AMERICA’S BASEMENT

There is a website called Quora.com, were folks can ask questions on various topics, and perhaps somebody out in cyberspace land will take the time to answer that question. The form of questions vary and deal with topics ranging from cooking (“What’s the best way to boil noodles?”) to history (“Did the James Gang attempt to rob a back in the wild west only to come out empty handed”?) to true crime. (What was the most difficult murder case that was ever solved”?)

One post that covers none of the above topics was Why is Florida called “America’s Basement?”. That is a phrase that this writer never heard of, but many of Quora’s readers and subscribers have. And one reader even went through the notion to present a rather complete answer as posted below: 

…Two things happen in basements. Either you store stuff you aren’t particularly interested in keeping up with your nicer things, or it’s where you go to have the type of fun you don’t have in certain company.

Both are very relatable to Florida. Between old people and their less than stellar offspring, Florida has become a hot spot for our cast offs. The existence of adult only subdivisions and trailer parks has created an ideal place for sex offenders to reside as well. There are very few places that are far enough away from schools or playgrounds for these people to go. Florida has an abundance of opportunities to live in relative peace.

Florida has Disney, beaches and a wide variety of opportunities for recreation. I can remember my friends basement up north. It was the home to the “rumpus room.” We would watch videos, mostly Disney. His dad had an awesome model railroad down there.

Florida is also strip club central. Las Vegas is a virtual Puritan colony compared to Tampa. I would wager that there are more strippers in Florida than people in Las Vegas. When we got older, my friend’s basement went from home of innocent good times to a den of iniquity. We watched dirty movies (his dad also had a prodigious collection stashed among the hills of of his tiny railroad kingdom.) We brought girls down there in hopes that they were of low moral turpitude. We rarely got past second base, but beggars can’t be choosers.

If you’ve ever watched That 70s Show, know that the basement was where the friends explored the philosophy of life, assisted by the devil’s spinach. Guess where the point of entry for a great deal of our drugs is? If you said Florida, you’d be right. Getting high in the basement is synonymous with adolescence and early adulthood.

So there you go, the Sunshine state, more like your basement than your actual basement.

Side Note: Basements have always been a novelty to me. I grew up Florida near the coast. Not a lot of people have them in Florida, and out near the coast they’re nearly non-existent. Those who had them either had the kind that were built into a hill (also far and few between) or eventually owned an indoor swimming pool come the next hurricane. So the idea that Florida is America’s basement holds a certain level of irony…

So there you have it!  However, if you the readers wish to comment upon the post, let us know by sending us an email message. (Contact details are posted and the end of this newsletter). We’ll compile the replies we receive and post it in a future issue. 

“See” you in the “basement”!

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Theatre 40 of Beverly Hills presents its fourth play of their 2022-23 season with Katie Forgette’s INCIDENT AT OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP, a comical “memoire” of the life and times of an almost middle working class Irish Catholic family, and their feeble attempt to live their lives in the most progressive way they can while living under an invisible drape of guilt.

The year is 1973, the moment of so-called change in domestic society. The place is the O’Shey residence located somewhere in the middle of America, or perhaps in the northeast section of the country, or somewhere in between the two. Ivy Khan plays Linda O’Shey, the narrator of this story. She’s a nineteen year old child of an adult age. She lives with her mother Josephine a.k.a. “Jo” (Allison Blanchard), who does everything in this homestead from cooking, cleaning, paying the bills, and keeping the household in a method of order. She’s married to her husband Mike (Patrick Skelton) the real breadwinner of the house who works twelve hour days seven days a week as the provider he’s expected to be. (Both Jo and Mike grew up during the Great Depression where everything was saved and used up no matter what it was!) Along with the immediate family is Jo’s sister Theresa a.k.a. “Terri” (Milda Dacys) who is a bit more progressive than her sibling, but not by much. Living upstairs as a permanent invalid is Mike’s mother (and Linda’s grandmother) Grandmother O’Shea (Theresa O’Shea) who’s never seen but is heard when she wants help and assistance in just about everything. And Linda has her kid sister Becky (Danika Hughey) who’s current hobby is playing with her dolls (at age thirteen) and has an obsession with old movies she watches on TV’s Late Late Show. Her favorite is old Humphrey Bogart pictures that’s mostly in the film noir category. Linda tells the audience on how they live their lives that are far removed from the early 21st century where what went on was limited to their home, the neighborhood, and their local Catholic church they belonged to as social media was yet to be invented. The situations Linda tells about are mini family tragedies, ranging from her mother asking Linda to explain to Becky the details on “the birds and the bees” including the story of menstruation and how to make babies. Linda even gets into trouble when Becky as “Sam Spade” uses a hidden tape recorder to record Linda’s sex tape lessons, only to “accidentally” play the recordings to Father Lovett, the priest at church. One element leads to another where this family becomes dysfunctional, long before such dysfunctional families became trendy, if not used as a status symbol in later post-modern life!

