the movies had yet learn how to speak! As to the Buzzworks Theatre Company’s spin, Andrea Hutchman as Margy LaMont plays out her take of Mae West with classic forms of sex appeal. Wayne Wilderson as Lt. Gregg is the dark skinned (“colored”?) English naval officer that holds his suaveness that makes him vaguely English as in “God-Save-The-King” English! The rest of the ensemble that appear in this program feature (as listed in their alphabetical order), Peggy Brown, David Errigo, Lowam Yeas, Andrea Hutchman, Davey Johnson, Kandace Lindsay, Susan Edwards Martin, Ryan Phillips, and Carla Valentine, play multiple roles. Some of these roles last a bit while others just come and go. But that was how this play was created when frantic pacing was the standard method of comedy. Much of the comic stageworks appearing on Broadway then were just as fast such as the ones starring the five Marx Brothers as well as for the other comic teams and acts found on the vaudeville circuit!

When such period plays hosts visual aspects, they are worth a mention! Michael Flannery’s scenic design is rather minimal, but amusing, and Michael Mullen’s costuming that are all of the period it harks for!

Directed by Sirena Irwin, SEX is as fun as…you-know-what! It’s the bee’s knees, the cat’s pajamas, and is anything far removed of a piece of cheese! There are a lot of theatre shows that could be raided by the local vice squad as too much time progressed to make this show worth such a raid. But it’s still sexy and fun! It’s also just as historical as it’s historical! And Mae West couldn’t have said it better to suggest to come up and see her sometime, and that time is now! Crank up the Model T and head on over to good ol’ Hollywood. Better still, take the Red Car! (Hot-Cha!)

SEX, presented by the Buzzworks Theatre Company, performs at the Hudson Mainstage Theatre, 6539 Santa Monica Blvd. (at Hudson Avenue, off Wilcox Place), Hollywood, until June 17th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday evenings at 7:00 PM. Tickets can be obtained online at https://dime.io/events/buzzworks-sex, or at the Hudson Theatre boxoffice.
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2018 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said

A HOLE IN THE BUCKET LIST

The AARP, an organization that caters to those that are aged “50 and better”, has posted a number of articles about suggesting to their their members, or those within the group’s demographic, to experience a number of activities that they may have always wanted to do but never got around to it. These activities has been categorized as one’s “Bucket List”, a roster of events one must take part of before they “kick the bucket”. (i.e. die).

Over time and tide, some people that enter a stage in their life feel that they are getting slowly yet steadily reaching toward their grave. This usually occurs when somebody enters a new “decade” of life. (Reaching the age of 40, 50, and so on.) This method known as a “midlife crisis” tends to be more vocal in men, or so it seems as they tend to showcase it more than women. At least it’s presented in more dramatic means.

This form of episode in one’s life creates a sense of illusion that these folks entering a mature age can see it as a good notion or not. If it’s good, they leave things as they stand. If not, they sense that they must create that list of things to do and witness those elements before they croak. In various sitcoms and in feature films, the midlife crisis is portrayed with the person (again, usually a man) entering into a frantic state where they feel they have to drive that fancy sports car, dump the wife (these midlife crisis men are always married), for somebody much younger and hotter, and/or embark into a journey that rivals any action/adventure film of late, such as fighting alligators along the Amazon River, to parachute from an aircraft flying 10,000 feet above an African jungle, or to do some kind of stunt that people decades younger would never take part in, let alone even consider!

As exciting as it may sound, those bucket list folks never even get around in performing such feats of adventure or excitement. And according to a study created by Stanford University’s School of Medicine recently published in the Journal of Palliative Medicine, shows that there is a pattern in common themes that make up these lists of things to do and take part of before they call it quits for good.

Based upon polling some 3,056 American adults of age, some 78.5% did note that they wanted to travel to some exotic destination, such as Australia, China, or to tour Europe far different that a traditional tourist. (They would like to travel by bike than by tour bus). The same amount of responses wanted to accomplish a personal goal, such as writing a novel, completing a college degree, or competing in a sports related event.

From this point, these is where the so-called “real life” events start to kick in. 51% noted that they wanted to reach a specific milestone in their lives, such as experiencing an anniversary, a birthday, a wedding event, becoming a parent/grandparent, or some other element that is more domestic and realistic.

Nearly a quarter of replies were of a financial nature, such as paying off long term debts from a mortgage, credit card bills, and so on. 16% just wanted to spend more time with friends and family.

So how did those action/adventure antics come in? That ranked in last at 16.7%. It does take some form of bravery to shake off a midlife crisis by learning how to drive a NASCAR-type auto, or to go hang gliding over the White Cliffs of Dover.

Of course, not every person creates a bucket list of this caliber. Some people just want to get their own lives in order that others may tend to do without giving it much thought that has nothing to do with a stage in life. A few folks that are over the age of 55 just want to work in some kind of job that appreciates them for who they are and what they can do. People that are in their 20’s holds this same quest, but not treating it as a “bucket list” activity.

The AARP as a whole does perform a service that is for the good to those that cater to their needs. Their musings that they publish articles on through their website or by way of their publications inform their readers in doing something they have never done before exists as encouragement. It’s a far cry to the notes that once appeared in their magazine that was once called “Modern Maturity”, where it featured cute short stories, poetry stanzas, and such “news” on where to set sail on a cruse ship. Of course, those that AARP cater to in this day and age are the ever lovin’ Baby Boomers that discovered television, rock and roll, and learned to speak their minds to issues on what’s right and not let a government body dictate. They may be up and years, but they do make an effort to live with the times as long as the times and the powers that be allow such! They will continue to fill that to-do list through their own devices.

The rabbit didn’t kick the bucket quite yet! And that’s not all, folks!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

Performing at the Wallis Anneberg Center for the Performing Arts in Beverly Hills is BLUES IN THE NIGHT, a cabert-esque program featuring a selection of tunes that speak for the rhythm and the blues for a trio of women that call of love lost, found, and never were.

The setting is sometime in the 1930’s set within a cheap hotel found on Chicago’s south side. Three “colored” women that don’t call themselves with names dwell at this place. Yvette Cason is ‘The Lady From The Road’. Bryce Charles is ‘The Girl With The Date’, and Paulette Ivory is ‘The Woman Of The World’. They speak for their memories about living in a time where they have seen their love lives come and go. Their men did them good while a few done them wrong. Chester Gregory is called ‘The Man in the Saloon’, but serves as that man who was there on their good side and on their bad. But among this form of lying and loving, with cheating and faithfulness, each one sings about these times with that spark of jumpin’ and jivin’, along with a good dose of the blues to make it all work out in the end!

This program is yet another “jukebox musical” that takes a selection of jazz and R&B numbers from the 1920’s and 30’s, and blends them into a performance that give new life to these tunes (many well known with a few nearly long forgotten) that could fit within today’s landscape. The songs themselves, first made famous by such artists as Duke Ellington, Johnny Mercer, Bessie Smith, and a host of others, is presented in a style that is sparked with smooth and heavy jazz tones from the period where the music was heard and played in smoke filled rooms sparked from filterless cigarettes (or perhaps from tokeing on “wacky weed”), with heavy applications of cheap(er) booze to soak up the joint!

Although the plot of this show isn’t much to speak of, what makes this presentation appealing are the solid cast of four up-front performers. The three women, Yvette Cason, Bryce Charles, and Paulette Ivory, give their heart and soul into this work as they can belt out these tunes with the same effort and emotion that the songwriters had in mind. (Tunes made popular before the rock ‘n roll era stood out for the songs themselves, rather than for the artists that made ‘em famous!) Chester Gregory stands out as a man the represents the dude that was a lover, a player, and the one that did ‘em right and/or wrong! Backing up this group of performers/vocalists is the jazz band that plays out these same song numbers! Lanny Hartley conducts the band in addition to performing on keyboards, with Kevin O’Neal on bass, Randall Wills and Louis Van Taylor on reeds, Lance Lee on percussion, and Ferando Pullum on the horn. Chapman Robers provides the vocal arrangements and musical direction, with orchestration and additional vocal arrangements by Sy Johnson.

As to the visual elements seen on stage, Dana Rebecca Woods provides the costuming that represents the type of outfits donned by those from the R&B period of the 1930‘s. John Lacovelli’s scenic design shows the portions of the rooms these gals lived in at the hotel, complete that a facade consisting of a bland and well worn wall affixed with a hanging sign of the name of the hotel (called “Hotel”) with two street lamps in front. The jazz band performs in the rear of the darken stage area with a sign overhead that reads “Jazz”.

Sheldon Epps, long associated as the artistic director for The Pasadena Playhouse, conceived and directed this program that fits the title to this show. The blues that is called for isn’t anything that’s sad or depressing! In fact, it’s the total opposite! It’s moody, it’s lively, and it rings true to its namesake! Granted, it’s still a jukebox musical. But the rhythm and blues heard throughout comes from a jukebox that could be found in a jive juke joint that plays those records spinning at 78 RPM at a nickel a play–or six plays for a quarter! And that is a play that’s worth its nickel and spin. Sho’ ‘nuff!

BLUES IN THE NIGHT, performs at the Lovelace Studio Theatre within the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts complex, 9390 North Santa Monica Blvd. (between North Canon Drive and North Crescent Drive), Beverly Hills, until May 27th. Showtimes are Tuesday through Sunday nights at 8:00 PM, and Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2:30 PM. No evening show on Sunday, May 27th.

For ticket information, call (310) 746-4000, or via online at http://www.TheWallis.org/Blues
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The Morgan-Wixson Theatre of Santa Monica presents Marc Camoletti’s comic farce BOEING BOEING, a tale of a single man’s effort of juggling a trio of stewardesses for his romantic intentions, and the friend of his that gets mixed up with all of the camaraderie.

Doug Mattingly is Bernard. He’s an American architect living a bachelor in paradise lifestyle in Paris during the swinging 1960’s. He lives with his no-nonsense housemaid Berthe (Maria Pavone) that is quite used to his playing with a group of stewardesses that all serve as his fiancé, through he holds no real intention of marring any of them–let alone that neither one of them are even aware of the others! There’s the blond American Gloria (Chrissa Leigh Anderson) who flies with domestic airline TWA, Gabriella (Sonja Kovacevic) an Italian lass with Alitalia, and Gretchen, a German for Lufthansa. Thanks to Bernard’s careful juggling of each airline’s timetables, these gals meet with him on separate occasions. As one is scheduled to leave to take a flight, another one arrives on cue! While this is going on, Bernard receives a rather unexpected guest, an old buddy of his-Robert (Brian O’Sullivan), a humble yet slightly bumbling guy from America’s Midwest region. Robert is quite surprised of his buddy’s interesting love life, while Bernard just finds it all as part of his routine territory. That is, until each one of these women has their schedules altered thanks to the newer Boeing jets that move on a faster pace, when they arrive nearly at the same time only to complicate things!