This play written by Katie Forgette could pass off as a story that could be based on the playwright’s own life and times growing up in a family stuck between remittance of the 1930’s where children were seen but not heard, the 1950’s where one must be perfect and as WASPish as possible, and the 1970’s where among other things, Women’s Lib was either a blessing, a curse, or a cruel joke depending on what or who wanted to believe in or trust! The humor falls being just a bit snarky and cocky with good nature. But its protagonist Linda sees it as that, even admitting to note as just what the hell everyone was thinking when looking at all of these episodes occurring from back in the day.

The cast of performers play their roles with these rules as suggested. Alison Blanchard as mother Jo is humble and living as the ever pleasing mother and wife, though she knew that she could have been a contender. Milda Dacys as Aunt Terri is the voice or reason, yet knows when to stay out of the way of her sister and family when necessary. Patrick Skelton plays out a number of roles from Mike the father, Father Lovett, as well as Mrs. Henkenback, a nosey neighbor that gets into the family’s life more than she should. Danika Hughey as kid sister Becky is more of a tomboy, even though she still keeps her troll tolls if not donning a 1940’s era trench coat and fedora imitating Bogie. Theresa O’Shey as Grandmother is only heard through a muffled voice, but is never seen and perhaps just as well. And Ivy Khan as Linda is the lead who knows that everything that occurred some fifty years before is a past that should stay in the past rather than another period time ready for a reboot.

With such period plays comes the period dressings. Michele Young’s costuming with  Judi Lewin’s hair, wig, and makeup design also harks toward that era that is post 1960’s with hints of hippy-era mood and flavor. And Theater 40’s residence set designer Jeff G. Rack dresses the set of the O’Shay home that looks and feels like the middle class life of the time.

Directed by Ann Hearn Tobolowsky, INCIDENT AT OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP is a stage comedy that recalls a moment where living as a Catholic family was a struggle between pushing for pain while pulling for pleasure, as well as when family members had to live under the unwritten rules that placed them to where they stand. It’s a comedy production that also has charm and heart. Call this nostalgia that did happen, or perhaps not. Then again, times do charge for its better or for its worse. But never mind the worst as this theater piece is at its best!

INCIDENT AT OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP, presented by Theatre 40 and performs at the Reuben Cordova Theatre, located within the campus of Beverly Hills High School, 241 South Moreno Drive (off little Santa Monica Blvd.) Beverly Hills, until February 19th. Showtimes are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights at 7:30 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM.   

For ticket reservations, call (310) 364-0535, or via online at http://www.Theatre40.org

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SOUTHERN GIRLS, a drama by Sheri Bailey & Dura Temple about six women living in the same small town in Alabama that grow up and mature over a thirty year period, performs at the Hudson Backstage Theater in Hollywood.

The six girls consist of Naomi Hurdle (Ash Saunders), Ruth Hurdle (Jessica Sade Ward), Katie Spokely (Dolly Granger), June-Adele Taylor (Maria Jimena Gastelum), Wanda Sue Johnson (Swisyzinna), and Charlotte Cecil Martin (Arianna Evangelia). These half dozen live within the same community in a small town in Alabama, not too far from the larger city of Montgomery. The story begins in the early 1950s where the town was divided between the white community and the “negro” section of town. Three of these girls are white, two are black, while one is a mix of both, the reason for her being lighter skinned. From their girlhood, they know where they stand in their status class. But over the years, the situation of race becomes profound as they experience it one way or another. These issues establish their friendships, while other factors strain their meaning toward each other. Over time, a few will leave their community while a the rest will remain. It’s a story that crosses the notion of what was going on in the nation as a whole, and the personal “nation” that exists as part of their own shape of being.

This play written by playwrights Sheri Bailey & Dura Temple, take a hard look of the perception between living as a white person and an African American individual as expressed by the writing team that is both of the black (Bailey) and white (Temple) race, giving their dialogue a sense of honesty and truth, from their youthful innocence to their peak of maturity. The six performers that appear in this play show that honesty as their portrayals beginning as kids to being grown up women existing in their midlives.

The stage set shows simplicity through the complex set of episodes as depicted in this production. Mylette Nora’s costuming displays the maturity that the characters go through, and Fritz Davis’ production design assists within the elements that are taking place in their town and outside places through the eras of time for their better and through their worse.

Directed by Zadia Ife, SOUTHERN GIRLS is more than a sense of American “southern living”, but an example of where there were as two methods of living in the American south. A divide that in many ways, still exist in the present era. But through all of what is told on stage, there is a presence of hope and progression to make it a reality. And as a phrase notes, there is a change that’s gonna come, and it will arrive soon.

SOUTHERN GIRLS, presented by All the Way West Productions, and performs at the Hudson Backstage Theatre, 6539 Santa Monica Blvd., (one block west of Wilcox), Hollywood, until February 26th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday matinees at 3:00 PM. 

For online ticket orders and for more details, visit http://www.Onstage411.com/SouthernGirls

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2023 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers and not necessarily those of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

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AND THE WINNER IS…?

This is a line that was created and as inspired by many of those media-esque awards programs and presentations that is now part of the early calendar year landscape. The awards season were kicked off by the Golden Globe Awards that was held this year on January 10th–a Tuesday since its previous day slot of Sunday was taken over by Sunday Night Football, and after not taking place last year due to NBC’s non interest of coverage due to some backstage going ons at the The Hollywood Foreign Press Association, the group that organizes the said awards, and continues through the next few weeks concluding toward the biggest awards show of them all, the Academy Awards on Sunday, March 12th. Here, every group from those that only exists to pass off awards to the trade guilds that recognize their peers involved in the media they work within will present citations for the best in their industry.

Of course, movies seem to take the spotlight right now since television is an ongoing group (and the Emmy Awards won’t be taking place until September), and recorded music’s Grammy Awards stand as their own entity. So movies lie front and center right now.

The movie industry itself is still struggling to confirm with the results of the Pandemic, now approaching it’s third anniversary where theater had to shut down in order to prevent the spread of the virus. Many of these movie theaters did eventually open as before, while others were shut down for good. But seeing the results of such titles as Top Gun: Maverick, Avatar: The Way of Water, Black Panther: Wakanda Forever, as well as other features making bank at the box office, folks, especially those of a younger demographic, are flocking back to the real movie houses to see a movie in a physical place that can’t necessarily be duplicated in a home setting. Of course, one has to pay for the privilege with admission, the cost of popcorn and related snacks, and the notion of getting to the movie house via transportation. But for these folks, the effort is worth the time and money to do so.

That is great for the movie theaters. However, the movies that tend to become mentioned within these award programs tend to be more of the “art” movie variety, a dramatic film that has complex plots, characters that show their depth, and are very intriguing for what they are. They are usually based upon actual characters and/or events, rather that movies that are follow up to previous movies featuring the same cast and characters, a medium that is an Intellectual property (IP) that’s based upon a physical product and/or a service, or something else that is already familiar or “pre-sold” to the public at large.

However, when it comes to the movies that tend to be nominated for various awards, let alone winning a few, these are movies that are good and even great for what they are. However, when it comes to titles that are entertaining and even money making is another factor as it stands.

First, let’s look at the award winning movies. Many titles that may get an award for something or another are based upon actual people and/or events. These people/events tend to fall within the tragic side of things. They have conflict toward their issues, and do not necessarily mean that they will experience a so-called “happy ending”. They may die from their result or fall into some realm of ruin. This is where the drama comes in. They may struggle within their own terms, and they may experience joy and success later on that isn’t depicted or noted within the feature. That notion is either left for a sequel that may be created or not, or it’s left to the viewer’s imagination or assumption.