This play was written by French playwright Marc Camolette in the early 1960’s during the hight of the “jet-set” methods of traveling by air. The play itself was later translated from the native French into English by Beverly Cross and Francis Evans that kept the same momentum as originally intended, reminiscent to the style of humanistic plays composed by another comic playwright from France, Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, a.k.a. Molière. This means there is plenty of frantic action complete with slapstick, pratfalls, and healthy doses of sexual innuendo that is more titillating in nature than offensive. The Mogan-Wixson version of this production rings true to these facts where the feverish action is non-stop! This form of stage presence is just as funny as the lines spoken by the cast of five. And each character as performed fits their bill down to the letter! Doug Mattingly as Bernard is the solid free-spirit that played each woman he knows as his own, never giving second thoughts to those not with him at that moment. Brian O’Sullivan as Robert is the typical man from the Midwest (Wisconsin) that doesn’t keep this type of lifestyle to where he hails from. (It’s mostly because of the cheese(?) Maria Pavone as Berthe is the housemaid that only does her job with minimal interest to what her employer does with his own life! And the three woman that have their own stage appeals is Chrissa Leigh Anderson (Gloria) as the perky blond, Sonja Kovacevic (Gabriella) as the signorina that holds a bit of Sophia Loren in her, while Kaylee Grace King as Gretchen playing the fräulein that prefers her romance a bit on the adventurous side! These character representations may be viewed as broad stereotypes, but each one is a funny broad stereotype thanks to Branda Lock’s stage direction! Her talents directing the cast on just what to do holds high to the quality upon what’s presented on stage!

And speaking of what is seen on stage, Tristan’s Griffin’s stage set of Bernard’s bachelor pad reeks of mid-century modern touches making this place appealing to keep a balance of rather pretty gals come and go as they fly. And Diana Mann’s costuming also holds within the same spirit of the era, dressing the stewardesses with their flight outfits that match the colors of the airlines they flew for!

Of course, one has to keep in mind that this play was created at a time where such depictions were created for comedy purposes, and was rather acceptable for the period. Today’s world is rather different now where some of the actions seen would not be fitting thanks to so-called political correctness. But with no offense granted to being “PC”, this play is still funny and is a hoot to experience, especially as seen on the Morgan-Wixson stage. And along with the humor, even flying ain’t what is used to be! Yesterday’s stewardesses as known today as “flight attendances”, and are no longer exclusively female! But enjoy the comedy and flavor that the previous generation left for the current crop of theater attendees to experience! It just wants to make one have a great time and may even want one to fly once again–and never mind of living on peanuts and soda pop as one’s in-flight meal! Get ready for take-off and enjoy the flight!

BOEING BOEING, presented by the Morgan-Wixson Theatre Guild, and performs at the Morgan-Wixson Theatre, 2627 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica, until May 27th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM. A special talk back session where the cast and crew discuss their performing as well as taking questions from the audience, occurs after the presentations held on Friday, May 11th, and Sunday, May 20th.

For more information as well as ticket reservations, call (310) 828-7519 or via online at http://www.Morgan-Wixson.org.
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2018 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

CUTTIN’ THE CORD…ALMOST!

Within these pages of this here news service, we have written about how folks that watch television within their homesteads in a given period of time have been changing the way their get their TV programs, usually in the form of obtaining their signals through a coax cable provided through a local cable TV company where they receive hundreds of channels and paying dearly for that privilege. These subscribers didn’t like the cost for such services where at times, their bill would be over $100.00 per month! Its solution is to subscribe to a streaming video service where one would receive an endless number of program titles to view whenever they wanted for a fraction of the cost of a CATV bill! Best of all, one can watch their TV shows through their phones or their electronic pad devices, not just limited to a TV machine!

Many folks decided to jump on the opportunity of getting alternative media by going streaming and to ditch cable. This method of video switcharoo was known as “cord cutting” where their cable TV subscriptions were cancelled, only to subscribe to such services as Hulu, Amazon Prime, HBO-GO, as well as the one that started this all-Nexflix!

Although a number of folks did indeed “cut the cord”, many folks didn’t. They indeed kept their cable service to watch their video entertainment. Some have streaming media at their disposal as well! But in spite of the high fees that cable services provide, as well as companies that use satellite signal transmissions, people have kept their cable services either through choice or through circumstances.

Deloitte Insights, a source that studies and reports on how media and technology affects the domestic public at large, recently conducted a report on the current habits of cable TV users, noting on how they use their cable TV systems and why. The study noted on how people still held on to their cable TV subscriptions (i.e. why didn’t they cut the cord), and the reasons behind staying cabled.

According to the report, a bit more than half (56%) have cable is because they also receive phone and internet services bundled at a reduced rate. If they got these services as separate bills, it would be for a much higher price. Since folks need their phones and internet, they would be willing to get what they really want for less, so cable is considered as a “bonus”. Also, HBO, Showtime, and others premium channels offer their streaming services for a less of a price (if not for free) if they were legit subscribers to a cable service. And without internet access, there would be no streaming! It’s the best of all three worlds.

But for the folks that want cable TV as cable TV, nearly 3/4 (71%) stated they watch because it offers “live” TV. This means that they want to view a live sporting event, news as it breaks (i.e. “breaking news”), or any other program where streaming would not make sense if consumed. Live programming is always preferred compared to getting it “canned”!

In addition, 53% noted that a cable TV company provides digital video recorder devices (DVRs) to capture video content to view later. This is ideal if one wanted to watch their favorite shows through their big screen TV set at a time when it suits fit to watch. This is akin to using a video cassette recorder a few generations ago where one would have to program their VCRs to tape a show for later use. However, one had to have plenty of blank tapes (or tapes they would record over) to view their content. There was an upside to this and its downside. Its upside resulted in a physical copy of the show to keep in a collection, even passing the tape to some other person to view. The downside is the fact that one had to fiddle with the VCR to program the machine to record the show(s) and when. Some folks never got the programming part right (think of flashing clocks that read 12:00), while others didn’t want to mess around with the time on, time off, and channel numbers. DVRs would be programed through simple steps using buttons on a remote that would get the proper settings every time! The downside of DVRs is that you didn’t have a copy to keep on a bookshelf, let alone pass the copy of the program to others. One can download the program from the DVR to a hard drive or as a DVD burn, but that can be too troublesome for some folks. Nevertheless, people still capture their shows to watch later, if at all!

There are other reasons why people want their cable TV, such as “Because I have had it for so long and don’t want to change!” (36%), “I am happy with the value I receive for the cost” (34%), “I do not stream content often, or at all” (28%), and “To access the library of content available for streaming through my pay TV subscription” (21%). Whatever the reason or whatever the case, cable TV is far from being dead, let alone cut! It just ain’t what it used to be!

For the record, Deloitte’s survey was conducted through online means in November of last year among 2,088 polled consumers based in the USA.. The report can be read in its entirety through this link https://www2.deloitte.com/insights/us/en/industry/technology/digital-media-trends-consumption-habits-survey.html

-Enjoy!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

No reviews this week, so please check the next issue for more news and reviews. See you then!
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2018 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

TAKE ME TO THE RIVER

In the category of “We’re not surprised!”, a recent study on the number of minutes spent at an retailer online site and the dollars spent noted that Amazon, the be-all-to-end-all place to purchase goods, surpassed the amount of virtual minutes more than the nine leading companies following.

In the report entitled 2018 State of the U.S. Online Retail Economy as developed by comScore, a leading firm that conducts marketing statistics and data to retailers, stated that Amazon ranked some 22.6 billion minutes online, and two thirds of that time was done through a mobile device. eBay, coming in second place, only generated 6.28 billion virtual minutes. When it come to actually buying things via Amazon, 3/4 of the dollars spend was conducted through a desktop/laptop, vs. a phone.

On a side note, The Harris Poll recently conducted their annual consumer survey of top American based brands. For the past twenty years, Harris conducts a poll asking the public consumer for the one hundred most visible American corporations, and ranking those companies based upon their character in categories such as emotional appeal, products and services, social responsibility, vision and leadership, workplace environment, and financial performance.

For the third year in a row, Amazon took the top spot in those places as it stands for many folks’ place to shop. It’s biggest competitor in terms of what Amazon is involved in came in second: Wegmans Food Markets Inc. (Amazon is in the food market business with its purchase of Whole Foods last year.) And when it comes to traditional retailers, the top ten contain food stores. (For the record, numbers three through ten companies listed included Tesla Motors, Chick-fil-A, The Walt Disney Co., HEB Grocery Company LP, United Parcel Service Inc., Publix Super Markets, Patagonia Inc., and Aldi Inc.)

It’s been noted throughout the media sources that Amazon has been the get-go place to purchase nearly anything and everything. Many retail outlets have been competing with Amazon in terms of selling their goods with the notion of competing for price, selection, and how easy it is to make that buy. Because of this faster-smaller-cheaper way to buy things, folks finally hold the option of getting what they want with minimal effort.

With this new(er) method to shop as well as sell goods, many physical retailers have been going through their backlash in keeping their businesses up to date, if not totally afloat. Over hither and yon, many smaller retailers from those ever loving “mom and pop” operations, to stores that have been part of their community for generations, have been seeing their business move from the local approach to those competing with places that sell from cyberspace. Even the larger places have been experiencing changes in their methods of conducting business. They have been seeing interested (and potential) customers come in to look at a specific item. The said prospective person views the device, perhaps play with the functions that this unit can do, and even get a salesperson to tell the customer on how this unit can do its job. When it’s time to close the deal, the customer will say something to the effect of “No thanks! Just looking!”, only to leave the retailer and see if the same thing is available online somewhere else where it can be obtained at a lower cost. This method is called “showrooming” in the retail business, and many of these retailers don’t care to experience this method of the way goods are sold. It’s almost a reverse “bait-and-switch”.

Nowadays, retailer store that can swing it, have a “meet-or-beat” policy where if one can find the same item online at a specific cost, the retailer will match that price. And there is no shipping charges added to speak of, since the unit is given to the buyer right on the spot! Sometimes, one has to go to the physical store to complete the transaction, although some retailers offer this meet-or-beat offer online.

What about those mom-and-pop outlets that may still exist? Well, many of them have felt how their business has changed. First came the big box retailers that sprang up in the 1990’s, where these stores resembled giant warehouses. They could offer dozens of the same item. But unless one knows what they desire and where to find it at these places, it can be frustrating to get what the customer wants.

When online shopping took off around the turn of the 21st century, the bigger outlets attempted to get on the online shopping frenzy, while the smaller outlets were left in the dust. Although many of these small businesses did fail, many kept their places going, but only through a thread.

Today, the bigger outlets ranging from Sears to Toys R Us have been existing as shadows of their former selves, either changing their method of staying current, or in the case of Toys R Us, nearly calling it quits! Walmart, the biggest retailer in the nation, was once considered to be the “evil giant” by coming in to a community and taking away the business from smaller outlets in the same area. Some of these fights were in the form of not allowing Walmart in opening a store that may pose as a threat to the community. Some of these battles were successful, and others were failures. But the battle doesn’t seem to be Walmart vs. small business. It’s more Walmart vs. Amazon. And one can’t chase a retailer away that doesn’t have physical stores so to speak by telling Amazon to get out of town because they are not “in town”! But one can still buy from them at a 7/24/365 time range, even shopping at Amazon in the nude if the mood calls for such!