This writer has been stating on and off of why the movie industry exists and why people will pay to go to the movies. Here is the simple “log line” to answer these factors… 

Movies are created to make money. The movie industry is a business. The goal of a business is to be profitable i.e. make money. If a movie studio creates some product that people will want to see, then it will be profitable and thus, make money. It doesn’t have to be a so-called “good” movie, but if people are willing to pay for the privilege of seeing this title, give the theater attendees just what they want! Movie attendees will be entertained, and movie studios will make money. Everyone’s pleased and happy. The end!

Those same movie attendees go to the movies for escapism. They want to “travel” into a world that may or may not exist to see characters that may exist or not to perform in various places and doing things that reflect toward their caricature and where they are located, real or otherwise. And what better was to “escape” is to view a movie that holds these characteristics, especially in a big dark room shared by strangers that react to what is going on the big screen.

Of course, there are exceptions to these rules, assuming that they are even called “rules”. But this gives the basic idea to what movies are made and why people go to the movies that’ve been going on for over one hundred years.

So this writer will see and even participate in what movies get their awards. Granted, they may not be big money makers or even be entertaining for what they are. But that is not up to yours truly. I am just a micro speck in this wacky industry called Hollywood. I cherish this industry as much as I may despise it. Then again, I have lots of love/hate relationships with a lot of things. Some are dull and boring while others are important. But I am not the only one top speak out about this industry. So I will turn my podium over toward those others that have bigger and louder voices as myself. And you won’t have to go far to find ‘em either. Social media is packed with them. Visit your favorite portal and check ‘em out.

PS..Thanks for stopping by here. I’m honored to be worth your time. And say “hi” to everyone else for me! It will save me the trouble of doing it myself!!

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The Sierra Madre Playhouse kicks off their annual Solo Shows Festival, consisting of four solo performances that comprises four real life characters that speak upon themselves and what they went through to where they stood in their lives, either in the long run or just for that particular moment.

The first of the four starts off with BILLIE! BACKSTAGE WITH LADY DAY, where the performance focuses upon legionary blues and jazz singer Billie Holiday.

Synthia L. Hardy portrays Billie. The opening scene takes place backstage at an unnamed cabaret club. She’s scheduled to speak to a reporter that wants some insight into her life and career. She barely remembered her appointment to talk to this reporter. But just as she is, she speaks to this journalist. In reality, she addresses the audience in her own flamboyant style. The only one in the room is her piano man (Lanny Hartley, alternating with Woody Woods) who’s seated in front of an old upright piano, ready to play a song where Billie sets the mood.

She speaks about her life growing up in Philadelphia where she faced being assaulted as a ten year old, and later sent to a “reform school”. She was later arrested at the age of thirteen accused for prostitution as well for narcotic use and abuse. What made things rather uneasy for her was the fact that she was “colored”, bringing her to an even lower status. But Billie knew the challenges she faced, and it was her jazz and blues vocalizations that made her what she became to be. She was full of talent as well as patience, never giving up even if the odds were not in her favor.

The second act consists of Billie at her finest. With a quartet of musicians backing her up consisting of Bobby Wilkerson on drums, David “D Wake” Wakefield (alternating with Mark Allen Felton) on sax, Michael Saucier on bass, along with Hartley/Woods on piano, Billie presents a number of tunes both as well known standards as well as some new “old” discoveries that not only brings her style up front and center, but proves that this lady can indeed sing the blues!

Synthia L. Hardy created this showcase that tells a bit of Billie and where she arrived musically. Her ability to play Billie is done with style and grace, even if Billie herself can become a bit rough around the edges. Under the stage direction of Bryan Rasmussen, this program is one part solo performance, and other part concert that services as a fine bookend to what Billie was in her lifetime and how others of her ilk used her abilities to bring the legacy of blues and jazz music up toward the musical standards of here and now.

Billie Holiday was a performer that became great when she was active in her time, and became greater long after her career (and life) was long completed. It’s always grand to see such performers as Synthia L. Hardy to show how music, especially in such genres as blues and jazz, never goes out of style. These types of harmonic sounds recall both the good and not-so-good things as part of a life as Billie experienced. After all, that is what makes the reason to live and to live with reason. And having a bit of soul in one’s musical step always helps in its long run!