Only time and tide will predict the fate of these outlets in terms of selling goods as well as making an impact to the community that they do business in, such as employment opportunities, access to quality products, and so on. Right now, perhaps the biggest threat that is arriving within the horizon is what’s called “artificial intelligence” a.k.a “A.I.” a.k.a. “robots”. Already, some retailers such as the for noted WalMart has robot check out stands where one can grab their goods through a self serve scanner, and pay for said goods via a credit card or inserting cash through as slot. It’s almost like buying online without going online! But A.I. can’t replace everything, including what this writer does. But that’s for another topic and for another issue.
(*BEEP*). This is a recording! (*BEEP*)
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

Performing for a limited run at the Hudson Mainstage Theatre in Hollywood is Veronica Loving’s FEEDING A MONSTER, a drama about a father who tries to do well for his own, takes advantage of his stepdaughter that leads toward a breakdown of a family and the lives it takes with it.

Occurring within the recent past, the setting is the home of Veronica Loving (Fayley Patrice) and her husband Kenneth (Dejaun Christopher). They are a middle class African American couple living a rather comfortable life in Pasadena. Kenneth was once a professional ball player, but presently is a construction worker. Veronica is in the health care field working as a RN. They have a daughter Jazzmine (Doyin Domingo) who is of college age and was born to Veronica from another father. Kenneth loves and respects his daughter as his own, and is well liked by Veronica co-worker and BFF Rhea (Conisha Wade Dorsey). Jazzmine, or “Jazz” as she is called, has a boyfriend of her own, Eli (Andre Jefferson). Kenneth tries to do well for his clan, even attempting to get started in his own construction firm. All goes well as they stand, until one moment when Kenneth is looking over Jazz when Veronica is out of town attending a nurses convention. The two engage in drinking, where Jazz eventually passes out. Kenneth, also in his drunken state, considers a motive for Jazz that does leads toward a tragic consequence.

This play written by Veronica Loving (with Ladarrion Williams), is based upon an actual episode experienced by the “real” Veronica Loving that hold many similar plot points to what she experienced related to what is depicted on stage. At first, the play starts out as light comedy akin to a sitcom that features an African American cast. As the play (and plot) progresses, the sense of comedy turns toward tense drama. The subject on hand dictates this mood swing. When it is of a comic stage, the dialogue is sharp, sassy, and somewhat hip as it reflects upon the life of post-modern African American characters. And yes, these same characters at times do refer to each other with the “N” word, but as in passing, not as anything in a derogatory state. This form of dictation between the characters make this play as something out of reality as the hipness is all too common, and gives this stage piece a sense of depth.

Art Evans directs this production that never becomes preachy. It just depicts how a random act can progress between a stage of connection and a stage of life long tragedy.

FEEDING A MONSTER, performs at the Hudson Mainstage Theatre, 6539 Santa Monica Blvd. (at Wilcox), Hollywood, until April 29th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoon at 3:00 PM. Tickets can be obtained online at https://www.plays411.com/newsite/show/play_info.asp?show_id=4785
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2018 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

“REAL” ENTERTAINMENT

Not too long ago, a marketing study was conducted that focused upon how entertainment was fundamental to one’s health and happiness, as well as being key in shaping one’s identity. 

This report, called Truth About Entertainment, took a survey based on some 6000 replies from those residing in the USA, as well as in Asian nations as Japan and China that asked upon their views on what entertains them through media (television, movies, etc.), music through recordings and/or through musical artists, as well as books and sporting events. Through these mediums, the report targeted on how a person seeks an identity through their entertainment values, as well as how such amusement plays a key role through their personal health, be it as physical and/or emotional, and the pleasure they obtain.

Some of the results found within this study shows that nearly three quarters (74%) served as an influence to the person they presently are, while 60% noted that this same interest influenced their choice of a domestic partner. Also, some 66% of Americans would want to preserve live entertainment vs. some related source that was delivered through electronic means, such as a video based streaming service. And the more they are using a “canned” form of entertainment, they more they desire some exposure of live entertainment. 80% of Chinese agree on this notion while American stated this fact at 75%. (Folks at Japan only agreed to this notice at 57%.) However, more than half of all groups could not recall the last time they experience some form of live entertainment! But whatever the case, 80% of the Chinese and Americans did agree that “without entertainment in my life, I wouldn’t be me!” (This level runs at 70% in Japan.)

Some of these facts as noted above came from a filing conducted by the advertising agency McCann as a commissioned study by MGM Resorts International, one of the largest (if not the largest) conglomerates that operate casinos. And McCann is the agency that works with MGM Resorts to advertise their facilities that functions wherever gambling is allowed.

There is some truth connected between the notion on how the choice of entertainment and one’s personal identity and well being holds true through their personal connections.

First, being a “fan” of some kind of musical group, TV series, or feature film picks ring true to one’s personal standing. It’s a moment where a selection of a form of media- based amusement places a stand in one’s life, especially if that same person is within a group or gathering of said followers. To present a basic idea to this fact, this writer usually attends the annual Turner Classic Film Festival that takes place every spring in Hollywood. (This year, the TCM Film Fest occurs from April 26th through the 29th. Details can be found at http://filmfestival.tcm.com/). Throughout the fest, I have encountered score of folks that holds this passion to see feature films from not so long ago on the big screen with a group of others who just adore movies of this type. Some attend with the sense of amusement, while others are present as their be-all-to-end-all journey. (Many folks take their spring break vacations from where they came from to travel to good ol’ Hollywood, USA just to only watch movies!) The same goes for fans of comic-based entertainment to travel to many of the “comic cons” (the generic term for a “comic book convention”) that takes place in locations throughout the country. Some attend the regional fests, while others use San Diego as their mecca to hit the San Diego ComicCon, perhaps the biggest one of them all! This writer never had the opportunity to attend any of the SDCC events, but the media always reports upon not only of the activities that took place, but on the people that attend! Many don costumes of characters found in comic book series, graphic novels, manga titles, and so on. (These folks are in “costume play”, or ‘cosplay” for short.) Their identity is refined as they attend these events in either through a simple method, or going out in full force. (More details on the San Diego Comic Con can be found at https://www.comic-con.org.)