BILLIE! BACKSTAGE WITH LADY DAY, presented by and performs at The Sierra Madre Playhouse, 87 West Sierra Madre Blvd., Sierra Madre, until January 22nd. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 2:00 PM. 

For ticket reservations, call (626) 355-4318, or online at  http://SierreMadrePlayhouse.org

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Burbank’s Victory Theatre opens their 2023 season with the west coast premier of Warren Leight’s HOME FRONT, a drama about a triangle of three people that stood in different landscapes within their lives and how it all meshed together not by choice, but through circumstance that domestic society found as acceptable.

The opening scene takes place on August 15th, 1945 when the Japanese declared a surrender with the USA declaring the official end of World War II. Thousands of folks crowded places such as New York City’s Times Square to street celebrate the end of the long war. Within this celebration starts a meeting with Annie Overton (Austin Highsmith Garces), a young woman who recently became a war widow, and James Aureluis Walker (C.J. Lindsey), a Naval Lieutenant. They meet in a “cute meet” fashion and later have their sights among each other, However, they hold a difference. She’s white and he’s “colored”. Before long, they become a romantic couple and eventually rent out a small yet humble basement apartment. While getting the place in order, Annie meets one of her neighbors within the unit, Edward Glimmer (Jonathan Slaven). He, too, did his duty in the war as a medic. His difference is the fact that he is of the “homosexual” persuasion. He and Anne eventually become friends as fast as she fell for James. But things unravel from there when Annie conceives a child from James, and James himself becomes in a bind with the Navy that’s not of his making in spite of being an officer. It’s a story on how differences occurred during a time where because of America’s victory in a worldwide conflict, things should become for the better to and for all. Instead, it was deemed to fall further behind due to what society labeled as the so-called right thing to exist.

This play written by Warren Leight uses actual instances that occurred during WWII, including the James Walker’s character as part of the “Golden 13”, a baker’s dozen of Negro enlisted men who trained to become Naval officers within a shorter time span (eight weeks) instead of the sixteen weeks the Navy would give to those that were white. (It had something to do with an attempt to prove that Negros would not be suitable to serve as officers, but succeeded with high scores upon their training and testing.) As to the performances by the three cast members, C.J. Lindsey as James Walker presents himself as a strong lead. Austin Highsmith Garces as Annie Overton is the young woman, (or “girl” as she would be called during these wartime and post-war eras) who sees James as a war hero (even if he never saw actual combat), and didn’t consider race as an issue. Jonathan Slaven as Edward Glimmer has a lot of character within his style, but never shows his persuasion to be buried deep in a “closet”. In fact, he becomes the voice of reason to Annie, even willing to assist James in his Naval concerns. 

Besides the performances of this talented trio, there is the stage set as designed by Even Bartoletti that consists of a basement apartment that is sparse in decor with brick walls and industrial light fixtures (after all, it is a basement apartment), yet shows its coziness enough to make it as an ideal starter dwelling. 

Directed by one of the Victory Theater’s artistic director’s Maria Gobetti, this play presents the notion that war is hell not only on the battlefields, but on the home front as well. Long after this war is replaced by other conflicts the nation would become involved with, the attitudes of race and persuasion would change over time, but its changes would be slow where other may believe that the said changes never became completed. Yet as a play, this production holds its drama as solid with periods of light comedy added to the mix that blends itself out. The aggressive conflicts may have come to its ends, but the issues that set its pace still lingers. Perhaps that armistice was signed long ago. Then again, maybe not. But as theater, this play is recommended.

HOME FRONT, presented by and performs at The Victory Theatre, 3326 West Victory Blvd. (off Hollywood Way), Burbank, until February 12th. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday nights at 8:00 PM, and Sunday afternoons at 4:00 PM. For tickets and for further information, call (818) 841-5421, or via online at  http://www.TheVictoryTheatreCenter.org

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The 28th annual Critics Choice Awards ceremony was held on Sunday, January 15th from the The Fairmount Century Plaza Hotel in Century City, California. The CW Network aired the program live.

Chelsea Handler served as the masters of ceremonies where awards were presented by the choosing of Critics Choice Association, presenting the best in television programming and feature films. 

Among the many awards that were presented, ranging from Best Ensemble Cast (feature films), Best Actor/Actress in a Comedy/Drama (ilm/television), Best Supporting Actor/Actress in Feature/TV, etc., two special awards were presented. 