Of course, movies and comic book fodder are just two of many forms of entertainment that reflect upon who one is and where they stand within their domestic world in terms of interest, knowledge, and metal state of mind. Granted, not every person who leans toward a specific form of amusement holds their real identity within this realm, but it still exists in some from of being. On the opposite side of these points, many who was once a fan of something or another may have had their interests shift over time and tide. A person that once held an interest in the writings of an author and/or fiction genre at a younger age might have discovered that their interest in the subject matter was great at that moment, but eventually lost interest. Their identity to those works fell off the wayside. It may return one day, or it may never come back again!

In this day and age, finding one’s identity and one’s entertainment will only expand in terms of amount and access to the goods. For movie fans, one can now catch a feature on a TV device that sits within a living room or den space in one’s home, on a laptop carried anyplace that has internet access, or on a phone that sits in one’s pocket or pocketbook. (Don’t forget the traditional movie houses!) The same goes for music lovers discovering their tunes through their computer machines, smartphones, or even through the radio! The list goes on and onward.

So take a stand to who one is, where they are at, and what kind of video programs they are going to stream through their over-the-top TV-esque channel systems. As Popeye would say, “I yam what I yam and that’s all what I yam”! Just ask anyone who are fans of comic strips, animation, or points in between! They will lay it on ya!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

Performing at Hollywood’s Lounge Theatre is the west coast premier of Jeff Tabnick’s THE INTIMACY EFFECT, a play that takes two couples attending a dinner party only to have their event turn itself for its worst with the introduction of a stranger delivering an announcement about a future delivery of sorts.

Tim Fannon plays Matt Appel. Toni Christopher is his wife Amy. Matt’s invited his bother Doug (Robert Bella) and his spouse Merrily (Jordana Oberman) to their apartment to celebrate his birthday. Although this was meant to be a festive occasion, things begin on the wrong track. Amy’s going through the effect of a traumatic incident that occurred the day before. Matt still makes an attempt to bring the spirits up in spite of the incident. The conversations that go between this foursome speak for personal affairs and exploits that range between politics, social issues, their six individual lives, as well as the traumatic incident in question from the day beforehand where a strange woman bearing child named Jennifer (Cassidy Schiltz) showed up from out of the blue. Her arrival bares a deep secret that can change things for all, not necessarily for the better. This so-called birthday/dinner party starts off as flat, and may become a sign for the future between all.

This one act play written by Jeff Tabnick can be labeled as a dramatic downer. The characters express some form of grief, uncertainty, and a sense that things are not going very well and will only become driving toward the worst. This method of moodiness brings the best drama-wise where the four bicker with one another as well as to themselves, expressing their thoughts showing off on how they really feel. These inner thoughts are not as hidden as the bitter truths become more exposed.

This cast of characters as performed by this troupe of five players are the kind one would find in lighter TV comedies, giving a sense of familiar territory that the theater audience would expect. Play director Eric Hunicutt packs enough emotional drama that keeps the pace going (even at its depressing points) for its full seventy-five minute running time.

Michael Fitzgerald’s set design of Amy and Matt’s apartment shows a rather tight yet cozy space with enough hints of their never-seen young daughter and her personal effects such as storybooks, drawings, and photos, giving the illusion of a content young(er) family, even though Matt’s birthday commemorates the halfway point of life.

The only element of intimacy ever depicted in this play is the real lack of closeness the two couples share. It’s a stage play for the emotional ties between middle class hetrosexual couples living in today’s post-modern age.

THE INTIMACY EFFECT, presented by JTK Productions and performs at the Lounge Theatre, 6201 Santa Monica Blvd. (at El Centro Avenue, one block east of Vine Street), Hollywood, until May 6th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday evenings at 7:00 PM. For ticket reservations, call (800) 838-3006, or via online at http://TheIntimacyEffect.BrownPaperTickets.com
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Lois Robbins’ solo show L.O.V.E.R., a coming of age saga of Lois’ sex lives, makes its world premier at the Zephyr Theatre located in the Fairfax district of Los Angeles.

In her performance, Lois tells about how she discovered the joys of sex at a young age. Not with anyone human, but through household furnishings as well as the washing machine that vibrated within the spin mode, making Lois doing her own “spinning” in the right places. As she grew up, she discovered boys, later men, through academic schooling and through the many schools of life. She found the loves in her life, only to leave them behind, as well as having herself left behind. She had a career to take care of–acting of course, as well as going through her own situations both as emotional and physical. But whatever occurred, Lois survived them all, enough to tell her pubic that she became the lover (and l.o.v.e.r.) that she is.

Lois tells her mini epic that consists of a pleasant blend of comedy and drama with enough doses of tragic episodes that shows more truthful emotion than being another stage of personal depression. She also displays enough honesty that makes her own self character appealing. (She fully admits that she “played with herself” with the assistance of couch arms and the family Maytag!) Through her sixty minute presentation, she thrusts herself (pun?) from childhood, adolescence, college age student, young adult, wife and mother, and to her level of existence where her fellow “girlfriends” admit they have/had it all when it comes to good ol’ sex! She also confesses that a little creative license was added for flavor. Then again, she has enough stories to tell, even if some of those tales are “fish stories”!