Janelle Monáe was awarded as part of the #SeeHer movement where females are presented in movies and TV shows in a positive and progressive light, and Jeff Bridges received a Lifetime Achievement Awards as awarded to Bridges by John Goodman.

Better Call Saul won Best Dramatic Television Program, Abbot Elementary was awarded Best Comedy Television Program, and Everything Everywhere All At Once was awarded for Best Feature Film. 

The Critics Choice Association consists of members who work as professional journalists that write and review films and TV shows in publications that exist through multimedia outlets. (Disclaimer: This writer is a member of the CCA.)

For a complete listing of all titles nominated and its associated winning categories, visit http://www.CriticsChoice.com

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those of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

TECH FROM BACK IN THE DAY

This week, the CES (Consumers Electronic Show) in Las Vegas had its run in full capacity for the first time since 2020. This is the convention where just about anything and everything  in high tech was on display in Sin City’s biggest trade show in terms of size and attendance.

On occasion, we have been covering various news about what’s been going on in terms of gadgets, trends, and various forms of bits and bytes (pun intended) since we have been churching out this new service. And instead of letting you readers know what’s new, we thought we would reach into our vast archives to give you insights of what came and went. And one of these things was something called “Mosquito Ringtones” that were meant for kids’ cellphones.

To give you an idea of what we were writing about, here’s the original article with the headline Mosquito Ringtones for Kids Only that appeared within the annals of ALOL back in Vol. 12-No. 2-Week of January 8th, 2007…

Ask any parent who has kids aged ten or older if their youngins’ have or want their own cell phone. A good sized number of them will answer a whole hearty “yes” to this fact. It’s no surprise that one of the most common devices anyone from “tweeners” and up possesses is a device that can take pictures, send messages via text, play MP3 sound files and oh yes…send and receive phone calls!

One of the many aftermarket elements of a phone (read: something that is part of the phone device but was obtained after the phone was purchased) is a custom ringtone. Sure, every phone will have some built-in sound programmed within a phone that will give off some kind of sound that’s outside of the standard “rrriiinnnggg” that such phones tend to give off. Usually, custom ring tones consist of the first few seconds of some popular tune–usually some hip-hop number or some other song that is favored by the under 21 crowd, though custom ringtones are mostly favored by this youth demographic, many older folks- that is, adults-use custom ringtones of songs that are of their interest and tastes. 

One of the more annoying elements of somebody’s cell phone ringing is the fact that the phone will make noise in an unwanted time and place, such as during a movie in a theater, while class is in session, or when one is in conversation with another and then somebody’s phone goes off! (Note: a conversation is usually considered an annoying time for a phone to go off, but since many are so used to having their phones ring whenever they ring, sometimes this is no longer labeled as uncouth!) Yes, there is such a device on a phone where one can place their phone to “vibrate”, making a soft buzzing sound while vibrating like a …well…vibrator! The user of the phone can feel the phone “ringing” while not making a loud sound for all to hear. Alas, many of these phone users do not bother placing their phone on vibrate when they should, or they simply “forget” to do such! So when their phone rings, it makes a noise or plays the first twenty seconds of some tune that was downloaded from somewhere!

There is a solution to this problem, especially for you folks under the age of 30!! One can download something called “Mosquito Ringtones”. Available on the ‘net (of course), these special ringtones are selected high pitched “beep tones”  that are “..ultrasonic ringtones that  ADULTS CAN’T HEAR!!!!” (A direct quote from Mosquito Ringtone’s home web page!) And according to the same website, a Mosquito Ring tone is “..a tone outside the audible range of hearing of most people over 30. This means that you can get phone calls and receive text messages in class or school without teachers hearing it…”

Well, the so-called “silent” ringtones consist of an assortment of high pitched tones that range from a 8khz tone that “everyone” can hear, to 10khz (age 60 and younger), 12khz (50 and younger), 14.1khz (49 and younger), 14.9khz (39 and younger), 15.8khz (30 and younger), and an assortment of tones in the 16.7khz, 17.7khz, 18.8khz, 19.8khz, 21.1khz, and  22.4khz sound spectrum for those up to 24 years old.