Although Lois is the star of her own show, there are other visual notions to make note of. Pete Hickok’s scenic stage design consists of a post-modern retro-esque club chair set on stage right, a lucite and chrome upright bar on stage left, and a set of three panels hanging along the rear of the performing area that are rectangular in shape. These panels are used to project moving imagery (as designed by Nick Santiago) that depicts Lois’ phases in life as physical points and emotional milestones. Kate Bergh’s costuming shows Lois dressed in a beige colored smooth fitting outfit that is stylish for a middle aged person as herself.

Recall the fact that Lois has been around the block a number of times. That is what makes this show very humorous, dramatic, and even somber as she has traveled a great journey. Sonia Sebastian directs this program that gives Lois the talent and respect she desires. She may have had her flings for came for the good or otherwise, but she wound up as the L.O.V.E.R. she desired to be. Then again, there is always the ol’ Kenmore washing those duds in suds on “full load”!

L.O.V.E.R., written and performed by Lois Robbins and presented by Theatre Planners, performs at The Zephyr Theatre, 7456 Melrose Avenue (between Gardner and Vista Streets), Los Angeles, until May 12th. Showtimes are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM. For reservations or for more information, call (323) 960-5770, or via online at http://www.Plays411.com/Lover
Visit the show via Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/LoverPlay

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2018 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

The above noted headline is perhaps one of many oft-quoted quotes that came from the pen (or whatever was used to jot down these words way back when) of William Shakespeare, one of the greatest playwrights within the English speaking world to compose plays. His plays were so great that somewhere in this world right this very minute, some theater company is presenting one of his works or some form of variation of his pieces. This is an impressive track record because not only that his creations hold plenty of drama and comedy, but all of his works are in the public domain! As it’s been stated many a time before (not from Willie however), that dead men collect no royalties!

But this article isn’t about The Bard, playwrights, or even about the theater as a whole. It’s about how people receive their names and the source(es) responsible for the naming rights. Generally speaking (or writing in this case), it’s about how parents and/or caretakers name their kids that are born into their domestic family-style domains.

Even since people were first known as something to be referred by, people were given labels as a method of identity-a label that would separate person “A” from person “B”. Depending on where in the world they existed as well as what culture they were extracted from, folks obtain names that would be kept for life, either as intended or otherwise. This form of naming would consist of a first name, perhaps a middle name or series of “middle names”, and a last name or surname that would identify the family, tribe, group, or other body that assisted in where the person came from–physically or through placement. That first name can give some form of ID that would distinguish the person’s gender. The same can also go for the middle name. The last name, or final label, gives the source of the family, troupe, or sect to the person in question. Middle names can also be used for lineage as well!

Not to get too far off the topic that this writer desires to discuss within this article, we are going to stick to the current domestic society where this news service originates–the USA, since most of our readers hail from this area in addition to the writer. So let’s proceed.

Not too long ago, a notice appeared within the pages of a church bulletin. This church, located in another part of the nation that is outside of the confines of Los Angeles, gave notice of a birth. The notice read…

Bugh Thomas Ray was born on February 12th. Bugh is the son of Ben and Emily
Ray, the grandson of Cindy Ray, and the brother of Julia, Jack, and Anna.
Congratulations!!

First and foremost, we give our wholesome congrads to Ben and Emily for the birth to their son. However, one element remains. How does one pronounce the name of the kid? Is it “bug”, “burgh”, or perhaps something else?

This writer is not aware of the people stated within the birth notice, so yours truly falls into a neutral stance. The real question to this situation is one that could present some thought. Why did Ben and Emily name their child “Bugh”? Is this name extracted from some source that is part of a family legacy? Is the name one of those monikers of old that have since fallen out of popularity over the many centuries and is seeking a revival? Is this label part of another title that holds some other significance? Or are these parents just trying to become hip and trendy in naming their kid?

The method of names over the years has its tendencies of becoming popular at one moment, only to have its popularity fade over time and tide. This can be due to a number of reasons based upon the parents/caregivers, how the family’s legacy was built, or perhaps whatever the popular fads were of the era.

The Social Security Administration, that government agency that dishes out those nine digit numbers that every citizen has that until recently, had minimum value to those outside of the person’s realm, ranks the most used names in terms of male and female as assigned within a given decade. This ranking is perhaps the most accurate measure of who was named what and how common that name was used within that stretch of the period.

To give an example, in the 1950’s, perhaps the most popular and sought over decade of the 20th century, the top five names given to newly born boys and girls were of this order: (Boys): James, Michael, Robert, John, and David. (Girls): Mary, Linda, Patricia, Susan, and Deborah. Two decades later in the 1970’s, the names that were in the hit parade were Michael, Christopher, Jason, David and James for the boys, and Jennifer, Amy, Melissa, Michelle, and Kimberly for the girls.

It’s not too surprising that this same writer known of a number people who correspond with these names and the decade that they were born in. Although some names didn’t necessarily make the top five, the names ranked by the SSA do jive with the other names that were popular at that moment.

And if anyone is interested to know what are the current top five names in this decade (the ‘10s), those names are Jacob, Noah, Mason, William, and Liam for the boys, and Emma, Sophia, Olivia, Isabella, and Ava for the girls. Keep in mind that this only covers the years 2010 through 2016. Granted that only three more years need to be tallied. (’17 through ’19). But it’s not too likely that this ranking order would be modified by the time the 20’s come roaring in again!