To see if such tones really work, this writer who is “north of 35” tested some of these sounds judging if one can hear the tones. It was more like a hearing test as some tones were louder than others. Some of the tones, such as the 22.4khz and 21.1khz, could not be heard, (ditto for the 16.7khz, 17.7hkz, 18.8khz, and 19.8khz tones). For the 30+ tones, the 15.8khz tone was barely heard. The same story applies for the 14.9htz and 14.1 khz tones. However, the remaining three tones designed for the 49 and up bunch was heard. Of course, the “everybody” tone was the loudest.

Now this writer cannot judge from this web site if such tones really work as intended. The best way to find out if such tones actually work is to check out the web site for one’s self at http://www.freemosquitoringtones.org. Again, no guarantees if these ringtones will work are given or implied. This “hearing test” is for entertainment and informational purposes only.

The best solution to the annoying cell phone ring situation is to place the phone on vibrate or even on silent at all times! OK…maybe you can’t hear that Fall Out Boy tune that’s programmed when your best buddy calls, or that rap jam when your main squeeze gives you a call! (Perhaps for the 15th time that day? That hour??) But at least only you, the cell phone owner, will know if somebody’s calling you! Besides, does one really want to use a cell phone ring that sounds like the soundtrack of a TV test pattern? Then again, it’s your cell phone!!

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2023 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers and not necessarily those of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!

A CLEAN SLATE AGAIN!

As this message is being published, it’s January 1st, the first day of a new year. It’s the moment where one looks back at the previous year now placed in the history books to say (or heave) a solemn statement with a hearty “Goodby and Good Riddance!”

Perhaps so. The past year had plenty of its ups and downs. Most media outlets tend to stick to the negative side of things. Yes, there were a lot of those, too many to mention here. However, there was a lot of good that did take place. Some of that good made the ranks of social media. But a lot of good occurred within individuals that didn’t necessarily get around to post it through the usual outlets, but were for the good nevertheless.

What were some of those elements that occurred in ’22 that were upbeat, positive, and most importantly, for the better? Well, people reached their life milestone moments within their lives, such as graduating from an educational institution, getting married, getting divorced (yes, some people see an end of a domestic marriage as an upbeat moment), reaching a birthday with an age that ends with a zero (although this can be a negative, but that is besides that point), finally getting out of a debt, and the list is endless.

Granted, one won’t find a headline stating that Jane Q. Public finally paid off her long standing credit card debts (although this writer as seen such “news” on various posts found on Facebook), but this really leans toward how a specific year will go done in a person’s history as “The year that_______!”

But 2022 is last year’s news. Now it’s 2023, a year that ends with an odd number. That means if one is counting how many years past, one has to count differently. It’s understood that this doesn’t mean much to anyone, but as an archivist, this writer has to count the year differently than I did the last year. For instance, 1973 will be fifty years(!) since that year was read on all calendars. That year had its moments. But that was fifty years ago, a time that folks can remember as it was like last year (plus forty-nine), while others have no memories of that time since they were either too young, or have yet to see the light of day! But this writer digresses!!

Whatever the case, all we have to state around here is that it’s the start of our 28th year, and we will do what we have been placing here for the past 27 seasons, offering our best in news and reviews, just as we were presenting back in the early days of the ‘net! Granted, we may not be as famous as those so-called influencers out there in metaland, but fame was never our intention. We do what we do because of the intention of having honor and respect in terms of reporting on the media. Perhaps that will be our new year’s resolution for ’23. Then again, new year’s resolutions tend to be announced on January 1st only to be broken by February 1st. So maybe we better watch what we say, or write in this case!

Until then, enjoy this year while you can. It’s the only one to work with!

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ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE

is a presentation of Linear Cycle Productions

Details@AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com

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Details@LinearCycleProductions.com

http://www.AccessiblyLiveOffLine.com

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@AccessiblyLive (Twitter)

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEHxSllfDItpWh3z8vuUb_w

(Accessibly Live’s channel on YouTube)

http://www.LinearCycleProductions.com

#AccessiblyLiveOffLine

(Look for us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and see us on YouTube!)

ACCESSIBLY LIVE OFF-LINE (C) 2023 Linear Cycle Productions. All rights reserved. The views and opinions are those of the writers and not necessarily 

those of the staff and management. ‘Nuff said!