And for the record, the name “Bugh” didn’t list anywhere within the survey of 200. Interestingly enough, some unique names were listed, including (but not limited to), such monikers as Ryker, Hayden, Gage, Ximena, Tanner, Jace, Maddox, Londyn, and Brooklynn–with two “n”s! We will let you the reader guess the proper sex that this names are connected with! ‘Nuff said!
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NEWS AND REVIEWS

PLAY ON!, Rick Abbot’s comedy about a theatre troupe attempting to stage a murder mystery play, opens as the second show for Theatre Palisades’ 2018 calendar season.

Within the realms of a community theater, a new murder mystery entitled A Murder Most Foul, written by community theater member Phyllis Montague (Cindy Pearl) is set to perform. It’s a few days before the opening, and the production is attempting to get under way. The AMMF cast consists of Henry Benish (Michael Bernstein), playing the role of “Lord Dudley”, Polly Benish (Marina Tidwell), playing “Lady Margaret”, Marla “Smitty” Smith (Keely O’Sullivan, alternating with Bella Dixon), appears as “Doris the Maid”, Saul Watson (Richard Conolly), as “Dr. Rex Forbes”, Billy Carewe (Robert Watson), as “Stephen Sellers”, and Violet Imbry (Lauren Chapman) as “Diana Lassiter”. Geraldine “Gerry” Dunbar (Catherine Rahm) is set to direct this stage program, but there are other notions to deal with. The stage manager Aggie Manvall (Ria Parody Erlich) attempts to get things correct, and Louise Pearly (Sue Hardie) who controls the technical aspects, is somewhat getting the sound effects to work on cue. When things go wrong in this production (including the playwright making last minute revisions at a near moment’s notice), they somehow do succeed while applying upon the usual comical antics!

This production presented by Theatre Palisades, programs a ‘play-within-a-play’ play that shows how a theater company tries their best (or lesser best) to get a show going. Although their program is a murder mystery, it’s a rather talky one! But that isn’t the issue here. Rick Abbot, who penned this stage comedy, makes the same effort in keeping this show going akin to its characters and their situations. With the efforts of the set of actors and behind the scene folks as played by a selection of actors, it creates this Theatre Palisades show as an endeavor that is rather amusing. Sherry Coon, the “real” director here, brings the cast afloat toward their comical efforts. With the aid of a set of “real” tech people with Susan Stangl on audio design, Sherman Wayne’s stage design, and June Lissandrello’s costuming (featuring “English Murder Mystery”-style outfits for the actors playing actors), one has a pleasant comedy about theater at its nearly-as finest, but never gets there! However, the theater brood do rise to the occasion!

Theatre Palisades is one of these charming community theaters within the region that presents their plays and musical with charm, appeal, and grace. It’s one of these little gems that showcases live stage programs found within a cozy community setting. And in this day and age of existing in an overly wired world, it’s always a treat to experience entertainment the classic way–live and in person! It’s a concept that still works well with a real audience that reacts in-person to what’s seen and depicted on an intimate stage!

PLAY ON!, presented by Theater Palisades, performs at the Pierson Playhouse, 941 Temescal Canyon Road (off Sunset Blvd.), Pacific Palisades, until May 13th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM.
For more information and for ticket reservations, call (310) 454-1970, or via online at http://www.TheatrePalisades.com

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Skypilot Theatre presents Craig Jesson’s MIDNIGHT REQUISITION, a drama about three siblings that gather for their father’s funeral, and their mother who betrayed them all many years before, performs at the the Hollywood Theatre of Arts in Hollywood.

A trio of sisters consisting of Heather (Kelsey Risher), Ashley a.k.a. “Ash” (Laura Walker), and Grey (Serena Anis) meet to attend the wake and funeral of their father David (Morry Schorr). Although these siblings have already established their lives on their own, they do make an effort to rebond with one another. Joining this troupe is their mother Maggie (Michelle Begley). Maggie was the former spouse of David, and was the one who started the divorce process, taking off and leaving the kids to David’s care. She also arrives with her current partner Ernesto (Gerry Del Sol), who hails from Latin America and is involved in a number of business deals. In this trying time, Maggie also attempts to rebond with the family she long left behind. But through time and tide, they begin to understand of their late father’s life from the times he experienced while in the military service back in the 1960’s, to getting involved with possible business deals with her ex-wife’s husband. It’s the type of family ties that were undone a generation ago with a vague change of being retied.

This new play by Craig Jessen takes the elements of families broken and adds plenty of established twists between each character. The dialogue is sharp, upfront, and never holds back. The six players add to this effort as seen throughout this performance. James Carey directs this piece that has enough humor to where the drama never becomes too heavy, and is far from anything that’s sappy!

Director Carry also designs the stage set that only consists of a few pieces of furnishings (mostly as a series of floating tables and chairs) minus any backdrop. This method of less-is-more theater works quite well to such a stage piece and the performances that go along with it.

Skypilot Theatre chooses their plays by selecting playwrights that work and are based within the Los Angeles region, giving an opportunity for those involved within the theater structure to showcase their talents. Granted, L.A. may not necessarily be associated with theater in the same sense as New York, but the quality and aptitude for the stage scene is indeed present. This play is a prime example of that noted stage flair!

MIDNIGHT REQUISITION, presented by Skypilot Theater, and performs at the Arena Stage, Hollywood’s Theater of Arts, 1625 North Las Palmas Avenue, (off Hollywood Blvd., adjacent to the Egyptian Theater), Hollywood, until April 29th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 2:00 PM. Tickets can be obtained through Brown Paper Tickets at http://www.BrownPaperTickets.com/event/3368581. Visit Skypilot Theatre online at http://www.SkypilotTheatre.com
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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE
is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com
AccessiblyLiveOffLine@gmail.com
Details@LinearCycleProductions.com
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#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2018 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers, and not necessarily of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!